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Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

This is where you can talk about every subject (previously it was called shout room)

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed May 15, 2019 2:11 am

Outrage over man filming stowaway
raccoon as it falls off of his boat


A Florida agency is investigating potential animal cruelty charges after Clearwater lawyer Thomas Cope posted video of himself shooing a raccoon off his boat into the Gulf of Mexico

The raccoon appeared growling and hissing on Clearwater attorney Thomas Cope's boat, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) out in the Gulf of Mexico, Cope told the Tampa Bay Times.

Cope posted the video to Facebook showing the raccoon falling off the boat into the water, as a man's voice can be heard saying, 'So long, sucker.'

Cope later issued an apology for his actions, saying he wished he could have returned the animal to shore but that it was 'running around the boat hissing and growling.'

Raccoons can swim, and the animal is shown treading water in the video, but it's not clear whether one would be able to make it 20 miles back to shore as it would have had to do to survive in this case.

Social media users called out the behavior in the clips, with one person writing, 'I see no hissing and see only you act like a Jack a** calling him a sucker. F**k you man.'

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said in a statement that it learned of the video on May 8 and began an investigation and that 'these vile acts of animal cruelty' are intolerable.

DailyMail.com left a message for Cope seeking additional comment but did not immediately receive a reply.

Cope first posted the videos in three separate chunks in a private group called 'Center Consoles Only (CCOG),' where it was recorded and shared by a person named Jeff Wenzel, whose Facebook account lists him as being from Cleveland, Ohio.

Cope later said the following in a statement: 'The animal was running around the boat hissing and growling, making it impossible for me or my friend to drive the boat. Knowing raccoons can be rabid and unpredictable, the only realistic option we could think of in the moment was to get the raccoon off the boat.'

While rabies are considered dangerous because they may carry rabies, only one human has ever died from the raccoon strain of rabies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Further, 'a rabid raccoon is usually dead within 1-3 days of becoming infectious, and even if you're bitten by a rabid raccoon, effective post-exposure treatment is available,' the Humane Society website reads.

Cope's footage doesn't appear to show any aggressive behavior from the raccoon, as it started by showing the animal climbing on the ledge of the boat with a man yelling, 'Get off my f**king boat!'

Social media users called out the behavior in the clips, with one person writing, 'I see no hissing and see only you act like a Jack a** calling him a sucker. F**k you man'

Another voice asks, 'Are you videoing this s**t?' to which the first voice replies, 'Yeah!' as the raccoon jumps into the boat from the side.

As the raccoon climbs around, the man's voice continues. 'What the f**k's wrong with-get off my boat!'

With the animal now at the front of the boat, the man yells, 'God d**n coon, get off my boat!'

With the raccoon climbing on the ledge of the boat, as a man yells, 'Get off my f**king boat!' With the animal now at the front of the boat, the man yells, 'God d**n coon, get off my boat!'

It sounds as if someone is stomping off-camera, as the man says, 'Dude get the gaff, we're just gonna have to push him off,' as the raccoon has moved to the right side of the boat

'Yah!' the man yells, as the raccoon clings to the side of the ledge. As the man backs up to grab the gaff from his friend, the raccoon then falls off, and the man says, 'There he goes,' while approaching the edge of the boat with the metal took in hand.

'Here, put it in gear,' the man says, while pointing the camera at the water to show that raccoon swimming. 'So long sucker!' he yells, as the video ends.

'Yah!' the man yells, as the raccoon clings to the side of the ledge. As the man backs up to grab the gaff from his friend, the raccoon then falls off, and the man says, 'There he goes,' while approaching the edge of the boat with the metal took in hand. 'Here, put it in gear,' the man says, while pointing the camera at the water to show that raccoon swimming. 'So long sucker!' he yells, as the video ends

The videos were then reposted by Wenzel on May 8, with a caption that read: 'Share this so people know what a real POS Thomas Cope is...its one thing to hunt animals for food or maybe not even like a particular animal, but to leave one 20 miles out in the ocean to suffer a horrible death is not what true "outdoorsman" do. It’s what cowardly entitled scumbag degenerate dirtbags do. This raccoon was just being a raccoon'

The videos were then reposted by Wenzel on May 8, with a caption that read:

'Share this so people know what a real POS Thomas Cope is...(let the video run) its one thing to hunt animals for food or maybe not even like a particular animal, but to leave one 20 miles out in the ocean to suffer a horrible death is not what true "outdoorsman" do. It’s what cowardly entitled scumbag degenerate dirtbags do. This raccoon was just being a raccoon.'

Most who commented on the post agreed with Wenzel, lambasting Cope in the comments

Alex Pushkina wrote, 'that raccoon will drown no doubts about it. You just sent a living animal to its death just because that raccoon accidentally showed up on your f**king boat! That animal is in the middle of nowhere. Hope karma will get ya'

'Disturbing that any human being thinks this is Acceptable - heartless disgusting spineless soulless a**hole is exactly what This man is and I see a poor helpless raccoon that is terrified,' wrote Shelley Zahos Schefke.

Alex Pushkina wrote, 'that raccoon will drown no doubts about it. You just sent a living animal to its death just because that raccoon accidentally showed up on your f**king boat! That animal is in the middle of nowhere. Hope karma will get ya.'

Another called Cope a 'F-ing Jerk,' writing, 'Seriously leaving him out there to drown. What a baby man. He would have just ridden in with you.'

Others called for criminal repercussions for Cope's actions, which the state's wildlife agency is looking into

'Hope he gets done for Animal cruelty. The animal would have kept it's distance until they reached shore. What an a**hole,' Peter Duffy wrote.

In a statement the agency said, 'It is still too early to speculate as to what violations took place in this incident. However, the FWC would like to state that we believe these vile acts of animal cruelty have no place in our state or anywhere else.'

Others like Joe Magalski took issue with the characterization of the act as one of animal cruelty. Magalski wrote, 'These animal cruelty claims are insane.'

One user said, 'Has nobody encountered a wild raccoon before, or more specifically one you accidentally cornered like in a garage, or a boat? Just because it's cute doesn't mean it won't inflict serious damage'

Dale Luginbill disagreed with the comments suggesting the boat should have been taken back to shore with the raccoon on board, but still criticized Cope

The investigation into the incident remains open at this time. Anyone with additional information about what happened has been asked to call the Wildlife Alert Hotline at 1-888-404-3922.

Dale Luginbill disagreed with the comments suggesting the boat should have been taken back to shore with the raccoon on board, but still criticized Cope.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... s-sea.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed May 15, 2019 11:18 pm

Heavy metals and harmful
chemicals poison Europe's seas


Three-quarters of areas tested show contamination, European Environment Agency says

Heavy metals and a cocktail of dangerous chemicals continue to poison Europe’s seas, with more than three-quarters of areas assessed showing contamination, according to a report.

The sea worst affected was the Baltic, where 96% of the assessed areas showed problematic levels of some harmful substances, according to the European Environment Agency. Similar problems were found in 91% of the Black Sea and 87% of the Mediterranean. In the north-east Atlantic, unsafe levels of chemicals or metals were found in 75% of assessed areas.

However, in most areas the situation was improving, as many of the toxic substances that have washed into the seas – such as the pesticide DDT and heavy metals such as cadmium and mercury – are now subject to bans or severe restrictions. The improvement in the breeding success of the white-tailed sea eagle in the Baltic, for instance, is attributed to the decline in DDT. A continuing problem is with flame-retardant chemicals, which are still used and still found in waterways, and DDT from Africa is still leaching into the Mediterranean.

Europe’s environmental watchdog called for greater controls on the way chemicals are used, and better monitoring of marine health. As well as the damage to human health, the toxins found in Europe’s seas are affecting marine animals.

Johnny Reker, lead author of the EEA report, told the Guardian it was important to be vigilant about potential new contaminants, as well as the existing ones. “Every two and a half minutes a new chemical is created, and we do not know the effects,” he said. “New pharmaceuticals are coming all the time, and getting into waste water. This is an emerging problem but we do not know what the effects will be.”

He cited the example of Germany, where young men have been found to produce only a third of the sperm that German men did 30 years ago. He said: “It remains difficult to prove a causal link between specific contaminants and the reduction of fertility. However, results from animal experiments and human health monitoring programmes indicate that the presence of endocrine disruptors in the environment, such as PCBs, may be partially responsible for this reduction in fertility.”

Mercury from coal-fired power stations continued to pollute Europe’s seas, despite the closure of many plants and technology to reduce mercury emissions, said Reker. “These things do not disappear when they get into the sea,” he said.

Dioxin has also been found in the waters of the Baltic, where it accumulates in the flesh of fatty fish such as salmon and herring. Pregnant women have been advised not to eat these as a result, or cut down their intake, as dioxin can restrict growth, cause cancer and adversely affect the immune system. Phthalates, used in plastics, which can act as endocrine disruptors, have been found in the Baltic and Atlantic.
It’s our priority…

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ropes-seas
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed May 15, 2019 11:29 pm

Cooking may turn homes into
toxic boxes of air pollution


Fry-ups and woodburners can cause high levels of particle pollution, campaigners warn

Tests in London found that the peak indoor pollution came from frying sausages and steaks.

Frying food and burning wood may turn homes into “toxic boxes” with high levels of air pollution trapped inside, campaigners have warned.

Case studies commissioned by the environment charity Global Action Plan (GAP) showed that ultrafine particle pollution was higher inside than outside in all four of the properties monitored. Tiny particles are thought to be especially harmful to health as they can enter the bloodstream and flow around the body into vital organs.

The 24-hour tests took place in houses in London, Pontypridd, Liverpool and Lancaster. In the latter, the average of 40,000 particles per cubic metre inside the home was more than seven times the outdoor average. In London, the peak indoor pollution resulted from frying sausages and steaks.

An opinion poll for GAP also found that 55% of parents said their children spend more time indoors then they did when they were young, potentially exposing them to more air pollution. Only 11% of parents thought their offspring spent more time outside than they did at that age.

Research published in February found that cooking a Sunday roast on a gas hob can drive small particle pollution in homes far above the levels found in the most polluted cities on Earth for an hour or two.

In 2016, a report from the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, led by Prof Stephen Holgate, highlighted the impact of indoor pollution, with sources including boilers, heaters and irritant chemicals from cleaning products.

Holgate is preparing a more in-depth study on the effects of indoor air pollution on children’s health. “These [case studies from GAP] provide early indicators of the scale of the air pollution challenge that we face in the UK,” he said. “With children spending increasing hours indoors, exposing them to ultrafine particles of pollution, urgent action needs to be taken to address the issue of indoor air pollution.”

“The combination of indoor and outdoor air pollution sources is turning our homes into toxic boxes, with pollution trapped inside,” said Chris Large, a senior partner at GAP, which is organising Clean Air Day on 20 June.

“It’s vital that we raise awareness that air pollution is everywhere, but that there are many things we can do, both indoors and outdoors,” he said. “Some key things you can do are driving less frequently and walking or cycling instead, and opening a window when cooking at home.”

Paul Young, whose end-of-terrace Victorian house in Lancaster hosted one of the case studies, saw peaks in pollution when his woodburner was in use. “Like lots of people we like to create a homely atmosphere, and yet I know that I am contributing to pollution in the rest of the city. We could seriously think about using the woodburner less frequently.”

Advice from GAP on woodburners says: “If you are considering buying a woodburner, ask yourself if you really need one.”

Emma Prior in Liverpool also hosted a case study and is a mother to two teenagers with asthma. “I was really surprised to see the peaks inside my house. Now I’m going to look at prioritising ventilation,” she said.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... -pollution
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed May 15, 2019 11:38 pm

I knew it:

Frying sausages and steaks causes pollution, proves red meat and pork are unhealthy 8-}
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 18, 2019 8:53 pm

Tesco is shutting down meat, fish, and deli counters across the UK.

Several Tesco stores in Cornwall, Burton, Devon, North Wales, and Kent have completely shut down counters or have reduced hours to only a couple of days a week. The change appears to be as a result of a lack of customer demand. “We’re making changes to our UK stores and head office to simplify what we do and how we do it, so we’re better able to meet the needs of our customers,” Tesco chief executive Jason Tarry told Cornwall Live.

Earlier this year, The Guardian reported that the change may affect 732 of the supermarket chain’s larger stores.

Tesco’s Plant-Based Food

Tesco has become a leader in vegan product launches over the past year, appealing to the rising consumer demand for healthier, more sustainable food. Its own-brand vegan ready-meal range, Wicked Kitchen, launched earlier last year and soon exceeded sales projections by more than double. The Wicked Kitchen meals were given partial credit for Tesco’s revenue spike in April 2018 and by August, Tesco shoppers had purchased four million of the vegan dishes.

Following the “phenomenal” consumer response, the grocery store chain announced it would add 26 new vegan products to the range. “At the start of the year, I said that veganism was going mainstream, and – as plant-based options are taking over the supermarket shelves – that belief is fast becoming a reality,” said Wicked Kitchen creator Derek Sarno at the time.

The grocery store chain was also the first in the UK to stock the Beyond Burger, a realistic vegan burger that “bleeds” like meat, made by California-based brand Beyond Meat.

“We know from our own data that flexitarianism is on the rise and many more customers are dabbling in cutting out meat for a day or so during their weekly diet,” said Tesco product development director, Kate Ewart. Even long-standing vegetarian brands like Quorn are taking notice of the fact that vegan products are not as niche as they once were. Over the summer, the company announced it had invested £7 million into research and development to create new vegan products.

Last April, Tesco began selling vegan products in the meat aisle in a bid to attract more customers.
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 18, 2019 8:58 pm

Vancouver bans shark fins for soup
hopefully foie gras be next?


By now, we pretty much all know how the shark fins that end up in the eponymous soup are harvested. But it’s worth repeating because it’s that awful

Sharks are caught, their coveted fins hacked off while they are still alive, and their writhing bodies tossed back into the ocean to bleed to death. This is cruelty and waste of the highest order. So, I applaud Vancouver City Council, which this week voted to support a federal bill that would ban the importation of shark fins.

I write this as a Caucasian with only a cursory understanding of the cultural significance of shark-fin soup, a pricey, special-occasion dish that was traditionally served at Chinese banquets and celebrations.

I do know the soup, which is expensive relative to other seafood, was traditionally a sign of prestige. It marked an occasion as special and signalled the hosts were going all out to celebrate; the equivalent, perhaps, of a champagne toast. I know, too, that some people who still serve shark-fin soup at banquets find the increasing concern over animal welfare laughable. At least that was my experience the night I ate it.

It was at a birthday celebration at a high-end seafood restaurant in Richmond. There was no menu; I just took my seat as dishes of exquisitely prepared seafood were placed before me. When the soup arrived, I was served a small bowl and, having never seen shark-fin soup before, had no idea what it was. It was mild and gelatinous, with a pleasingly silky texture. It wasn’t until the bowls were cleared that our hosts announced, with a touch of mischief, we had just eaten shark-fin soup. They watched for my reaction and chuckled a bit at my evident discomfort. Still, I didn’t say much, not wanting to cause offence.

Later, I asked other Chinese friends for their thoughts. Interestingly, all said they would never order shark-fin soup for animal-welfare and environmental reasons. Nonetheless, shark fins are still in such demand that some species teeter on extinction. And although “finning,” as fin removal is called, is illegal in Canada, it is still legal to import shark fin.

The motion was made by councillors Sarah Kirby-Yung and Michael Wiebe, two former park board commissioners who in their previous roles voted to ban keeping cetaceans in captivity. Ms. Kirby-Yung, whose husband is of Chinese descent, has been to her share of banquets where shark-fin soup was served. But attitudes change. “There are lots of people who no longer choose to have it at their wedding banquets,” she says. Indeed, The Washington Post reports China’s shark-fin soup consumption has fallen by about 80 per cent since 2011. The drop was largely the result of a publicity campaign mounted by basketball star Yao Ming, highlighting the cruelty of finning. Unfortunately, the soup’s popularity is rising in other Asian countries so overall demand remains high.

In voting to support the ban, council ignored advice from city staff, who urged council to stay mum pending the outcome of the federal bill. Staff noted the recent apology extended by the city to Chinese Canadians for past discrimination, which included prohibitions against food-related cultural practices, such as the barbecued pork and the duck you see hanging in Chinese restaurant windows. “Within the context of the city’s efforts toward reconciliation – the potential implications of a city-imposed ban on shark fin are complex.”

Council’s move this week falls short of a ban but is symbolic of our city’s increasing intolerance toward animal cruelty. And it was somewhat brave, given our cultural makeup, and the fact that many of Vancouver and Richmond’s finest Chinese restaurants still serve the soup and defend people’s right to eat it.

And lest any of us cast too many stones, consider the cruelty underpinning foods treasured by my forebears – foie gras, made from the liver of ducks and geese force-fed corn through a tube. Amid the rising tide of vegetarianism and animal-rights activism, might a ban on foie gras be next?

To read the wind, look to India, the first country to ban foie gras. It was followed by California and many European countries. We can hope Canada will be next :ymapplause:

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/ ... M4LXbsIDRo
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 18, 2019 9:02 pm

Amazon Tribe Wins Lawsuit, Blocks Big Oil’s
Bid To Destroy Millions Of Acres Of Rainforest


In a landmark victory, the Waorani people of Pastaza, an indigenous tribe from the Ecuadorian Amazon, successfully protected half a million acres of their ancestral territory in the Amazon rainforest from being mined for oil drilling by Big Oil companies

A three-judge panel of the Pastaza Provincial Court indefinitely suspended the auctioning of Waorani lands to oil companies by trashing the consultation process the Ecuadorian government had undertaken with the tribe in 2012.

After setting an invaluable legal precedent for other indigenous nations across the Ecuadorian Amazon by accepting a Waorani bid for court protection to stop an oil bidding process, the court also halted the contemplated auctioning of 16 oil blocks that cover over 7 million acres of indigenous territory.

    The Waorani people are one day away from saving half-a-million acres of forest from oil drilling. Watch the video and send a message to Ecuador’s government: protect indigenous rights & the Amazon. https://t.co/EMnWv8Bqng @AFrontlines #WeLoveTheEarth #WaoraniResistance pic.twitter.com/qlv5uY6Pg0

    — Leonardo DiCaprio (@LeoDiCaprio) April 25, 2019

Nemonte Nenquimo, president of the Waorani Pastaza Organization and plaintiff in the lawsuit, remarked:

“The government tried to sell our lands to the oil companies without our permission. Our rainforest is our life. We decide what happens in our lands. We will never sell our rainforest to the oil companies. Today, the courts recognized that the Waorani people, and all indigenous peoples have rights over our territories that must be respected. The government’s interests in oil is not more valuable than our rights, our forests, our lives.”

Oswando Nenquimo, spokesperson for the Waorani of Pastaza, added:

“Today we have protected our forest from oil drilling; we have protected our water from contamination; we have protected our children from sickness. This is a legal precedent for indigenous rights. But the fight is far from over. The government will appeal because they still want the oil beneath our land. Indigenous Nations across the Amazon and the world must band together to protect our homes.”

The lands are protected under Ecuador’s constitution that establishes the “inalienable, unseizable and indivisible” rights of indigenous people “to maintain possession of their ancestral lands and obtain their free adjudication.” The constitution also enshrines the need for prior consultation on any plans to exploit the underground resources, given the probable environmental and cultural impacts on tribal communities.

The state claims it reached an agreement with the Waorani over oil exploration in 2012, but the tribe alleges the agreement was based on fraudulent practices and claims that favoured oil companies and profits over the interests of people living on valuable land. The judges ordered the Ecuador government to conduct a new consultation, applying standards set by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

Mitch Anderson, executive director of Amazon Frontlines, said:

“This is a major precedent for indigenous rights across the Amazon. Today, the court has recognized a pattern of deceit, bad-faith and manipulative tactics in the Ecuadorian Government’s attempt to earmark the Waorani people’s lands for oil extraction.This is a huge step forward in the battle to ensure indigenous people’s rights over their lands are respected. Guaranteeing indigenous peoples’ rights to decide over their future and to say ‘No’ to destructive extractive projects is key to protecting the Amazon rainforest and halting climate change.”

https://www.captain-planet.net/amazon-t ... u8ls-gpB_E
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 18, 2019 9:26 pm

Elephant tramples man to death in India after locals
pelted it with stones when it gave birth to a calf


    Footage shows an elephant prodding its newborn calf as it lays on the ground

    Locals flocked to the scene in Ajnashuli and 'chucked stones at the animal'

    It's understood Shailen Mahato, 27, was killed, when the crowd were chased
A man was killed in an Indian village yesterday after a elephant went berserk when 'locals pelted it with stones after it gave birth to a calf'.

Footage showed the elephant prodding and trying to drag its newborn in Ajnashuli when it fell ill and was unable to get up.

According to reports, locals flocked to the scene and chucked stones at the animal, causing the mother to fly into a rage and charge.

It's understood Shailen Mahato, 27, was killed, when the crowd were chased.

In footage, the elephant was seen guarding the calf, while people tried to get near it.

It is thought the mother wanted to take the calf back to a forest, but stayed back and guarded when it fell ill.

According to locals the elephant tried to warn the crowd to stay back before its attack by marking the area with its feet.

Tensions rose after the incident and 10 other agitated elephants appeared in area.

Footage showed locals being chased through a forest by angry elephants.

The agitated elephant is still loitering in the area as her baby is still not strong enough to move into the jungle.

Forest rangers have cordoned off the area and banned public entry.

Officials from the forest department said they are keeping a close watch on the elephant and will not be able to send it back to its natural habitat until it calms down.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... -calf.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun May 19, 2019 12:00 am

Dredger damaged Loch Carron
reef secures protected status


A fragile flame shell reef which was severely damaged by scallop dredging on Scotland's north west coast has been granted permanent protection

Ministers had issued a temporary order banning mobile fishing on Loch Carron in Wester Ross after the 2017 incident.

Divers who visited the reef, which is a nursery ground for scallops, found the area had been "intensively" dredged.

But it now officially has Marine Protected Area (MPA) status which safeguards 23 sq km of the sea loch.

'Unsung heroes'

Phil Taylor, head of policy at environmental group Open Seas, described the initial devastation as a "wake-up call".

He added: "These divers are unsung heroes - by showing the damage that is being done to our seabed, they have raised huge political and public awareness of the problem.

"However, Loch Carron is just one small area, and over the past few decades the same degradation has happened elsewhere in our seas.

"We urgently need to regenerate all of our coastal seas - safeguarding seabed habitats will deliver a sustainable long term future for our rural economy and communities."

The MPA for Loch Carron, which comes into force on Sunday, means fishermen operating trawlers or dredging boats will not be able to fish.

It will mirror the area covered by existing emergency closure, with the exception of Plockton harbour where there is no evidence of a reef.

Open Seas has been calling for dredging to be banned around Scotland's coast because of the damaging impact it can have on the sea bed.

But fishing organisations have argued the move is unnecessary and that existing protections are enough.

Loch Carron is home to the world's largest-known flame shell bed with an estimate 250 million brightly-coloured molluscs.

The scallop dredger which caused the damage was not operating illegally since the area had no protected designation.

But it left the sea bed littered with broken shells and led to calls for dredging to be banned completely.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland- ... s-48322359

I think it would be a much better idea if such places are protected BEFORE the damaged is caused
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