Navigator
Facebook
Search
Ads & Recent Photos
Recent Images
Random images
Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

This is where you can talk about every subject (previously it was called shout room)

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jan 30, 2020 1:37 am

All-female tote bag factory

Image

A recently established tote bag factory has created jobs for 25 women in the Kurdistan Region's Halabja and aims aims to raise awareness on dangers of plastic on health, environment

The tote bag production is part of the "Green City Halabja" campaign, run by the NWE NGO and partially funded by the German Consulate and WADI organization

Altogether, the women sew 50 to 100 tote bags on a daily basis.

"We are a group of 25 women who decided to establish this little factory sewing tote bags with different designs," Gashaw Saeed who is in charge of the factory, told Rudaw on Saturday.

According to Saeed, the idea to establish the factory stemmed from attempts to reduce the use of plastic bags, nylons and other materials which damage the environment.

"Halabja is a friend of the environment" is the main motto adorning their tote bags, which are distributed at seminars run across Halabja. 2000 free tote bags have been distributed so far.

In coordination with non-governmental organizations, factory staff run awareness campaigns across kindergartens, schools, government offices, refugee camps and remote areas across the province, reminding locals of how they can protect the environment.

" I hope through those people take part in the seminars, more people are acquainted with the usefulness of the tote bags," said Sara Salam, head of the environmental department of NWE.

Hiwa Salahaddin, a government employee who has taken part in a seminar said that that he will now use tote bags instead of plastic ones.

The factory initiative is "a great step forward," he added.

Plastic bags are widely used across the Kurdistan Region for daily needs, especially food items.

In May 2019, the Sulaimani province, the first across the Kurdistan Region, decided to ban the use of plastic bags across bakeries ordering them to switch to paper bags, citing health concerns.

Such measures have, however, not taken place in Erbil despite calls from local residents.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/business/19012020
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22428
Images: 533
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Feb 02, 2020 6:18 pm

Milan car ban:

Drivers ignore anti-pollution measure

Italian police have handed out 162 fines in less than three hours to people ignoring a driving ban in Milan.

The temporary ban started at 10:00 local time (09:00 GMT) and will last until the early evening in an attempt to curb the city's smog problem.

But within just two and a half hours, police were handing out fines of 164 euros (£137) to those flouting the ban.

Milan was named Europe's most polluted city in 2008 and smog remains a recurring problem.

By 12:30 local time on Sunday, there had been 621 checks on people not adhering to the "Sunday walk" day, local media reported.

Image

The ban does not apply to electric vehicles or the disabled. Some streets have remained open, in particular to allow access to AC Milan's San Siro Stadium.

It is not the first time cars have been banned from within city limits and it has not proved popular with everyone. Regional counsellor for the environment Raffaele Cattaneo called it "demagogy with a green sauce".

Last month, several Italian cities, including Rome as well as Milan, temporarily banned diesel vehicles after pollution levels soared.

Vehicle emissions are the most common source of microparticles hazardous to health, known as PM10s and PM 2.5s.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-51350604
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22428
Images: 533
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Feb 11, 2020 10:26 pm

Deforested Amazon areas
net emitters of CO2


Up to one fifth of the Amazon rainforest is emitting more CO2 than it absorbs, new research suggests

Results from a decade-long study of greenhouse gases over the Amazon basin appear to show around 20% of the total area has become a net source of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

One of the main causes is deforestation

While trees are growing they absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere; dead trees release it again.

Millions of trees have been lost to logging and fires in recent years.

The results of the study, which have not yet been published, have implications for the effort to combat climate change.

They suggest that the Amazon rainforest - a vital carbon store, or "sink", that slows the pace of global warming - may be turning into a carbon source faster than previously thought.

Every two weeks for the past 10 years, a team of scientists led by Prof Luciana Gatti, a researcher at Brazil's National Institute for Space Research (INPE), has been measuring greenhouse gases by flying aircraft fitted with sensors over different parts of the Amazon basin.

What the group found was startling: while most of the rainforest still retains its ability to absorb large quantities of carbon dioxide - especially in wetter years - one portion of the forest, which is especially heavily deforested, appears to have lost that capacity.

Gatti's research suggests this south-eastern part of the forest, about 20% of the total area, has become a carbon source.

"Each year is worse," she told Newsnight.

"We observed that this area in the south-east is an important source of carbon. And it doesn't matter whether it is a wet year or a dry year. 2017-18 was a wet year, but it didn't make any difference."

A forest can become a source of carbon rather than a store, or sink, when trees die and emit carbon into the atmosphere.

Areas of deforestation also contribute to the Amazon's inability to absorb carbon.

Carlos Nobre, who co-authored Prof Gatti's study, called the observation "very worrying" because "it could be showing the beginnings of a major tipping point".

He believes the new findings suggest that in the next 30 years, more than half of the Amazon could transform from rainforest into savanna.

For decades, scientists have warned of an "Amazon tipping-point": the point at which the forest loses its ability to renew itself and begins to emit more carbon than it absorbs.

"[The Amazon] used to be, in the 1980s and 90s, a very strong carbon sink, perhaps extracting two billion tonnes of carbon dioxide a year from the atmosphere," says Prof Nobre, who is also a researcher at the University of Sao Paulo's Institute for Advanced Studies and Brazil's leading expert on the Amazon.

"Today, that strength is reduced perhaps to 1-1.2bn tonnes of carbon dioxide a year."

To put that in context, a billion tonnes of carbon dioxide is almost three times what the UK said it officially emitted in 2018.

But that figure does not take into account the amount of carbon dioxide released through deforestation and forest fires.

And after almost a decade going down, deforestation in the Amazon has increased significantly in recent years. 2019 was a particularly bad year.

Between July and September last year, destruction was above 1,000 sq km (386 sq mi) per month.

"In our calculations, if we exceed that 20-25% of deforestation, and global warming continues unabated with high emission scenarios, then the tipping point would be reached," says Prof Nobre, one of the first proponents of the tipping point theory. "Today we are at about 17%," he adds.

Opinions on when this tipping point could occur differs among scientists.

"Some people think that it won't be until three-degrees warming - so towards the end of the century, whereas other people think that we could get [it with] deforestation up above 20% or so and that might happen in the next decade or two. So it's really, really uncertain," explained Simon Lewis, professor of global change science at UCL.

However Prof Lewis called the results of Nobre's research "shocking". "It says to me that perhaps this is more near-term than perhaps I was initially thinking."

Prof Nobre's theory was based on climate models. The new study is based on real-life observations, which produce more accurate results.

Prof Gatti told Newsnight she wanted to see a moratorium on deforestation in the Amazon to establish whether the trend could be reversed. But that looks unlikely.

Brazil's president has made his priority for the rainforest very clear: development over conservation.

Saving the Amazon is, for now, a question of political choice. But the science suggests that choice may not be on offer for very much longer.

You can watch Newsnight on BBC Two at 22:30 on weekdays. Catch up on iPlayer, subscribe to the programme on YouTube and follow it on Twitter.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-51464694
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22428
Images: 533
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Previous

Return to Roj Bash Cafe

Who is online

Registered users: Google [Bot], MSN [Bot]

cron
x

#{title}

#{text}