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Can someone please help me?

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Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Fri Mar 14, 2008 5:57 am

roj bash. my name is matin. i'm half irani half kurdish. however i was never taught kurdish, only farsi. my grandfather is from sine and he is the ony person in my immediate family who speaks kurdish. i'm fluent in farsi and english but i would like to learn kurdish. i only speak a few words and i'm not even sure if they are right. i would greatly appreciate if someone could help me. i'm trying to learn some common phrases and improve my sentences. i'll write a couple sentences so you can get a idea of how much i know. (please correct me if it's not correct or spelled wrong)

slam. nawe min matina. nawe eywa chiya? min la los angeles zendegi akem. nima kurdim neema farsim wely kurdi zor nazanim.

zor spas,

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Can someone please help me?

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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Lost » Fri Mar 14, 2008 7:37 am

Kak (Mr.) .. Matin .. welcome to Roj Bash Kurdistan ( Good morning KURDISTAN) .. A thousands of time ..
honor is Ours ... i would like you to introduce yourself in the selection of Introduce your self .. you can make our forum much more friendly by this step .. and sure we're so glad to have you here .. here you can find to many nice peoples and kind peoples as i did.. and sure they gonna help you as possible as they could .. here your demand:
matin123 wrote:slam. nawe min matina. nawe eywa chiya? min la los angeles zendegi akem. nima kurdim neema farsim wely kurdi zor nazanim.

zor spas,


Sillaw .. nawi min MATINA .. Nawi Ewa Chiya? .. Min la Los angeles Dejim (in sorani hawler and its around) .. min Niwa Kurdm Niwa Farsm .. wella Kurdi zor bash nazanm ..

Dejim .. i live ..in hewler people saying . ( Dejim) in sulleymani ( Ejim) .. probably Kurds from Iran use Zindegi dekem which is not wrong .. but Dejim is most commonly used..

and you're welcome a thousands of time .. else? feel free to ask .. Xoş hatn, serçavên min .. (Welcome again Upon my eys)
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Eî xuda bo waye çaw kejallekem
Boçî napirsê le derdu hhallekem
Min perêşanim weku egirîcekey
Boçî dûre boçî nayîte mallekem
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Fri Mar 14, 2008 7:30 pm

zor spas kak shermin. that was a great help and also a very warm welcome. i also had a question about some words that i'm not sure if they are right or not.

excuse me - boakhsha
please - bazamat
have a nice day - rojeki xosh
good night - sho bakheir
your welcome - ?

and if i'm asking someone older than me how are you, do i say eywa chonen? or just choni?

thanks again and please forgive me if i'm asking too many questions. and i tried to find introduce yourself but i couldn't find it.
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Diri » Sat Mar 15, 2008 1:03 am

Hello kak Metîn...


"Shermin" is his title - not his nick... His nick is "Lost" and his name is Sîver... :)

If you have a look, you will see that "Shermin" is also written under your nick name... :wink: It basically means "Shy" (because you've not posted much yet - and when you DO post more, the title will change! :) )

Anyway - I'd like to make a comment first of all: please don't use "Irani" as a synonym for "Persian". This is a common mistake which most Persians make - and which most non-Persian Iranians get angry over... Like myself...

Let's call a spade a spade...

Since you've got roots from Sine - you should preferably learn the Sineyî dialect... Kak Dyaoko is from Sine (a member of this forum) - let's hope he shows up... :)

The word "Zindegî" is of course correct to use - but we have a fully Kurdish equivalent - so you should use that instead:

Jiyan = Life
Jîn = Living
Dijîm = I live
Dijît = You live

etc.

Excuse me = Bibexşe / Bibore / Daway lêburdin dekem
Please = Bê zehmet
Have a nice day = Roj baş / Rojekî xoş / Em katit baş ("Have a nice time")
Good night = Şew xoş / Şew şad
You're welcome = Ser çawim ("you're welcome on my eye"), "Fermû" ("Please - go ahead") etc.

You should ask more specific questions - like giving a context to the sentences you wish to learn... That way we can find the correct sentences - because as you can see there are many expressions for each of the ones asked for.. :wink:

Şew xoş!
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Sat Mar 15, 2008 7:59 pm

silaw kak sohrab. thank you for the great help. you are right, the term irani should not be used instead of persian but as you can see it has become a habit for me (i have to keep in mind not to do). i reckon the correct term would be fars or even pars(which no one uses anymore). and yes, i would prefer to learn the sineyi dialect but i have never heard anyone use that term before. the only dialects i have heard of are sorani and kurmanci which i really don't know what either of them are. i think sorani is southern kurdish and kurmanci is northern kurdish, but i'm not sure. i would love to learn kurdish words that are pure and that are not loan words so i will definetely use jiyan instead of zindegi. i understand how to use dijim and dijit but how would i say "what are you doing"? i was taught to say "cha akey?" is that correct? also i had a question about some other things. in the sineyi dialect we use the term giyan for example "sohrab giyan" but when i listen to music from northern kurds (i don't know if you have heard of rojin), she uses the term "jan". if you can clear that up for me, it would be a great help. and my last question is on the correct way to say "alot" or "very". in sine they use ferra(which is close to the farsi "faravan") but my friend who is a kurd from mahabad told me zor is the correct word to use. when i watch kurdistan tv, that is the term i hear most, but sometimes they use gilek(which i reckon is turkish, but i'm not sure). thank you for all the help, i really appreciate it. zor spas, matin
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Diri » Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:56 pm

matin123 wrote:silaw kak sohrab. thank you for the great help. you are right, the term irani should not be used instead of persian but as you can see it has become a habit for me (i have to keep in mind not to do). i reckon the correct term would be fars or even pars(which no one uses anymore). and yes, i would prefer to learn the sineyi dialect but i have never heard anyone use that term before. the only dialects i have heard of are sorani and kurmanci which i really don't know what either of them are. i think sorani is southern kurdish and kurmanci is northern kurdish, but i'm not sure. i would love to learn kurdish words that are pure and that are not loan words so i will definetely use jiyan instead of zindegi. i understand how to use dijim and dijit but how would i say "what are you doing"? i was taught to say "cha akey?" is that correct? also i had a question about some other things. in the sineyi dialect we use the term giyan for example "sohrab giyan" but when i listen to music from northern kurds (i don't know if you have heard of rojin), she uses the term "jan". if you can clear that up for me, it would be a great help. and my last question is on the correct way to say "alot" or "very". in sine they use ferra(which is close to the farsi "faravan") but my friend who is a kurd from mahabad told me zor is the correct word to use. when i watch kurdistan tv, that is the term i hear most, but sometimes they use gilek(which i reckon is turkish, but i'm not sure). thank you for all the help, i really appreciate it. zor spas, matin


Em katit baş kak Metîn... :)
Literally means "This time good" = "May this of your times be good"...

"Sineyî", "Mehabadî", etc. are just the names of the cities with the "-î" suffix which is the equivalent of the English "-ian"/"-an" and "-ic" suffixes ("Canadian", "Mexican" and "Bosniac") - in e.g. "something pertaining to Mehabad/Sine"... And in this case, we're speaking of dialects! :)

The right term for the dialect spoke in Sine is "Erdelanî" - because of the Kurdish regional name being "Erdelan". And for Mehabad it's "Mûkriyan" (region) and "Mûkriyanî" (dialect)...

What are you doing? = Çi dikey?

The word "Can" and "Gyan" are the same. They are the same as "Jun" in Persian. I hope you realize that when I write "C" in Kurdish, I don't mean the English "C" sound... Please check out the sticky-thread on this sub-forum (or in the "Babet bi Kurdî" section of the sub-forum), where you will the Kurdish latin alphabet... Here's a quick introduction:

Kurdî - English equivalent sound:
Ş = SH
Ç = CH
C = J
X = KH
J = ZH / French: J
A = AA
E = A
Û = OU
I = Known as "Schwa" in linguistic terms - found in English words such as "Big" or "Bird" - where the "i" is not stressed!
Î = EE
Ê = E

ETC.

Now - "Gyan"/"Can" can mean "Soul", "Dear" and "Life" - depending on context of the use of the word... So in some cases the word means "Soul", while in others it means "Life" or "Dear"... For example "Sohrab gyan" = "Dear Sohrab" - like in Persian "Sohrab jun"...

Kurmancî: "Canê xwe da" Soran: "Gyanî xoy dawe" = "He gave his life" (in e.g. "he died")

Correct, Kurmancî = Northern Kurdish and Soran = Southern Kurdish...

"Gelek" is a purely Kurdish word - Turks say "Çok" = "A lot"

"Zor" is what 90% of all Soranî speakers say, yes - but in Erdelan (Sine and surroundings) Kurds say "Fire" (as you said yourself) - and that is also Kurdish...

"Zor" in Kurmancî, however means "Hard" or "Difficult":

Kurmancî: "Zore" = "It's hard"/"It's difficult"
Soranî: "Zore" = "It's a lot"
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Sun Mar 16, 2008 12:45 am

gelek spas kak sohrab. that was a great help. now i'm not gonna be so confused every time i try to read kurdish in the latin script. mashallah you are very educated in kurdish and you're english is also very good. how many languages do you know? (just wondering)
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Diri » Sun Mar 16, 2008 10:56 am

matin123 wrote:gelek spas kak sohrab. that was a great help. now i'm not gonna be so confused every time i try to read kurdish in the latin script. mashallah you are very educated in kurdish and you're english is also very good. how many languages do you know? (just wondering)


I'm happy to have been of support... :)

And please, do not hesitate to ask if there are any other questions you harbour or if new questions should arise... It's my pleasure to help out somebody who wants to learn and who wishes to know him/herself...

Thank you for your compliments. I speak 4 languages fluently (Kurdish, Norwegian, English & Turkish). Since I don't speak Persian on a daily or even weekly basis, I can't say I "speak" it - but I do understand when others speak it, and I do watch Persian channels with hardly any problems at all (except perhaps some words borrowed from Arabic - which I have to ask my parents about)...

Oh - and the reason why I speak Kurdish so well, is because I was lucky enough to be able to study it here - for 10 years with a teacher and another 3 on my own... My father was a teacher - vali alôn bâzneshaste... :wink:

How many languages do you speak, kak Metîn?
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:08 pm

roj bash kak sohrab. inshallah halaket xase u xeste nebashid. walla the only languages i can say i speak fluently are farsi and english. i understand kurdish to the point that i get an idea of what is being talked about, but not word for word. same thing with aramaic (kurdistani jewish dialect) and hebrew.

with all the information you have, have you ever thought about writing a book on Kurdistan or on the kurdish language? how many years have you been living in norway(if you don't mind me asking)? i was born in los angeles, never been to kurdistan or iran

i also had another question. is there any phrase in kurdish that would be equivalent to "what's up"

once again thank you for your help. rojeki xosh, matin
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Diri » Sun Mar 16, 2008 9:49 pm

matin123 wrote:roj bash kak sohrab. inshallah halaket xase u xeste nebashid. walla the only languages i can say i speak fluently are farsi and english. i understand kurdish to the point that i get an idea of what is being talked about, but not word for word. same thing with aramaic (kurdistani jewish dialect) and hebrew.

with all the information you have, have you ever thought about writing a book on Kurdistan or on the kurdish language? how many years have you been living in norway(if you don't mind me asking)? i was born in los angeles, never been to kurdistan or iran

i also had another question. is there any phrase in kurdish that would be equivalent to "what's up"

once again thank you for your help. rojeki xosh, matin


Roj baş kak Metîn

Lotf dâri junam - kheili motshakeram... Toham intori, inshallah, azizam! :)

Very interesting - how did you learn Aramaic and Hebrew?

I studied Arabic and (biblical) Hebrew at the university... Of these I know Arabic better - and can comprehend simple discussion and the big "picture" or "subject" discussed...

I do also understand German - as much as I do Persian... That's mostly because it comes easy for somebody who speaks both English and a Scandinavian language (which are all closely related to German)... :)

Thank you very much for your kind words - and yes, I do intend to do so... I'd like to do so. Very much, indeed. About Kurdish culture, tradition and language...

No not at all - I've been living here my whole life, so to speak. Since I was 6. So for about 17 years now... I was born in Ûrmiye, though...

Yes, of course - but it all depends on region... In Colemêrg we say "Çi heye çi çinîne?" = "What is [and] what is not?"... Rather philosophical... :lol:

In Soranî some say "Weziyet çone?" = "How is the situation?" (it's Arabic, though). And you use "Vaziyat" in Persian too... Or in other cases "Halê te çawane" = "How is your situation?" or "Çi hale?" = "What's the situation?"... It all depends on which region - and Sine has it's own terms in that respect... But "Weziyet" is very commonly used among Soranî speakers...

Roja te xoştir, birayê delal... :wink:
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Mon Mar 17, 2008 4:55 am

silaw kak sohrab. omidwarem keh xub hastid. thank you once again for your reply. instead of asking you what languages do you speak, i should have asked you what languages don't you speak! :D

i didn't mention before but i am jewish. the jews of sine and i'm guessing all jewish kurds learned aramaic as a first language in the home, kurdish of course because they're in kurdistan, and farsi in the schools. you said you studied arabic and biblical hebrew. aramaic is very similar to both. they say arabic and hebrew are decendants of aramaic. also hezret ibrahim spoke aramaic. i'm not sure if it is the exact same as the aramaic spoken today by jewish kurds, but it is close.

as for hebrew, i'm sure you know that when the iranian revolution took place and khomeini came into power :( most kurdish jews fled from kurdistan to israel. therefore i have many relatives there and i kind of picked up a little bit of the language.

i was meaning to ask you something else as well. i visited istanbul last summer for a few days and i was surprised by how many kurds there were. i wanted to know more about the situation of speaking kurdish in turkey. i met one fellow kurd there and he would speak with me in kurdish very openly but some others were much more reserved. :-k

i wanted to thank you again for your help and i hope you know that i appreciate it. taking the time to help others is a very good deed. inshallah you will always be successful in whatever you choose to do.

shew shad brakem
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Diri » Mon Mar 17, 2008 10:20 am

matin123 wrote:silaw kak sohrab. omidwarem keh xub hastid. thank you once again for your reply. instead of asking you what languages do you speak, i should have asked you what languages don't you speak! :D

i didn't mention before but i am jewish. the jews of sine and i'm guessing all jewish kurds learned aramaic as a first language in the home, kurdish of course because they're in kurdistan, and farsi in the schools. you said you studied arabic and biblical hebrew. aramaic is very similar to both. they say arabic and hebrew are decendants of aramaic. also hezret ibrahim spoke aramaic. i'm not sure if it is the exact same as the aramaic spoken today by jewish kurds, but it is close.

as for hebrew, i'm sure you know that when the iranian revolution took place and khomeini came into power :( most kurdish jews fled from kurdistan to israel. therefore i have many relatives there and i kind of picked up a little bit of the language.

i was meaning to ask you something else as well. i visited istanbul last summer for a few days and i was surprised by how many kurds there were. i wanted to know more about the situation of speaking kurdish in turkey. i met one fellow kurd there and he would speak with me in kurdish very openly but some others were much more reserved. :-k

i wanted to thank you again for your help and i hope you know that i appreciate it. taking the time to help others is a very good deed. inshallah you will always be successful in whatever you choose to do.

shew shad brarekem


Xaste nebashid junam... :)

Terrific... I am honored, my brother... It's a great pleasure, kak Metîn! What a thrill... Thank you so much for paticipating in this forum birakem. I have a special place for Jews (and especially Kurdish Jews) in my heart... :wink:

Indeed Aramaic and Hebrew are close relatives - as two Canaanite languages... At a point in history, Aramaic became the lingua franca in what is now Israel, Syria, Jordan and the surrounding areas... Aramaic borrowed it's alphabet from the Pheonicians - which the Jews then borrowed from the Aramaic - and naturally altered a bit to fit their own needs... Later, much later indeed, Jewish scholars made a system of vowels to use for the Torah (dots and lines beneath the line - while the "o" sound was put as a dot on top of the letters)...

Hebrew is close to Aramaic, yes - but Arabic is slightly further away... Most scholars agree that they are all of the same root (as Semitic languages: Hebrew, Arabic, Aramaic, Assyrian) - but that Arabic developed differently when cut off from the rest on the banks of the Red Sea - and in what today is Yemen, Oman, Djibouti, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and southern Saudi Arabia...

Today there are between 100 and 150 000 Kurdish Jews in Israel - according to some statistics even 160 000 or 200 000... God bless them - they were forced against their will to leave their homeland... Most of these are in Jerusalem - is that where your relatives are too?

Yes, Istanbul... It's said to be the largest Kurdish city... :lol:

It's got a population of + 12 million... And of these, about 4 million are Kurdish... Speaking Kurdish in Turkey was forbidden even publically untill Prime Minister Turgut Özal (himself secretly a Kurd - who confessed his Kurdishness in 1991) - removed the ban - and allowed for Kurds to speak their language in their homes (but not publically in reality - people would still harrass you if you spoke Kurdish outdoors)... And they still do... Many Turks - a substantial number - still dislike Kurds and Kurdish language and everything that's related to them... Because they consider them either of lower class or as separatist (yes - just speaking Kurdish in public (some places) is enough to be lynched as some cases have proven)...

Turkey was founded on the 3 principals: One language, One religion and One people = Turkish language, Turkish religion (Hanafi Sunni Islam) and Turkish people...

Kurds who speak Kurdish in public can face prosecution from the police or resident fascists... So be careful with where you speak in Kurdish in Turkey. Istanbul is generally a liberal place where you will mostly find "good muslims" - who consider all Muslims as equals, but Ankara for example, has it's share of fascists... As does Bursa... I'm not saying Istanbul doesn't have them - just that they're less visible and in lesser numbers, because the city is so large and so mixed with so many different peoples that whoever grows up there can't avoid having a few Kurdish, Armenian or even Greek childhood friends... Hence their more liberal nature... Moreover, the poverty in Istanbul pleads survival rather than elitism and discrimination...

That said, most of the poor people in Istanbul are in fact Kurds... Kurds who moved to Istanbul especially between 1940-1995... Kurdish villages were burned and razed by the thousands in these years - massacres in the 20's, 30's, 80's (in every decade in fact, since the creation of the Turkish republic) also lead to a substantial number of refugees and homeless to urbanize and move to metropol Istanbul - which in Turkey has had a status similar to that of Hollywood... Espeically for Kurds who were looking for a hole to hide in - somewhere to be anonymous...

Turkish assimilation policies included changing the names of every river, valley, village, town, city, mountain, plateu, hill, road, street and lake from Kurdish names to Turkish names... Furthermore, Kurdish culture was banned - dancing, singing and even clothes were prohibited as Atatürk tried to "westernize" and "modernize" Turkey...

Kurds in <Turkey> today (including Nort Kurdistan) are victims of everyday racism, military check-points in Kurdistan, ban on Kurdish given names (for children) and other truly embarrassing policies... Such as the prosecution of 53 Kurdish mayors in North Kurdistan who are now on trial for having written Happy New Year (Newroz) cards in Kurdish... And such as Kurdish municipalities using "W" instead of "V" in "Newroz" - which the Turkish government want's the Kurds to spell as "Nevruz" instead of "Newroz"...

After 83 years of cultural prosecution and national denial - it is not so strange that some Kurds still fear reprisals if they dare speak in Kurdish publically...

You know - Sipasî nawêt (don't need thanks) - I am very happy and honored to know you and to be able to help you out, birayê delal... :)

Anytime!
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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: matin123 » Tue Mar 18, 2008 1:39 am

silaw kak sohrab. shoma hem xaste nebashid! mashallah every time i see your response to my questions i am more and more impressed with how much you know.

i didn't know much about the roots of aramaic, so thank you. i have some relatives in jerusalem, but most of them are in other cities. jeruslalem is very beautiful though.

it's a shame about what's happening in turkey. i knew a bit about the situation, but i didn't know it was so bad. it makes me sad and angry at the same time. i don't know much about ataturk, but in my eyes, he's the same as hitler, saddam, khomeini, etc. i once read that ataturk said "kurds are just turks who got lost in the mountains and forgot who they were" ...this is who the turks look up to and admire so you can't really expect much more (except stupidity and ignorance) from the government or the people who support it.

inshallah one day Kurdistan will be free, what else can i say?

dubare, zor spas bo komakit

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Re: Can someone please help me?

PostAuthor: Diri » Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:31 pm

matin123 wrote:silaw kak sohrab. shoma hem xaste nebashid! mashallah every time i see your response to my questions i am more and more impressed with how much you know.

i didn't know much about the roots of aramaic, so thank you. i have some relatives in jerusalem, but most of them are in other cities. jeruslalem is very beautiful though.

it's a shame about what's happening in turkey. i knew a bit about the situation, but i didn't know it was so bad. it makes me sad and angry at the same time. i don't know much about ataturk, but in my eyes, he's the same as hitler, saddam, khomeini, etc. i once read that ataturk said "kurds are just turks who got lost in the mountains and forgot who they were" ...this is who the turks look up to and admire so you can't really expect much more (except stupidity and ignorance) from the government or the people who support it.

inshallah one day Kurdistan will be free, what else can i say?

dubare, zor spas bo komakit

matin


Silaw kak Metîn can... Ew demê te baş! =)

Motshakeram berâdaram! I'm flattered... Thank you very much - birayê delal!

Actually you're quite right. The problem with Turkey is not the people - but the leadership. Of course this leadership brainwashes the man on the street to think in certain ways. Not to mention the educational system which imprints state-propaganda into their brains from childhood and all the way to higher education (university, college etc.)...

All children have to line up in the schoolyard in every morning and sing "Istiklal Marşi" - which is a kind of national anthem, in which children are made to swear on the Turkish flag and Ataturk and sing that they are proud Turks...

Amîn to those words, brother... And there is a Jewish proverb: "From your mouth to G-d's ears!" :wink:

Sipasî nawêt birayê şirîn! :)
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Shaswar
Shaswar
 
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