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Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

This is where you can talk about every subject (previously it was called shout room)

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:11 pm

Baby elephant rescued by a JCB
after falling into a abandoned well


This is the incredible moment that a baby elephant and its mother are rescued by a JCB digger after falling into an abandoned well in India

The video, which was filmed yesterday in Sambalpur, eastern India, shows the mother elephant and its calf in the enormous pool of muddy grey water.

They cannot get out because of steep mud banks on every side and so the digger digs away in an attempt to create a less steep way of escape.

This is the incredible moment that a baby elephant and its mother are rescued by a JCB digger after falling into an abandoned well in Sambalpur, eastern India. They cannot get out because of steep mud banks on every side and so the digger digs away in an attempt to create a less steep way of escape

As the digger works on the mud, the mother waits in the water with the calf clinging as close as possible to her.

The calf is so small that its head only just gets above the water.

With a pathway now more visible, the mother tries to scramble up the bank but slips back into the water.

As the digger works on the mud, the mother waits in the water with the calf clinging as close as possible to her. With a pathway now more visible, the mother tries to scramble up the bank but slips back into the water

However, on her second attempt, she climbs diagonally along the bank before making a loud sound with her trunk.

Residents who had gathered to watch at the side of the well then scatter out of the way.

After the calf had also scrambled out of the well, it followed its mother into the forest.

Officials said the entire operation to rescue the elephants, which fell into the well the night before, took a little over three hours.

However, on her second attempt, she climbs diagonally along the bank before making a loud sound with her trunk. After the calf had also scrambled out of the well, it followed its mother into the forest

Link to Article - Video:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... -well.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Apr 30, 2019 12:45 pm

Glimpsing a world beyond human extinction

Stand on solid ground and look down at your feet. Go deeper - through the flesh and bones, deeper into the Earth. What's down there? It's hard to imagine, let alone visit - should you want to

Writer and explorer Robert MacFarlane has been voyaging in this hidden world, going back in "deep time" to places measured in "millennia, epochs and aeons, instead of minutes, months and years".

Now, he has surfaced and is asking: "What will we leave behind when we are extinct?"

And he is telling us why we should care.

To MacFarlane, this image of cars in a mine could be "an annunciation scene from Giotto".

But look more closely - in fact, it's an "avalanche of vehicles".

He abseiled down into an abandoned Welsh slate mine where locals have been dumping wrecked cars for 40 years. He says: "We are not just shaping the surface, but shaping the depth."

Will our future fossils just be "car-chives" like this, along with the inevitable strata of plastic, lethal nuclear waste, and the spines of millions of intensively farmed cows and pigs?

Or can we, as a species, start to do things better?

As a Swedish teenager, Greta Thunberg, inspires worldwide climate-breakdown protests, and Extinction Rebellion brings central London to a standstill, it seems a good time to be looking at what MacFarlane calls the "under-land", and to be asking ourselves: "Will we be good ancestors?"

Ice, says MacFarlane, "holds incredible knowledge". So, in 2016, after the warmest summer on record in the Arctic, he dropped down into a fissure in a melting glacier to learn lessons from it.

Shafts in the ice such as this one, in the Knud Rasmussen glacier on the east coast of Greenland, are called "moulin" (the French word for "mill"). They are formed when the ice thaws and meltwater bores its way in. Scientists now use them to measure how quickly the glaciers and the ice caps are thawing.

Entering through its mouth, MacFarlane dropped 60ft (18m). He had time to look around, to be astonished, before getting caught in the torrent of meltwater and giving the agreed signal to "get me... out of here".

The deeper you go, the deeper the blue - and the older the ice. MacFarlane says: "As you drop down, you drop further back in time." In a few minutes, he had travelled several hundred years.

"It felt like being inside a vast alien creature… a humming blue tube," he says.

MacFarlane says he was "calm and serene" - before being spun out of control. "It was beautiful," he says, "except when I was getting absolutely hammered by the meltwater stream, penduluming me out and smashing me back in."

Climate change is making the glaciers retreat so quickly that, according to MacFarlane, locals in the tiny settlement of Kulusuk, in Greenland, now can't hear when it "calves" - when vast pieces of it shear off. Not so long ago, this sporadic thunder used to be part of their soundscape.

MacFarlane says: "The sense of rapidity and change up there is enormous."

He forms a globe with his hands, representing the Earth and its ice-covered poles, and says of rising sea levels: "At the moment, the fate of the ice is the fate of us."

But it's not, thankfully, a tale entirely about looming annihilation. MacFarlane says he didn't have to travel far from his home, in Cambridge, to find a world "humming with mystery and miracle".

In Epping Forest, I hear about his walks there with an ecologist who taught him about the "wood wide web", a name given to the subterranean relationship between plants and fungi - also known as the "kingdom of the grey".

He smiles at the softness of the spring beech leaves. "An extraordinary social network is happening just 20cm [8in] under our feet," he says.

"Rather than a lot of individual trees, it is a community.

"Knowing this changes the ground you walk on."

The human world wide web has existed for less than 30 years.

The roots of plants and fungi mycorrhizal have been communicating with and helping each other for 400 million.

It clearly works - fungi were the first organisms to return to the blast site around Hiroshima. They seem to be in no danger of going extinct.

MacFarlane believes that learning from the wood wide web, learning to "speak in spores", could help save humans.

Gaze down in to Onkalo, a nuclear fuel repository in Finland, designed to bury something that needs to be kept from humanity forever - nuclear waste.

Onkalo means "The Hiding Place." Its chambers are being excavated 1,500ft below ground, inside 1.9-billion-year-old rock on the west coast of Finland.

Surely a deeply depressing place to visit? But MacFarlane says that he was "oddly and unexpectedly lifted".

Radioactive waste can remain dangerous to humans for tens of thousands of years.

This structure will need to outlast the people building it - by millennia - perhaps even the species that designed it.

MacFarlane says: "I went there expecting apocalypse, to be the darkest place that I had ever reached, where we put the worst we have ever made - but it was one of the most hopeful places I ever reached."

"It was an example of cooperation and communication.

"It's an incredibly complex task - the pyramids have only lasted 5,000 years.

"And there was a sort of success that was born of deep time thinking engineering, scientific expertise and community cooperation.

"The thinking that is being done at Onkalo is an example of how to be good ancestors.

"And that is a question we need to be asking ourselves all the time now."
Paris catacombs Image copyright © Laura Brown

MacFarlane also met some of the denizens of the "invisible city" below Paris.

There are 200 miles of catacombs and quarries beneath the streets of the the French capital.

He spent three days navigating the labyrinth, sometimes having to turn his skull sideways to go "lizarding" forwards. It was the longest he had spent without sun or sky.

MacFarlane likens this sculpture to humanity's current existential struggle with climate change.

"This figure is half stepping out of ancient stone and half into the air of the present, half caught between these two states, unable to advance or retreat," he says.

These are notebooks from a decade of underland exploration: words also written during the hunt for the origins of the universe in an ice laboratory beneath the Yorkshire moors, while deep in ancient mines in the Mendip Hills, mountaineering to a remote Arctic "cave-art" site in Norway, and descending to a "starless river" in the Slovenian highlands.

Having now shaped all this in to a book, called Underland, hasn't he ended up wondering why we should bother caring about how we live? Humans will just die out soon anyway.

No. MacFarlane believes that a deep time awareness should, at its best, "provoke us to action not apathy".

It should help us, he says, "to see ourselves as part of a web of gift, inheritance and legacy stretching over millions of years past and millions to come, bringing us to consider what we are leaving behind for the epochs and beings that will follow us".

An artist carved this owl from the rib bone of a minke whale, washed up on a beach in the Hebrides.

He gave it to the writer on one condition - that he carry it with him as a talisman, to help him see in the dark.

Did it work?

"Yes," he says, "in that I learned not just how to see in the dark but also to see the dark, as it were."

And?

"We are a brilliant, terrible species."

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-48054033
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu May 02, 2019 8:59 am

54 lions killed in two days
Horror find at South African farm

By: Lord Ashcroft

It was the overpowering stench and the thick swarm of flies that told Reinet Meyer she had stumbled upon something truly horrific

Meyer, a senior inspector at the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, had been tipped off that lions were being left in tiny cages at the Wag-'n-Bietjie farm, 32km outside Bloemfontein in South Africa's Free State Province.

Knowing that her country's controversial lion breeding industry supplies the appalling international trade in lion bones meant she was expecting the worse. But nothing could prepare her for the grotesque and macabre scene she found inside an anonymous-looking farm shed.

The building was being used as a lion slaughterhouse, and a supervisor and eight workers were stripping the skin and flesh from the fresh carcasses of a group of recently killed lions.

Dead lions, some skinned and others waiting to be skinned, littered the blood-stained floor. A pile of innards and skeletons lay elsewhere inside, while discarded internal body parts were piled high in overflowing black plastic bags on a trailer outside.

Photographs taken by investigators showed a squalid scene of gore. Many are too horrific to be shown.

"It was shocking," Meyer said. "We couldn't believe what was happening. You could smell the blood. The lions got shot in the camp and then were all brought into this one room. The flies were terrible.

"For me, a lion is a stately animal, a kingly animal. Here he is butchered for people just to make money, it's absolutely disgusting."

About 200 yards from the abattoir, two lions were housed in steel transport crates that were too small for them to stand up or turn around in. Meyer said they had been left in the crates without food or water for three days.

She initially thought that one of them was dead because it was not moving.

"The lion was so depressed that it did not move at all. It was totally disgusting that they were kept like this.

"A lion is a wild animal, it wants its freedom but now it's kept in a small cage for three days. It's absolutely deplorable."

A total of 54 lions had been killed at the farm in just two days. They were first shot with tranquiliser darts before being shot dead with a .22-calibre rifle. It is understood the bullets were shot through the ear and directly into the brains because overseas buyers will not pay for damaged skulls.

Some of the lions are believed to have been trucked about 400km to the farm from a "safari park" near Johannesburg.

Remarkably, the workers at Wag-'n-Bietjie are allowed to kill lions. The site, owned by lion breeder Andre Steyn, is one of a series of licensed lion slaughterhouses in South Africa which supply the huge demand for lion bones from South East Asia. South Africa allows 800 captive-bred lion skeletons to be exported each year, but campaigners believe many more are illegally slaughtered to feed the disgusting, but lucrative, trade.

Wag-'n-Bietjie, which calls itself an "eco-farm" that puts "nature first", appears to have been issued the relevant permits by the Free State.

Steyn, who is a former council member of the South African Predator Association, a trade organisation for the captive breeding industry, gave Meyer unfettered access to his property.

But along with his foreman Johan van Dyke, he now faces animal welfare charges related to the two lions kept in small cages, and may face further charges related to the way lions were being killed and the squalid condition of the abattoir.

What will happen to the 246 lions found at the farm remains unclear. About 100 were reportedly marked for slaughter, but the farm's permits have been revoked. Their fate will not be decided until Steyn and Van Dyke's court case concludes.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/a ... xk_alGVXcY
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu May 02, 2019 1:23 pm

UK can cut emissions to nearly zero

Recent protests have helped change attitudes towards climate change

The UK should lead the global fight against climate change by cutting greenhouse gases to nearly zero by 2050, a report says.

The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) maintains this can be done at no added cost from previous estimates.

Its report says that if other countries follow the UK, there’s a 50-50 chance of staying below the recommended 1.5C temperature rise by 2100.

A 1.5C rise is considered the threshold for dangerous climate change.

Some say the proposed 2050 target for near-zero emissions is too soft, but others will fear the goal could damage the UK's economy.

The CCC - the independent adviser to government on climate change - said it would not be able to hit “net zero“ emissions any sooner, but 2050 was still an extremely significant goal.

The main author Chris Stark told me: “This report would have been absolutely inconceivable just a few years ago. People would have laughed us out of court for suggesting that the target could be so high.”

The main change, he said, was the huge drop in the cost of renewable energy prompted by government policies to nurture solar and wind power.

He said the BBC's David Attenborough climate documentary, protests by Extinction Rebellion and speeches by the teenage campaigner Greta Thunberg had persuaded the public that the problem needed urgent action.

But Mr Stark said there was no way the 2050 target would be achieved unless the government backed it with policies and money.

He noted that the UK was already slipping away from a legal obligation to cut its emissions step-by-step between now and 2032.

The cost of the new proposal, the CCC estimates, is tens of billions of pounds a year and may reach to 1-2% of national wealth (as measured by GDP) each year by 2050. That doesn’t count the benefits of decarbonisation - such as cleaner air and water.

The CCC said England can eliminate emissions by 2050, while Scotland could go carbon-free sooner - by 2045. Scotland has exceptional potential for planting trees (which absorb carbon dioxide) and is more suited for carbon capture and storage.

Wales can only cut 95% of its emissions by 2050 because of its farm industry. Northern Ireland will follow England’s targets.

The government is studying the report, which has substantial implications for public finances, and says it "sets us on a path to become the first major economy to legislate to end our contribution to global warming entirely".

How do you reach zero emissions?

The plan is for “net zero“ emissions by 2050, which means balancing carbon emissions with carbon removal. In practice, we'll need to slash the amount of CO2 we put in the atmosphere.

Unavoidable emissions need to be captured and stored (for example, where CO2 is collected from a power station chimney and put underground) or offset by planting trees.

Until now, the target had been to reduce emissions by 80% compared with 1990 levels by 2050.
Chart showing the breakdown of household emissions in 1990, 2017 and 2050

How this affects you

The CCC believes that achieving zero emissions depends on low-carbon technologies and changes to industry, and public behaviour.

Here are some of the report's recommendations for the public.

Home heating

The report has one controversial recommendation: to turn down the home thermostat to 19C in winter.

We will need to insulate our homes much better. Some of us will use heat pumps - a sort of reverse refrigeration technology that sucks warmth from the ground - and convert natural gas boilers to hydrogen ones.

The committee expects consumer bills to rise at first, then fall as a newer, cheaper electricity generators are introduced.

Flying

The aviation industry is trying to bring down the cost of making jet fuels from waste materials.

But the CCC says this won’t be enough. The number of flights we take is increasing, and the report predicts that government action will be needed to constrain the growth.

However, it doesn’t say how – and the committee chair, John Gummer, ducked a question about Heathrow expansion at the report's launch.

Cars

The report say we won't need to overhaul our motoring habits, but eventually we will be driving electric cars.

The government has set a target date of 2040 beyond which conventional car sales will be banned. However, the committee says that deadline should be 2030.

Meat

The committee notes many people are already eating less red meat for the health of the planet and themselves.

It says people can reduce their diet-related emissions by 35% if they transition from a high-meat diet to a low-meat one. But it only predicts a 20% drop in meat consumption by 2050.

Waste

Bio-degradable waste should not be sent to landfill after 2025. This means we would all be obliged to separate our food waste from other rubbish. The report recommends reducing food waste as far as possible.

What else can I do?

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionStrangers are sharing unwanted food in a bid to save money and reduce food waste.

The CCC says people can also take the following steps:

    Choosing to walk, cycle or take public transport

    Choosing LED light-bulbs and electric appliances with high energy efficiency ratings

    Setting the water temperature in their heating systems to no higher than 55C

    Using only peat-free compost

    Choosing quality products that last longer and sharing rather than buying items, like power tools, that are used infrequently

    Checking your pension funds and ISAs to see if your investments support low-carbon industries
Which businesses and sectors would be affected?

The big push is to decarbonise industry and heat generation. Carbon capture technology will be needed on many of the major emitters: the steel, paper, aluminium and paper industries.

Farmers would need to find ways to reduce methane emissions from cows.

Agriculture is a major emitter of greenhouse gases through sheep and cattle burping methane, and from fertilisers.

Farmers would need to reduce the amount of land in pasture, increase woodland, and feed cattle food that creates less methane gas.

The fracking industry would also be affected - the committee says we should only use fracked gas in the UK if it replaces gas that would otherwise be imported.

What's been the response?

Environmental groups are supportive - although many think 2050 is too conservative.

The UK Health Alliance on Climate Change has called on the government to adopt the recommendations but "adopt a net-zero target before 2050".

Lorna Greenwood of Extinction Rebellion told me: "2050 condemns us to a bleak future... Others are already dying round the world thanks to inaction and far-off target setting."

The environmental campaign group WWF has said: “The problem is, we’ve been acting as if we have time. But if we want a world with coral reefs, safe coastal cities and enough food for everyone, we must act now."

Chart showing progress in reducing emissions across different sectors

Business and industry groups have expressed support but argue they need government help.

Rain Newton-Smith, chief economist at the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) said: “The UK should do all it can to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change. What we need now is a supportive and timely response from the government to enact this ambitious target."

Meanwhile, Minette Batters, president of the farm union NFU, told me: “We take the climate issue very seriously. With Brexit and the government’s Agriculture Bill the government can shift farm support towards helping farmers reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Meanwhile, Dr Shaun Fitzgerald, director of The Royal Institution, said: “I am a massive supporter of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

But he added: "Will people be prepared to set their winter time thermostat to 19C? Asking people to put up with a reduction in comfort/quality is going to be difficult."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48122911
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu May 02, 2019 2:05 pm

Climate change dictionary
What do all the terms mean?


Climate change is seen as the biggest challenge to the future of human life on Earth, and understanding the scientific language used to describe it can sometimes feel just as difficult

But help is at hand. Use our translator tool to find out what some of the words and phrases relating to climate change mean.

Ten key terms:

1.5 degrees

    Keeping the rise in global average temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius will avoid the worst impacts of climate change, scientists say

    That's compared with 'pre-industrial times'. The world has already warmed about 1C since then

Climate change

    A pattern of change affecting global or regional climate, as measured by average temperature and rainfall, and how often extreme weather events like heatwaves or heavy rains happen.

    This variation may be caused by both natural processes and by humans. Global warming is an informal term used to describe climate change caused by humans.

Carbon footprint

    The amount of carbon emitted by an individual or organisation in a given period of time, or the amount of carbon emitted during the manufacture of a product

Carbon neutral

    A process where there is no net release of CO2. For example, growing biomass takes CO2 out of the atmosphere, while burning it releases the gas again

    The process would be carbon neutral if the amount taken out and the amount released were identical. A company or country can also achieve carbon neutrality by means of carbon offsetting

Emissions

    Emissions are any release of gases such as carbon dioxide which cause global warming, a major cause of climate change

    They can be small-scale in the form of exhaust from a car or methane from a cow, or larger-scale such as those from coal-burning power stations and heavy industries

Feedback loop

    In a feedback loop, rising temperatures on the Earth change the environment in ways that affect the rate of warming

    Feedback loops can be positive (adding to the rate of warming), or negative (reducing it)

    As the Arctic sea-ice melts, the surface changes from being a bright reflective white to a darker blue or green which allows more of the Sun's rays to be absorbed. So less ice means more warming and more melting

Global warming

    The steady rise in global average temperature in recent decades, which experts believe is largely caused by human-produced greenhouse gas emissions

    The long-term trend continues upwards, scientists say, even though the warmest year on record, according to the UK's Met Office, is 2016

Geo-engineering

    Geo-engineering is any technology that could be used to halt or even reverse climate change

    Examples range from extracting carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground to more far-fetched ideas such as deploying vast mirrors in space to deflect the Sun's rays

    Some scientists say geo-engineering may prove essential because not enough is being done to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases

    Others warn that the technologies are unproven and could have unforeseen consequences

IPCC

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is a scientific body established by the United Nations and the World Meteorological Organization

    Its role is to examine and assess the latest scientific research into climate change. Its report in 2018 warned that the rise in global temperatures should be limited to 1.5C to avoid dangerous impacts

Runaway climate change

    Describes how climate change may suddenly get worse after passing a 'tipping point', making it even harder to stop or reverse

    In 2018, the IPCC said that global emissions must be reduced by 45% by 2030, and to net zero by 2050 to have 50% chance of limiting temperature rises to 1.5C this century
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri May 03, 2019 10:06 pm

The schoolgirls seeking to save the world

This Friday, like many Fridays before it, Haven Coleman will not be attending school. The 13-year-old is taking a stand

Coleman, from Denver, Colorado, is risking her education to strike for climate change action. She told the BBC her decision was down to one person: Greta Thunberg.

"Once we found Greta, we were like, 'Oh that's amazing, let me try, let me do something similar'," Coleman said.

When Thunberg sat outside Sweden's parliament on 20 August, 2018, aged 15, she cut a lonely figure. Carrying a "school strike for climate change" sign, she said she was refusing to attend classes until Swedish politicians took action.

Nine months on, Thunberg is no longer alone. Energised by her climate strike movement, Fridays for Future (FFF), students are vowing to boycott school on Fridays until their countries adhere to the 2015 Paris agreement, which aims to prevent global temperatures from rising 1.5C (34.7F) above pre-industrial levels.

On 15 March, an estimated 1.6 million students from 125 countries walked out of school to demand climate change action. The next co-ordinated international protest takes place on Friday, before another global strike on 24 May.

Coleman, the co-director of US Youth Climate Strike, is one of them. She founded the organisation with Isra Hirsi, the 16-year-old daughter of Democratic congresswoman Ilhan Omar, and Alexandria Villaseñor, 13.

"It's really cool because it's driven by girls. I think that's amazing," she said.

Based on the "tonnes of people" she knows within the movement, she believes girls outnumber boys. Learning about the effects of deforestation on sloths - her "favourite animal" - was her gateway into climate activism.

But it was Thunberg's school walk-out, she said, that prompted her to start striking on her own.

So she began descending the steps of the Denver Capitol Building every Friday with her "school for climate strike" placard. With the help of Hirsi, who's from Minneapolis, and Villaseñor, who's from New York, she led a nationwide strike on 15 March across all 50 states.

Coleman takes a dim view of adults like Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who believes she should be in school, not out protesting. Her assessment of world leaders was damning - she accused them of patronising her and being frozen by the fear of change.

Youth strikers were "turning this fear into action", she said. "We're trying to fix a mess that adults can still fix."

Coleman's organisation, US Youth Climate Strike, is backing the New Green Deal (NGD) - a policy proposal to reduce carbon emissions by transforming the US economy. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest congresswoman in history at 29, is an enthusiastic supporter of the policy initiative, although convincing others of its merits has proved more difficult.

Ms Ocasio-Cortez's NGD resolution was roundly rejected by the Senate in March, defeated by 57 votes to zero. Republican lawmakers, some of whom do not believe in man-made climate change, have branded the NGD a "socialist manifesto".

Their resistance illustrates the political realities facing young climate activists. For all the young strikers' passion, it is politicians who are navigating the economic and practical complexities of shifting the global economy away from fossil fuels and towards a carbon-free future.

There is overwhelming scientific consensus that climate change is caused by human behaviour, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a UN body. A 2016 study of peer-reviewed journals said the IPCC's position was shared by 97% of actively publishing climate scientists. Most leading scientific organisations, including NASA, the American Meteorological Society and the UK Met Office, agree.

To minimise the risks, global carbon emissions must be cut by 50% within the next 11 years, a landmark UN report warned last year. If temperatures go beyond the 1.5C threshold, experts fear climate change could become unstoppable by 2030 - by which time Lilly Platt will be 22.

Platt, who is 11 and lives in the Netherlands, is impatient for change. "I'm in the generation that has to suffer through this," she told the BBC.

Accompanied by her mum, she strikes on Fridays for an hour with permission from her school.

Her protests, held outside her local town hall in Utrecht, were about "educating and informing people about climate change", she said. She is a child ambassador for the Plastic Pollution Coalition and HOW Global, a water charity.

And she has her own litter-picking campaign, Lilly's Plastic Pick Up. Started in 2015, when Platt was seven, it focuses on "informing people about single-use plastic and how they can stop using it".

She too cited Thunberg as the inspiration for her first school climate strike. But she is now well known in her own right - she has more than 6,600 followers on Twitter. Is there a reason girls like her are spearheading climate movements?

"I think it's because we're inspiring more people. You have to lead by example," she said.

In many cases, it is the developing countries that contribute least to global fossil fuel emissions that are likely to suffer most from climate change.

Leah Namugerwa is a 14-year-old FFF activist in Kampala, the capital of Uganda. Her country, like many others in Africa, is at risk of desertification - a process that causes fertile agricultural land to turn barren. Experts say droughts and elevated temperatures - two factors linked to climate change - cause it to occur.

At the age of 12, Namugerwa watched TV news reports about Uganda's devastating famine of 2017, when exceptional drought conditions left millions in need of food aid. Horrified by the scale of suffering, she felt compelled to act. Inspired by Thunberg, she held her debut protest on 1 February this year and has been striking every Friday since.

"I wanted to make a positive change in my country and pressure my government into taking action," she told the BBC.

Climate change was also "escalating existing gender inequality" - women and girls would endure a "steep social cost", Namugerwa said.

According to a 2015 report by the World Health Organization (WHO), women are more vulnerable than men to the impact of extreme climate events for a variety of reasons, including biological and social factors.

But women and girls would not suffer in silence, Namugerwa said. "We have no-one to fight for us so we have to do it ourselves."

The US, China and India are the three biggest emitters of carbon dioxide in recent decades, according to latest statistics from Our World in Data.

Asheer Kandhari is a 15-year-old climate activist from India's capital, Delhi, where studies show carbon emissions are having a significant impact on air quality. Kandhari was inspired by the recent Extinction Rebellion protests in London, which saw activists glue themselves together, blocking major roads and train routes.

Of the world's 30 worst cities for air pollution, 22 are in India, according to a report by Greenpeace and AirVisual. Delhi, where Kandhari strikes with FFF India, was ranked the world's most polluted capital. In contrast, London is the 48th most polluted capital.

Furious with an Indian government she claims is "destroying" the environment, Kandhari wants Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to declare a climate emergency. "They're not realising how important this is or the severity of the situation," she said.

She called on boys to get more involved. "It's as much their movement as it is ours," she said.

Research by Girlguiding has found that climate degradation ranks among the biggest concerns for young women.

With the help of the world's media, Thunberg has amplified and personified their anxieties. In the process, she has managed to mobilise them with a simple call to action: school strike for climate.

For Kandhari, the reason for joining her is a matter of life and death. "What's the point of studying if [humanity may not live to see] next century?" she asks.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-48114220
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 04, 2019 10:51 am

Trash Girl moves schools over bullying

A 13-year-old nicknamed "Trash Girl" by bullies for picking litter has changed schools after pupils assaulted her

Nadia Sparkes won international praise and awards for gathering litter on her journey to and from school, and refused to let the taunts deter her.

Police got involved last term when she was shown a knife and punched at school, her mother said.

Her old school, Hellesdon High School near Norwich, said pupils' safety and welfare was of paramount importance.

Since 2017, Nadia has set off for school an hour early each day to pick up litter and put it in her bicycle basket.

She turned the "Trash Girl" slur on its head and embraced the nickname because it made her feel "like a superhero" - attracting more than 4,000 followers on social media.

But Paula Sparkes said her daughter was not championed at her school.

"The staff were not on her side to help and support her and we felt it was not appropriate for her to be there any more," she said.

She said police became involved last term when Nadia was allegedly shown a knife and shortly afterwards chased and punched by a pupil.

Norfolk Police confirmed it was called to an incident at the school and had referred a teenager to the Youth Offending Team, which was providing support.

"Officers also provided extra knife crime prevention presentations to all years groups," a spokeswoman added.

In a separate incident, Nadia had to sit through a class covered in orange juice that had been thrown in her face, her mother said.

"Nadia picked up a [volunteering] award from the prime minister earlier this month - it's a shame when you think what the school could have achieved with this, and they haven't."

She met one of her new teachers, Reepham High School's Matt Willer, when the pair were both nominated for an eco hero award.

Mr Willer, who runs an allotment project, said: "I'd heard of the amazing work she was doing collecting rubbish and how, very sadly, she was being bullied because she was doing something different.

"This hit a nerve with me and we discussed how Nadia might like to come and have a look at Reepham High."

Nadia had a "brilliant" start at Reepham after the Easter break and proudly wore her uniform made from recycled plastic bottles.

"She is literally wearing litter, it's like it's meant to be," said Mrs Sparkes.

Nadia's new school is about 11 miles from her home but she hopes to continue litter-picking en route to the bus stop.

Mr Willer said the teenager would be a "huge asset" to the allotment project.

"All the volunteers look forward to working with her as we all set a sound example about respecting the environment and living more sustainably."

Hellesdon principal Tom Rolfe said the school did not tolerate bullying and would not actively discourage a pupil from pursuing their passion.

"We promote an ethos that reflects high moral standards, a culture of social responsibility and fosters a safe learning environment for all students," he added.

"All students are respected and their individuality is valued."

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-48065405
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 04, 2019 8:59 pm

Humans risk wiping out ONE MILLION natural species

Humans risk wiping out ONE MILLION natural species as the Earth's life-support system reaches breaking point, say UN scientists urging action

    They say that food and water resources will run dry for future generations

    Earth's vital life-support systems at breaking point, according to UN scientists

    It is the first dossier of its kind since 2005 and is due to be released in Paris
Mankind is on the verge of wiping out up to one million natural species which will put the Earth's vital life-support systems at breaking point, UN scientists will reportedly warn.

They say that food and water resources will run dry for future generations and put humanity in jeopardy unless immediate steps are taken to reverse climate destruction.

Stark warnings about the ecological crisis are to be made in a 1,800-page UN report which reveals that the annihilation of natural landscapes, forests and wetlands is leading to an 'unsustainable' loss of plants of animals which risk extinction

It is the first dossier of its kind since 2005 and is due to be released in Paris on Monday, but a preliminary copy has been leaked to the Guardian.

Robert Watson, chairman of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), told the paper: 'There is no question we are losing biodiversity at a truly unsustainable rate that will affect human wellbeing both for current and future generations.

'We are in trouble if we don't act, but there are a range of actions that can be taken to protect nature and meet human goals for health and development.'

'The suffering will be awful': 83-year-old joins climate protestors

Food, pollination, clean water and a stable climate all depend on a thriving plant and animal population

The experts say that food and water resources will run dry for future generations and put humanity

Hundreds students took part in the School Strike for Climate yesterday as the global assessment on the state of nature - the product of 400 experts over three years - was leaked

The global assessment on the state of nature - the product of 400 experts over three years - will construct several scenarios for the future based on likely decisions taken by governments and policymakers over the coming years.

Food, pollination, clean water and a stable climate all depend on a thriving plant and animal population.

The report comes after scores of eco-activists rallied in London to raise awareness of climate change and its global impact.

Extinction Rebellion protesters paralysed parts of the capital for ten days as they blocked roads and caused transport chaos.

And earlier this week Members of Parliament approved a Labour motion calling on the government to declare a 'climate emergency'.

Welcome to the Anthropocene outlines state of the planet

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... point.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 04, 2019 10:27 pm

Climate Spring: UK protests
embolden global climate movement


A civil disobedience campaign that prompted the British parliament to declare a climate emergency has galvanized environmental activists around the globe by showing how rapidly disruptive tactics can force politicians to listen

Climate change activists lock themselves at the gate of the Houses of Parliament during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain May 3, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

In what some activists have dubbed a ‘climate spring’, grass-roots networks spurred by the grim findings of the latest climate science are building a momentum that is taking governments, corporate executives, and even members of the groups themselves by surprise.

“This is saying: be bold, act, don’t wait and think you need to mobilize a million people — 5,000 is enough,” said Farhana Yamin, a leading figure in Extinction Rebellion, a new movement that sparked a national debate on climate change after occupying four sites in central London last month.

Yamin was speaking to Reuters outside parliament late on Wednesday, where lawmakers had just acknowledged the urgency of the climate crisis with a symbolic declaration, made in response to the protests.

While nobody can say whether the activists will catalyze the kind of transformational changes in energy, transport and farming that scientists say are needed to avert the worst loss of life from climate change, campaigners believe the moment is ripe to redefine the politically possible.

Last year’s northern hemisphere heatwaves and wildfires, and a stark warning from a UN-sponsored panel of climate scientists issued in October, have spurred thousands of first-time activists to join protests and risk arrest to try to persuade governments to curb the use of fossil fuels.

In the United States, the youth-led Sunrise Movement is backing a proposed Green New Deal tabled by U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, which has rallied a diverse coalition of supporters by twinning plans to tackle climate change with social justice.

Most of the Democratic presidential candidates, including Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren, have embraced the Green New Deal.

On March 15, an estimated 1.5 million school children and students heeded calls by 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg to walk out of their classrooms. The growing school strike movement is particularly active in Germany, where protesters have also waged a civil disobedience campaign to blockade coal mines.

Meanwhile, indigenous communities in North America, Australia and South America have entrenched their resistance to new oil pipelines and mines, and Extinction Rebellion, launched in Britain in late October, has inspired more than a dozen international offshoots.

“All these things have made this feel like a ‘climate spring’ and have certainly driven more people to want to get involved,” said Nic Eliades, an activist who volunteers with Extinction Rebellion in Spain, where the group blocked traffic outside the Madrid headquarters of energy company Repsol on April 15 to coincide with the start of 11 days of protests in London.

“The UK’s success has certainly inspired us and given us an impetus to move forward,” Eliades said.

A SHIFT IN THE ZEITGEIST

From a semi-naked protest in Britain’s parliament to members gluing themselves to a pink boat at Oxford Circus, Extinction Rebellion has provided a model of how a well-organized civil disobedience campaign can hijack the attention of the media and political establishment — even if public opinion is divided over the disruption caused.

Only one in five people surveyed by polling company ComRes supported the group’s aims and tactics despite more than half believing that climate change could end the human race.

Extinction Rebellion wants to force governments to rapidly cut carbon emissions and repair damage to the natural world. Members have cautioned that Wednesday’s opposition-sponsored declaration in the UK parliament, adopted without a vote, should be seen only as a first step.

Bill McKibben, a leading US environmentalist and co-founder of 350.org, a global climate campaign, said the worldwide upsurge in citizen engagement aimed to embolden politicians to take the kind of rapid action that might yet avert a breakdown in the climate system.

“What all these activists are working toward is less particular pieces of legislation, and more a shift in the Zeitgest — a shift in our sense of what’s normal, and natural and obvious,” McKibben told a conference on climate change hosted by the Findhorn Foundation in Scotland last month.

Buoyed by the spectacle of Extinction Rebellion bringing parts of London to a standstill, climate campaigners in the United States are finalizing plans for a general strike this autumn — effectively encouraging adults to follow the example of children in the school strike movement.

https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-envir ... KKCN1S91FI
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun May 05, 2019 10:54 am

Couple create new rainforest planting
2,000,000 trees over 20 years


A married couple have helped breathe new life into the world’s lungs by restoring a barren plot of land into a healthy rainforest

Click photo to enlarge:
1169

Photojournalist Sebastião Ribeiro Salgado and his wife Lélia decided to replant the forest seeing how the area around his family’s cattle ranch had diminished.

Now 20 years later, the 1,754-acre plot of land is the lush and verdant forest Salgado remembered as a child.

Salgado returned to his native Brazil to take over his family’s ranch in the Minas Gerais region nearly 30 years ago after documenting the harrowing genocide in Rwanda.

The abundant forest he remembered as a boy had shrivelled down so much only 0.5 per cent of the land was covered with trees.

He told the Guardian: ‘The land was as sick as I was – everything was destroyed.’

Restoring the land to its former glory would be a mammoth task, so in 1998 the Salgados set up the Instituto Terra – an organisation ‘dedicated to the sustainable development of the Valley of the River Doce.’

Now the area has status as a Private Natural Heritage Reserve and is home to 172 types of birds, 33 varieties of mammals and 15 kinds of reptiles and amphibians.

Hundreds of species of trees and plants now grow there, dried up springs have started flowing again and the micro-climate has changed.

Reflecting on the success of the project, Salgado said: ‘All the insects and birds and fish returned, and, thanks to this increase of the trees, I too, was reborn – this was the most important moment.’

Couple plant 2 million trees over two decades

Salgado thinks a ‘spiritual return to our planet’ is needed to save it from destruction and says replanting forests with trees, which turn CO2 to oxygen, is one answer to climate change.

He added: ‘We need to replant the forest. You need forest with native trees, and you need to gather the seeds in the same region you plant them or the serpents and the termites won’t come.

‘And if you plant forests that don’t belong, the animals don’t come there and the forest is silent.’

Link to Article - Photos:

https://metro.co.uk/2019/05/04/couple-c ... s-9412376/
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat May 11, 2019 9:56 pm

Landmark UN plastic waste pact
gets approved but not by US


Landmark UN plastic waste pact to reduce pollution gets approved by nearly every country in the world EXCEPT the US

    A legally binding framework to reduce the pollution from plastic waste emerged Friday at the end of a UN-backed convention

    The 'historic' agreement leaves countries to track thousands of types of plastic waste outside their borders

    It's linked to the 186-country, UN-supported Basel Convention

    The United States is one of the few countries that is not supporting the pact
Nearly every country in the world has agreed upon a legally binding framework to reduce the pollution from plastic waste except for the United States, U.N. environmental officials say.

An agreement on tracking thousands of types of plastic waste emerged Friday at the end of a two-week meeting of U.N.-backed conventions on plastic waste and toxic, hazardous chemicals in Geneva, Switzerland.

Discarded plastic clutters pristine land, floats in huge masses in oceans and rivers and entangles wildlife, sometimes with deadly results.

The discarded plastic has been seen floating in huge masses in oceans and rivers, sometimes with deadly results. Herons are seen feeding on a dump site in Indonesia's Lhokseumawe

Rolph Payet of the United Nations Environment Program said the 'historic' agreement linked to the 186-country, U.N.-supported Basel Convention means that countries will have to monitor and track the movements of plastic waste outside their borders.

The deal affects products used in a broad array of industries, such as health care, technology, aerospace, fashion, food and beverages.

'It's sending a very strong political signal to the rest of the world - to the private sector, to the consumer market - that we need to do something,' Payet said. 'Countries have decided to do something which will translate into real action on the ground.'

Countries will have to figure out their own ways of adhering to the accord, Payet said. Even the few countries that did not sign it, like the United States, could be affected by the accord when they ship plastic waste to countries that are on board with the deal.

Payet credited Norway for leading the initiative, which first was presented in September. The time from that proposal to the approval of a deal set a blistering pace by traditional U.N. standards for such an accord.

The framework 'is historic in the sense that it is legally binding,' Payet said. 'They (the countries) have managed to use an existing international instrument to put in place those measures.'

The agreement is likely to lead to customs agents being on the lookout for electronic waste or other types of potentially hazardous waste more than before.

'There is going to be a transparent and traceable system for the export and import of plastic waste,' Payet said.

The US wasn't part of the decision-making process behind the pact and is one of two countries that hasn't ratified the agreement, CNN reported.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... ot-US.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon May 13, 2019 1:25 am

March in central London demand
action on climate change


The mother of Ella Kissi-Debrah, who died of an asthma attack believed to be linked to air pollution, told a climate rally her daughter died a “very horrible death”

Hundreds of mothers, fathers and families with babies and children took to the streets of central London to demand urgent action on climate change on Sunday.

Rosamund Kissi-Debrah, whose daughter died in 2013, told the crowds she was “too heartbroken to be angry”.

"If you deal with air pollution it means you will also deal with climate change.

"Everyone here needs to be bothered about the impact of air pollution.

"My daughter died a very, very horrible death.

"If you live near a main road you should be angry. I'm too heartbroken to be angry."

Crowds of protesters carrying banners, flags and placards marched from Hyde Park Corner to Parliament Square as part of the Mothers Rise Up march.

The rally was led by 11 11-year-olds to represent the 11-year window to act on the climate emergency and accompanied by three giant prams with large globes sitting inside them, two painted like the earth and another painted brown as if scorched.

Elliott Powell was one of the youngsters leading the march and told the crowds sitting in Parliament Square he did not believe he had a future right now.
[mothersriseup1205]

Protesters hold up placards as they gather for a march calling for action to combat climate change organised by the climate campaign group Mothers Rise Up. (AFP/Getty Images)

He added: "We need action now and it's really distressing because the Government isn't helping.

"We need to act now before it's too late."

TV presenter Konnie Huq, comedian Shappi Khorsandi and lawyer and activist Farhana Yamin also addressed the crowds at the rally.

Ms Huq told the crowds that the march had been organised by mothers in between changing nappies and dropping children off.

She added: "The reason we are here is because of the youth strikes - the young people have been putting us to shame and it's time for us adults to take responsibility."

Mothers Rise Up co-founder Catherine Webb told the crowds that after seeing the youth strikes she felt like parents were failing their children.

The mother-of-two warned that people were "sleepwalking towards a cliff with our babies in our arms".

She added: "We want what every mother, what every parent, wants: we want what's best for our kids."

Similar marches were due to take place across the country and internationally, including Cyprus, the Netherlands, Spain, the Czech Republic and Australia.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/ ... 40316.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon May 13, 2019 9:24 pm

Kevin Pietersen sent 'horrendous'
photos of slaughtered rhinos


Former England cricketer Kevin Pietersen takes aim at rhino poachers as he raises £162,000 towards a state-of-the-art thermal surveillance technology to help save the animals from extinction in his native South Africa

    Kevin Pietersen said there is no reason why rhinos should be being poached

    38-year-old doesn't want his grandchildren to miss out on seeing the animals

    He has raised money for specialist technology to help prevent poaching

    Former cricketer said they are a symbol of wealth for many across the world
Former English cricketer Kevin Pietersen has taken aim at rhino poachers, raising money for new technology which could help save the animals.

Speaking on ITV's This Morning, the 38-year-old said he is taking part in conservation work, so the next generation don't miss out on being able to see the animals.

He has now raised a staggering £162,000 to save the animals from extinction in his native South Africa.

The money has helped to develop specialist thermal nighttime surveillance named FLIR, a forward looking infrared system.

Kevin Pietersen wants his kids to see poaching impact on rhinos

Speaking to Holly and Phil (pictured above on the sofa) he revealed that he is sent horrendous images of animals being harmed every day

Pietersen said he had been raising money in order to develop the technology which would help safeguard the animals and catch the poachers.

'The poachers own the night at the moment, we are launching the technology on Wednesday and its groundbreaking. We are at a point where we can prevent this but it costs a lot of money'.

'There's no thermal imaging… So we are launching that technology on Wednesday in Kruger Park and its groundbreaking. It's just amazing.'

On a clip shown from his new podcast, Kevin Pietersen: Beast of a Man, he says he is 'sick and tired of seeing dead rhinos'.

Pietersen pictured above with his children in 2018. He said he wants their children to be able to see all the animals we see today

'It pains me it hurts me – I want my children's children to see the things we see now and I want to save them.

'There is absolutely no reason why this should be happening. It's a crime scene. It's so so real, I hope we can show you how real it is.'

Pietersen made the series for BBC Sounds, with the help of BBC journalist Sarah Brett.

She stated he had 'returned to his natural habitat', she also added that 'big beasts can be difficult to control: that in a nutshell is the story of Kevin's playing for the England cricket team.'

Growing up in South Africa, Pietersen said he had really lived the outdoor lifestyle and that it had been 100 per cent 'animal animal animal'.

Kevin Pietersen said that people see the horns as a symbol of wealth and that they have started to stock pile them

Pietersen had previously visited Custom House in Heathrow with then foreign secretary Boris Johnson, in order to look at seized Rhino horns

'For the first 20 years of my life I was completely outdoors and then we moved here and jumped into the bubble here in England and we lived beautifully happy here.

'I've been here almost 20 years. We bring our kids up here and we have a lodge in Africa and we sort of commute between the two countries, which is pretty special.

It was in 2013 that Pietersen went on a rhino tagging expedition which he said really changed his view on things.

'So when I played for England, you're English English English, did that shift in 2000 and then I sort of lost my connection to South Africa. And when everything fell to pieces I think I was with you guys and we did a whole thing when my book came out.

'There was such a horrible period of my life and it was just shocking and in and around that time I had been to South Africa on the Rhino chipping experience.'

He explained that on the black market the horns are worth more than cocaine and said that various places have started stockpiling them, as they prepare for the animal to become extinct by 2025.

'There is zero medical value in them, they can't cure cancer, they are not an aphrodisiac. It's a symbol of wealth for many, the more you stock pile the wealthier you will be.'

Speaking on the topic of trophy hunting, Pietersen said he doesn't agree with it, but agrees with hunting if it is for food.

'Waking up in the morning with that desire to kill one of the big five and I don't understand it.

'On my new podcast I actually spoke to Michael Gove about the imports of trophies. He told me that he isn't going to stop the imports into the UK yet because it assists in conservation.

'But if it assisted in conservation why would it be diminishing the population?'

Pietersen is also set to star in a new two part documentary on National Geographic on Monday 17th June, which will chart the harrowing story of orphaned rhinos.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... s-day.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue May 14, 2019 10:29 am

Spaceship Earth – Bluedot Festival

At bluedot, we’re working closely with our friends at Jodrell Bank exploring how sustainability plays a central role in all our work across the festival and beyond. From being one of the first festivals in the UK to use all LED festoon lighting in our inaugral year, to using a vast 15 acre wildlife refuge as our home at Jodrell Bank, both us and the team at the Observatory work hard to reduce waste and minimise our carbon footprint at the festival

While we work hard to put sustainability at the heart of festival production, a key part of our overarching public mission is ‘to highlight the fragility of planet Earth’.

Offset your carbon footprint –

Offering festival goers the choice to make a ‘Carbon Offset’ donation when they buy their tickets. We give our staff, contractors and artists the opportunity to do the same with Energy Revolution. We invest 100% of this in renewable energy with Energy Revolution, a festival industry collaborative charity.

Initiate car sharing schemes and providing coaches for festival-goers to arrive together.

No single use plastics –

We're working alongside the AIF to ban single-use plastics at the festival. Removing the use of plastic straws, plastic containers, plastic cutlery and single serve sachets of salt, pepper, sugar or sauce from food traders.

All onsite water sales will be in the form of Can-O-Water instead of single use plastic water bottles, so no plastic bottles of soft drinks will be available. We encourage our festival goers to bring their own refillable water bottle for use onsite. We will also be giving all our staff and artists who join us reusable water bottles.

Zero waste to landfill –

0% of our waste will be going to landfill. We'll be providing extensive recycling opportunities across the festival site which we'll separate at source, sending less to incinerators. All food waste will be split from other waste across the site, to then be composted. We'll be working with 8th Plate to salvage any food waste from traders and donate to the local community.

United Utilities water bottles –

United Utilities will be installing free refill water points across the festival and providing free water bottles for festival goers – more info on how you can secure one in advance coming soon.

Alternative power supplies –

We will replace generators with diesel generators in some areas and introduce Hybrid generators with fuel monitoring to give us the data to use less in at future festivals.

Abandoned camping equipment campaign –

Working with the AIF for their 'Take Your Tent Home' and 'Say No To Single Use' campaign. We offer tent collections for charity and an onsite local food back collection.

Sustainable merchandise –

Working in collaboration with Beaumont Organic for our bluedot 2019 merchandise.

Recycled wristbands –

All wristbands will be made from bamboo and recycled plastics.

Compost toilets –

We'll be introducing compost toilets across the festival.

Our home Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre is committed to sustainability and works towards the University of Manchester's sustainable goals. Highlights from the Discovery Centre's list of sustainable actions include:

    Using a hybrid vehicle for staff use, for example when travelling to educational outreach and community engagement sessions.

    Using an electric buggy on site.

    Buildings installed with wind catchers, air source heat pumps and LED lighting.

    Offices installed with movement sensor lighting to reduce energy consumption and automatic windows to ensure heat conservation.

    Recycling bins across the site and a green waste recycling scheme for the gardens and grounds

    Maintaining the diverse ecology of the 35 acres of gardens and arboretum at Jodrell Bank.

    Working with local suppliers to promote local organic and sustainable food production in relation to the Jodrell Bank cafe.
In recognition to its commitment to sustainability, Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre recently received a Silver Award from Green Tourism.

ACCOUNT FOR YOUR TRAVEL CARBON WITH THE ENERGY REVOLUTION.

Bluedot is part of an unprecedented festival industry initiative, which aims to account for audience travel. 63% of our festivals carbon footprint is audience travel. You can make a donation when you buy your tickets, 100% of which will be invested in renewable energy.

Last year, your Carbon Offset donations contributed to an incredible project in the UK, including a community owned wind-turbine in the Forest of Dean that supplies clean electricity to the local community. The 500KW wind turbine creates 1,550 MWh per year, powering 350 local homes with clean electricity and saving 731 tonnes of CO2 each year.

The project also offers a fund to support local projects that are working to build community resilience, especially around reducing fuel poverty through energy efficiency and education.

Reduce your carbon footprint and pedal to bluedot with the team at Red Fox Cycling!

Cycle from Manchester Piccadilly Station either Thursday 18 July or Friday 19 July with a gathering of like-minded people and join them on an adventurous cycle to Jodrell Bank. Every rider will enjoy a Meteor Showers pass + VIP upgrade for FREE for the weekend.

Find out more & book here:

https://www.redfoxcycling.co.uk/pages/m ... to-bluedot

Link to Article:

https://www.discoverthebluedot.com/spaceshipearth
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed May 15, 2019 1:07 am

WWF International

It’s simple. Sir David Attenborough explains how humans can take charge of our future and save our planet.

What is Our Planet?

A Netflix original documentary series and groundbreaking collaboration between WWF, Netflix and Silverback Films.

Our Planet showcases the world's natural wonders, iconic species and wildlife spectacles that still remain.

We're all a part of this amazing planet, but we're changing it like never before. Discover the story of the one place we all call home.

phpBB [video]


https://youtu.be/0Puv0Pss33M
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
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Posts: 22173
Images: 533
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

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