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Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

This is where you can talk about every subject (previously it was called shout room)

Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Mar 24, 2024 11:24 am

Istanbul: brutal killing of stray cat

An animal rights group announces that it would be appealing the culprit's early release, citing that he should be jailed for four years not one as stated by law

The streets of Istanbul are being flooded with protests and petitions urging the Turkish President to take more measures to retry the criminal who killed a stray cat.

Back in January, Ibrahim Keloglan was caught on security camera footage in his residential building kicking a stray cat named Eros to death.

Last month, the culprit was sentenced to 18 months in jail but was released on good behavior, sparking an uproar among animal welfare groups and the public.

An online petition was signed by around 320,000 people who demanded a stricter sentence as the justice ministry last month claimed Ibrahim Keloglan would be retried following a night-time call from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan saying he was taking "personal" interest in the matter.

Even though the judges increased his sentence by a year, he was not detained.

One animal rights group announced that it would be appealing, citing that he should be jailed for four years stated by law.

During the trial, it came to light that Keloglan attacked and killed the cat for about five minutes, despite its attempts to escape.

The hashtag #JusticeforEros (#ErosicinAdalet) is trending on social media platform X, while in Turkey several major newspapers, such as Hurriyet, display pictures of the dead cat on their front pages.

Hurriyet posted several articles about Eros and "Ibrahim the killer", while many celebrities joined the Justice for Eros appeal, such as Argentinian footballer Mauro Icardi of the reigning Turkish Galatasaray team.

https://english.almayadeen.net/news/mis ... ling-of-st
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Jun 22, 2024 8:52 pm

Peshmerga Protect Nature in Kurdistan

Besides ensuring the security of the Kurdistan Region, the Peshmerga forces have taken on the responsibility of protecting nature, birds, and animals as part of their national duties.

The Peshmergas of the second battalion of the 14th Brigade of the Region’s Peshmerga Ministry have built several water wells in Mount Qarachogh, a critical move in a region where water scarcity is a significant concern.

The Civil Defense of Kurdistan has issued guidelines emphasizing the importance of providing water for birds and animals to help preserve the Region's diverse nature. These measures ensure the well-being of wildlife in arid areas like Mount Qarachogh. The guidelines include recommendations for safeguarding human health, homes, and vehicles, alongside measures for environmental conservation.

Water is essential for the survival of wild animals in arid regions. By constructing these water wells, the Peshmerga forces ensure that birds and animals have access to this vital resource, supporting their well-being and contributing to the preservation of the diverse nature found in Kurdistan.

This initiative highlights the multifaceted role of the Peshmerga, extending beyond defense to encompass environmental stewardship.

https://www.basnews.com/en/babat/852021
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 27, 2024 10:41 pm

Iraq poisons hundreds of stray dogs

Authorities have killed at least 600 stray dogs in Iraq's southern city of Nasiriyah, following an uptick in dog attacks against children

Dr. Mohammed Aziz al-Mayahi, director of Dhi Qar’s provincial veterinary department told Rudaw on Sunday the decision to poison the dogs came after an emergency meeting at the provincial level following 11 children being attacked by stray dogs.

He added that there are a growing number of dogs in the provincial capital of Nasiriyah. The strays pose a “serious threat” to residents through spreading diseases, according to Mayahi.

“After the emergency meeting held in Dhi Qar province which included the relevant departments, the meeting decided to purchase poison to destroy the dogs. The campaign has been underway for a week and is continuing,” Mayahi added.

So far 600 dogs have been “destroyed,” according to Mayahi.

He said the options consisted of killing the dogs by weapon or poison to clear them from the urban areas or to open a dog shelter; however, he said that opening a shelter was not practical at this stage.

Col. Maytham al-Mishrefawy, the spokesperson for the police department in Dhi Qar, confirmed to Rudaw that their forces are responsible for euthanizing the canines.

“Some 285 dogs were poisoned in one single day,” Mushrafawi said.

The provincial governor has formed a task force comprised of different departments, including veterinary and the police, to carry out a poisoning campaign.

Dhi Qar province also is dealing with an outbreak of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. The disease can be spread through ticks which live on dogs.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/iraq/240620243
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jun 27, 2024 11:08 pm

Residents queue for clean water

Residents of Darbandikhan town in Sulaimani province still queue to obtain clean water despite the presence of a large dam

Farman Abdulrahman, a resident of Darbandikhan, collects empty cans every two days and visits the well to fetch safe drinking water.

“People in Darbandikhan have struggled to get clean drinking water for over 20 years. You have to plan then come and queue here for more than a few hours until you get a few cans of clean drinking water,” Abdulrahman told Rudaw on Tuesday.

In 2013, the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) decided to build a water treatment plant to address the drinking water problem in Darbandikhan town.

The plant was supposed to be completed within a year, but it has yet to be finished.

“The company has resumed operations, but all that remains is to receive their financial entitlements in the next couple of weeks and start ordering and bringing in materials,” said Bakhtiar Tahir, director of water resources of the towns around Sulaimani.

The Darbandikhan dam is the primary water source for the residents. However, the residents claim that sewage contamination from Sulaimani and Sharazur makes this water unsuitable for drinking or bathing.

The Darbandikhan dam, inaugurated in 1961 on the Sirwan River, supplies electricity to several cities and regulates water supplies to vast farmlands in Garmiyan and central Iraq. The dam has a capacity of three billion cubic meters of water.

The dam was last full in 2019, but would later experience years of drought due to lack of rainfall, exacerbated by the dams built on upstream rivers in Iran.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/27062024
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jun 28, 2024 2:36 am

Fire in Nusaybin countryside threatens 14 villages

Fires from electricity poles continue in Northern Kurdistan. A fire broke out in the village of Serêkaniyê (Pınarbaşı) in Nusaybin district of Mardin this morning and spread to two other villages

The fire, which could not be brought under control despite the intervention of fire brigades and villagers, threatens a large area including 14 villages.

Nusaybin Co-Mayor Gülbin Şahin Dağhan made a statement to the press and public regarding the latest situation with the fire.

Dağhan emphasised that although they informed the relevant units, they did not receive any serious feedback and underlined that if the fire spread to the mountainous area where it is impossible to reach by fire brigade and human intervention, a great disaster would occur.

The co-mayor stated the following:

"There is currently a fire in the forest area in the villages of Çalı, Pınarbaşı and Eskimağara in Nusaybin. We received information that the fire started from electric wires. We rushed to the scene and intervened on the spot. We tried to contact the district governor. We called the relevant units and AFAD (disaster unit). But since it was the morning hours, no one answered the phone.

Our fire brigade teams intervened early, but since it is a mountainous region, they could not intervene in the upper parts. They could only intervene in the area close to the road. There are blowing vehicles for fire intervention in rural areas. Some of these were used by the fire brigade and some by the villagers. Efforts are being made to bring the fire under control in this way. However, the fire still continues. At the moment, it is not possible to control the fire with the fire brigade and manpower in terms of physical facilities. We demand that a helicopter be sent urgently."
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jul 04, 2024 10:05 am

Village guards cut down trees

Village guards are cutting down trees in the area of Komate in Beytüşşebap

Village guards cutting trees in the region of Komate in Beytüşşebap (Elkê) in Şirnak(Şirnex) are destroying forest areas under the supervision of soldiers. Thousands of trees cut down in the mountainous area were collected by tractors on the slopes of the military towers on the sides of the road. The trees are loaded onto trucks and trucks on the Beytüşşebap-Uludere (Elkê-Qileban) road and taken to different cities.

It was stated that the soldiers had previously instructed the villagers in the Komate region to "cut down the trees", but the villagers refused, so the village guards cut them down themselves
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Jul 07, 2024 12:50 pm

Huge nationwide blazes

The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) has denied having a hand in Erbil, Duhok and Kirkuk’s recent fires after the Kurdistan Region’s interior ministry official previously had said on Monday that two people affiliated with the party had been arrested for arson

“We are preparing for coordination and holding elections, rather than starting a civil war,” PUK spokesperson Saadi Ahmed Pira told reporters Monday, denying his party’s involvement in the arsons.

The PUK spokesperson further said that the second person possibly could have been a member of his party previously, but he was not when he committed the alleged crime.

Mirany had said two of the three suspects arrested during their joint investigation with the Iraqi interior ministry were affiliated with the PUK, with one being a member of the party-linked Counter-Terrorism Group (CTG) and the other a member of the PUK. He claimed that they had been “trained” by the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) on how to commit the crimes.

Pira charged that Mirany, a member of the rival Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), was targeting the PUK as part of the election campaign.

“The sponsoring and executing party of this topic is the PKK, which is a banned organization,” Miqdad Miri, spokesperson for Iraq’s interior ministry, had said. He did not name the PUK.

“Their purpose in this matter was to hit the commercial interests of one of the countries they are opposing directly,” Miri added, likely referring to Turkey, and to “impact the economy and security situation in the provinces of the [Kurdistan] Region directly, and create a state of discontent among the people in the provinces.”

The fires incurred around $300 million in material damage, according to Miri.

The PKK, an outlawed party in Iraq, has denied it was behind the blazes, calling on Baghdad to reveal the “real perpetrators.”

In April, Erbil Governor Omed Khoshnaw said that authorities had suspected arson after the city’s famous Langa bazaar caught fire twice in less than two months. Also in April, a massive fire swept through central Duhok’s Chale bazaar, burning more than 300 shops.

A month later, shopkeepers in Kirkuk’s Ottoman-era Qaysari bazaar said they were suspicious about the source of the fire because it broke out in different areas of the bazaar at the same time.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/02072024

Do I personally believe the PUK?

NO not since Bafel Jalal Talabani ILLEGALLY threw out his cousin (the legal join leader of PUK) and took complete control of PUK for himself

I believe Bafel Jalal Talabani belongs in prison along with his crooked friends X(
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jul 10, 2024 7:45 pm

Thursday public holiday as temp soar

Iraq’s meteorology and seismology organization announced that temperatures are set to reach 50 degrees Celsius, prompting a public holiday on Thursday in several provinces

“Temperatures will reach above 50 degrees Celsius in central and southern provinces,” Amir Jabri, spokesperson for Iraq’s meteorology department, told Rudaw on Wednesday.

Jabri highlighted the onset of the year's second heatwave, expected to persist for a few days and cautioned against direct exposure to sunlight.

Thursday is a workday in Iraq; however, public offices and most businesses are closed on Friday and Saturday.

According to the organization’s forecasts, eight provinces will experience temperatures of at least 50 degrees Celsius.

During last month’s heatwave, Iraq’s health ministry issued instructions to citizens, advising against going outside and being exposed to direct sunlight, especially from 10 am to 4 pm.

Extreme summer temperatures were recorded across the globe last year, particularly in Iraq, which is the fifth-most vulnerable country to the effects of climate change.

Scorching temperatures are not new in Iraq, particularly in the south where temperatures regularly approach 50 degrees Celsius, coupled with water scarcity, desertification, and reduced rainfall.

However, a lack of access to basic services, such as water and electricity, makes it more difficult for people to cope with the heat.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/iraq/100720241
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jul 11, 2024 11:13 am

Japan to shoot more bears

Facing an alarming rise in bear attacks, Japan wants to make it easier to shoot the animals in residential areas - but hunters say it is too risky

In the year to April, there were a record 219 bear attacks in the country - six of them fatal, according to official data.

Deadly attacks have continued to occur in recent months, as bears increasingly venture into populated areas. Some are now even thought to see humans as prey.

Bear numbers have revived as Japan's human population ages and shrinks, especially outside cities. The consequences have been dangerous, although usually resulting in injury not death.

Under the current law, licensed hunters can fire their guns only after the approval of a police officer.

The government plans to revise the law at its next parliamentary session so the weapons can be used more freely. For instance, hunters will be allowed to shoot if there is a risk of human injury, such as when a bear enters a building.

Solution: shut the doors

But hunters are wary. "It is scary and quite dangerous to encounter a bear. It is never guaranteed that we can kill a bear by shooting," said Satoshi Saito, executive director of the Hokkaido Hunters' Association.

"If we miss the vital point to stop the bear from moving... it will run away and may attack other people," he added. "If it then attacks a person, who will be responsible for that?"

Hokkaido has come to exemplify Japan's growing bear problem.

The country's northernmost major island is sparsely populated - but its bear population has more than doubled since 1990, according to government data. It now has around 12,000 brown bears, which are known to be more aggressive than black bears, of which there are around 10,000 in Japan by experts' estimates.

Local governments have tried different strategies to keep bears away.

Some have turned to odd guardians - robot wolves, complete with red eyes and spooky howls, while elsewhere in the country they are testing an artificial intelligence warning system, external.

The town of Naie in Hokkaido has been trying to hire hunters for 10,300 yen ($64; £50) a day to patrol the streets, lay traps and kill the animals if necessary.

But there are few takers - it's a high-risk job, the pay is not attractive enough and many of the hunters are elderly.

"It is not worth the trouble because confronting a bear will put our lives on the line," a 72-year-old hunter from the area told The Asahi Shimbun newspaper, likening an encounter with a brown bear to "fighting a US military commando".

In May, two police officers in northern Akita prefecture were seriously injured by a bear while trying to retrieve a body from the woods after a suspected fatal bear attack.

"The bears know humans are present and attack people for their food, or recognise people themselves as food," local government official Mami Kondo said.

"There is a high risk that the same bear will cause a series of incidents."

As bear numbers have grown, more of them have moved from the mountains into flatlands closer to human populations. Over time, they have become used to the sights and sounds of humans, and less afraid of them.

There are also fewer humans around as young people move to big cities, leaving whole towns nearly empty. When bears do encounter humans, it can turn violent.

"Bears that enter urban areas tend to panic, increasing the risk of injury or death to people," said Junpei Tanaka from the Picchio Wildlife Research Center in Japan.

Bear sightings and incidents usually happen around April when they awake from hibernation in search of food, and then again in September and October when they eat to store fat for the winter months.

But their movements have become more unpredictable as yields of acorn - the biggest food source for bears - fall because of climate change.

"This amendment to the law is unavoidable, but it is only a stopgap measure in an emergency," Mr Tanaka said.

    Capturing and killing the animals is not the way forward, he adds. Rather, the government needs to protect the bears' habitat so they are not compelled to venture too far
"In the long-term, it is necessary to implement national policy to change the forest environment, to create forests with high biodiversity."

He added that the government also needs to clarify who should take responsibility for bears that wander into residential zones - local officials or hunters.

"Ideally, there should be fully trained shooters like government hunters who respond to emergencies, but at present there are no such jobs in Japan."

Residential areas are a vastly different terrain for hunters, who are used to killing bears in unpopulated regions, Mr Saito said.

"If we don't shoot, people will criticise us and say 'Why didn't you shoot when you have a shotgun?' And if we shoot, I am sure people will be angry and say it might hit someone.

"I think it is unreasonable to ask hunters who are probably just ordinary salarymen to make such a decision."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/c19kvevezlwo

Bears killed 6 people, how many bears have been killed?
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Jul 17, 2024 11:45 am

Polar bear trackers

New tech aims to keep polar bears and people apart

As the climate warms, polar bears are seen on land earlier in the season

At the end of the Canadian Arctic summer, polar bears head inland to wait for the ice to form.

    And while thousands of tourists flock to catch a glimpse of these magnificent predators, researchers are developing novel ways to keep people and bears safely separated
New tracking devices that stick in polar bears’ fur could be the key to protecting both people and bears - by closely monitoring the animals' locations.

Polar bears now spend more of the year on land, as Arctic sea ice melts, so conservationists are increasingly concerned about bears and people coming into contact.

The tracking tags, which have been tested on bears in Canadian Arctic, could help prevent those encounters, by “keeping a remote eye” on the bears.

The fur tags relay a bear’s position and allow scientists to study behaviour

Lead researcher Tyler Ross, a PhD candidate from York University in Toronto, said the fur tags were “particularly promising” for the prevention of these “human-bear interactions”.

In communities in the southern Canadian Arctic, where the scientists tested these tags, polar bears that wander too close to a community are sometimes caught, transported and released in carefully selected sites away from towns and villages.

“These tags could be fitted to those bears to monitor where they are after they've been released,” explained Mr Ross.

“If they're coming back towards the community, conservation staff would have a sense of where they are, and they could head them off. I think that's where they offer considerable promise."

The researcher, who studies polar bear ecology, also says the tags could fill important gaps in knowledge about the bears. And as the Arctic climate warms up rapidly, the need to monitor bears becomes increasingly urgent.

The new tracker tags attach to the bears' fur and, while the animals are sedated to fit the tags, the devices fall off naturally

“There's a dearth of information about male polar bear movements, because they can't be equipped with conventional tracking collars,” said Mr Ross.

The sea ice [that the polar bears use as a platform from which to hunt] is disappearing faster than it has in the past,” explained Mr Ross. “So the winter hunting season is getting shorter. We want to know where they're moving in response.”

Polar bears are difficult to tag. Male bears’ heads are smaller than their necks, so tracking collars can just slip off.

Another option is ear tags - attached by piercing the bear’s ear. They require an animal to be recaptured in order to remove the tag and, in rare cases, can injure the ear.

The three new tags the researchers tested were designed by the company 3M in collaboration with the charity Polar Bears International. They all attach to the bears’ coarse fur.

To fit the tags, scientists had to locate and sedate bears. They then assessed the quality of the data they received from each device and noted when the tags fell off.

The best performing tag remained attached to the bear for an average of 58 days

The best performing device was called a SeaTrkr tag, which is “crimped” into the bears’ fur. It stayed attached for an average of 58 days and - with an in-built GPS system - allowed the scientists to pinpoint the bears’ location to within just a few metres.

“It’s ideal to have something that falls off naturally - that’s not permanently attached to the bear,” explained Mr Ross. “But anything that lasts in the order of a few months would be great [for our research], because then you’re getting these important seasons that the bears are going through throughout the year.”

Climate change is bringing bears and humans into closer proximity, making places where polar bears and people coexist, riskier for both.

One US Geological Survey study in 2022 that that used data from satellite tracking collars on more than 400 polar bears in Alaska, shows the time they spend onshore has grown significantly in recent decades.

“Getting a better sense of polar bears’ movements is really crucial,” Mr Ross commented. “Particularly given the state of their environment at this point.”

This study of the bear tags is published in the journal Animal Biotelemetry.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cljy48yj99wo
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