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Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

Let's learn Turkish

Discuss about language(s) in English

How well can you speak Turkish?

A) None
2
15%
B) A little
6
46%
C) Fair well
1
8%
D) Very well
4
31%
 
Total votes : 13

PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:13 am

http://www.turkishinterpreter.co.uk/for ... r&Itemid=8



TURKISH ALPHABET



The Turkish Alphabet has 29 letters, 8 of which are vowels and 21 of which are consonants.




A B C Ç D E F G Ğ H



I İ J K L M N O Ö P



R S Ş T U Ü V Y Z
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PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:14 am

http://www.turkishinterpreter.co.uk/for ... r&Itemid=8



NOTES ON THE TURKISH ALPHABET



The Turkish Alphabet:



It has 29 letters most of which are the same as the ones in English. There are some exceptions as listed below:



ç, ğ, ö, ş, ü

çam /cham/, bağ /bagh/, öz /3Z/, ün /yun/, şey /shey/


Turkish Sound System:


Although Turkish does not share the same family of language with English, the majority of its sounds are the same as the ones in English, except for ğ, ü sounds. Different from English, the Turkish language doesn’t have th (thanks or father), w (want), x, (six) and q (quote).


Unlike English, Turkish is a phonemic language, which means that sounds do not vary according to their position in a word. For example:


All the e sounds in the word teneke is pronounced as /e/ (as in Ken), but the same word would be pronounced as /tenıkı/ according to the English sound system. For this reason, once mastered, Turkish pronounciation will appeal to new Turkish as Foreign Language learners.


If you read the article attached, you will be able to approach this issue from the point of view of a native Turkish speaker trying to learn English as a foreign language.
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PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:28 am

http://www.onlineturkish.com/alphabet.asp

The Turkish Alphabet
The Turkish alphabet contains 29 letters. There are 8 vowels and 21 consonants. Although letters Q, W, X do not appear, there are 6 more letters, namely; Ç, Ğ, Ş, Ö, Ü, I. The other letters are the same in both alphabets, but they are pronounced differently.

NOTE: Please notice the letters [i, İ and ı, I]

Minuscule Capital Minuscule Capital
i İ ı I



Turkish Alphabet With Sounds

*Attention to the first users!

It takes a couple of minutes to listen the sound files since the MP3 files needs

to be downloaded to your computer first.



1. Click on the icon to listen the whole text

or

2. Click on the letters to listen them separately


A - a as in "ugly "

B - be as in "bell"

C - ce as in "jealous"

Ç – çe as in "chair"

D - de as in "decade"

E - e as in "elephant"

F - fe as in "federal"

G - ge as in "get"

Ğ – ğe*

H - he as in "helicopter"

I - ı as in "number"

İ - i as in "insect"

J - je as in "azure" (garaj = garage, pronounced as in French & English)

K - ke as in "kettle"

L - le as in "leg"

M - me as in "men"

N - ne as in "never"

O - o as in "orchestra"

Ö - ö as in "urge"

P - pe as in "pen"

R - re as in "red"

S - se as in "sell"

Ş - şe as in "shelf"

T - te as in "telephone"

U - u as in "oops!"

Ü – ü as in "fruit, nude"

V - ve as in "vegetable"

Y - ye as in "yes"

Z - ze as in "zebra"

*NOT: Türkçe'de Ğ harfi ile başlayan kelime yoktur.

*NOTE: There is no word that begins with the letter Ğ in Turkish.



Start learning Turkish today!
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PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:38 am

A simple analysis of sentence structure in Turkish

June : Merhaba!

Carol : Merhaba!

June : Adın ne?

Carol : Adım Carol.


June : Hello!

Carol: Hello!

June : What is your name?

Carol : My name is Carol.


There is no obvious “to be” (am, is, are) in Turkish. As is understood from the example above, by adding Turkish possessive adjectives such as -im, -ım (my); -in, -ın (your) to the noun, we can show possession.


Adın ne? / Adınız ne? = What is your name?


The difference between Adın ne? and Adınız ne? is that Adınız ne? is more polite and formal.
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PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:42 am

The dative case

( -e / -a)

The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given. That is, it marks the recepient of action and can be used with prepositions or other function words corresponding in meaning to English to and for. But some other English prepositions like in, into, at, on, onto etc can correspond in meaning to the dative case in Turkish. For this reason, it’s better to understand this case from the examples below.

1- It’s added to nouns to indicate place or direction:

Examples:

Okul-a gidiyorum.

(I am going to school.)

Otobüs-e binelim.

(Let’s get on the bus.)

Ali, bugün iş-e gelmiyor.

(Ali isn’t coming to work today.)

Note: If the word ends with a vowel, then we insert y or n between the dative case marker and the word.

Araba-y-a bak.

(Look at the car.)

Mehtap, annesi-n-e hediye aldı.

(Mehtap has bought a present for her mother.)

Kitabı çanta-y-a koy.

(Put the book into the bag.)

2- It is used to make question words like Nereye = ( to) Where? and Kime = (to) Whom?.

A: Nereye gidiyorsun? (Where are you going?)

B: Parka gidiyorum. (I am going to the park.)

A: Kime gülüyorsun? (Who are you laughing at?)

B: Arif’e gülüyorum. (I am laughing at Arif.)

3- It is used with post-positions like -e/-a doğru = towards, -e/-a kadar = until / as far as.

Markete doğru yürüyorum.

(I am walking towards the market.)

Köpek bize doğru geliyor.

(The dog is coming towards us.)

Dün gecen saat 3’e kadar ders çalıştım.

(I studied until 3 o’clock last night.)

Otobüs Hatay’a kadar gidiyor.

(The bus is going as far as Hatay.)

4- It is added to personal pronouns.

Ben (I) → Bana (to/at/for) me

Sen (You) → Sana (to/at/for) you

O (S/He/It) → Ona (to/at/for) her/him/it

Biz (We) → Bize (to/at/for) us

Siz (You) → Size (to/at/for you

Onlar (They → Onlara (to/at/for) them

Bana bir kalem ver.

(Give me a pencil.)

(Give a pencil to me.)

Andrew, dün bize geldi.

(Andrew came to us yesterday.)

Sana bir hediye aldım.

(I bought you a present.)

(I bought a present for you.)

Ona selam söyle.

(Say hello to him.)

The uses of the dative case explained and exemplified above are the essentials particular to this grammatical structure. There are some other uses of the dative case in Turkish. But as we haven’t covered other related grammatical structures, we’ll stop here.

Go to Exercises
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PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:46 am

http://www.turkishinterpreter.co.uk/for ... r&Itemid=8

TURKISH GRAMMAR EXERCISES

Personal Pronoun Endings Post-positions
Present Continuous Tense
Past Tense
Present Tense Future Tense -ebilmek/

-abilmek
The Necessitative Mood Tense
The verb "hoşuna gitmek''


Exercise-1


Exercise-1

(-de,-da,-te,-ta)


Exercise-1

(Subject & Verb Agreement)


Exercise-1

(Subject & Verb Agreement)
Exercise-1


Exercise-1

(-ecek/-acak)


Exercise-1

(-ebilmek/-abilmek)


Exercise-1

(-meli/-malı)


Exercise-1


Exercise-2


Exercise-2

(-ın altında)


Exercise-2

(Subject & Verb Agreement)


Exercise-2

(Subject & Verb Agreement)


Exercise-2



Exercise-2

(-meli/-malı)


Exercise-3

(-in önünde)


Exercise-3

(Past & Present Mixed)



Exercise-4

(-in üstünde)


Exercise-5

(-in yanında)


Exercise-6

(-in karşısında)
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PostAuthor: schoolmaster1954 » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:52 am

http://www.turkishinterpreter.co.uk/for ... r&Itemid=8

LISTENING & READING

The aim of this section is to provide you with listening materials to help you improve your listening skills in Turkish. Each of the audios has been made with the intention of assisting you to practice listening to conversations including certain grammatical elements. In addition, you will find stories narrated for you. All of the audios are accompanied by an audio-script.

To Download these files, right click on the link and select the “Save Target As” option.

Conversations & Stories
Audio & Video Files
Audio/Video-scripts

Sentences in the present continuous tense (11 December 2006)

Present continuous tense: dialogue-1

Some general expressions in Turkish

Basic sentences: video-1

A Story: Kral ve Bülbül ( The King and the Nightingale)-Section-1

A Story: Kral ve Bülbül ( The King and the Nightingale)-Section-2

-ebilmek / -abilmek: Dialogue-1

Simple past tense: Dialogue-1
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PostAuthor: Amanc » Fri Dec 29, 2006 9:30 pm

strange, every time i post LETS LEARN KURDISH in turkish forums, the topic dissapears and i get banned :roll: hmmmm we must be different, kurds and turks...
What if tomorrow never comes and you don't know how I feel?
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PostAuthor: Diri » Fri Dec 29, 2006 10:01 pm

Amanc wrote:strange, every time i post LETS LEARN KURDISH in turkish forums, the topic dissapears and i get banned :roll: hmmmm we must be different, kurds and turks...



Yeah... Tell me about it... Kurds are too tolerant for their own good... :roll:
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PostAuthor: cazyun » Sat Dec 30, 2006 6:21 am

maybe in a friednly way it can work...but kurdish has borowed alot from persian dont forget it its kind of assimilation

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PostAuthor: Diri » Sat Dec 30, 2006 11:58 pm

cazyun wrote:maybe in a friednly way it can work...but kurdish has borowed alot from persian dont forget it its kind of assimilation



What are you talking about?

Did French borrow from Italian? Or maybe Spanish borrowed from French?

Well let's see:

English|French|Spanish|Italian

"Night"|"Nuit"|"Noche"|"Notte"

Oh my GOD... :roll: Who borrowed from WHO??? :wink:
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PostAuthor: Parsi » Sun Dec 31, 2006 12:00 am

cazyun wrote:maybe in a friednly way it can work...but kurdish has borowed alot from persian dont forget it its kind of assimilation


Kurdish and Persian are in the same family - they have the same roots so there is no "borrowing" per say - just sharing.

And Turkish has borrowed a lot from Aryan and Semitic languages too, especially Istanbuli, Azeri, and Ozbek. :roll:
Look to your history and roots to find your true self.

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PostAuthor: Xoshewist » Sun Dec 31, 2006 12:01 am

i can understand farsi if i listen really carefully. 70% is all the same
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PostAuthor: Parsi » Sun Dec 31, 2006 12:10 am

Xoshewist wrote:i can understand farsi if i listen really carefully. 70% is all the same


Depends...which Kurdi do you speak??
Look to your history and roots to find your true self.

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PostAuthor: Xoshewist » Sun Dec 31, 2006 12:18 am

sorani :wink:

and yeah, i think its realy hard ton understand it for people who speak kirmanci or another dialect.
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