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Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate change

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:35 pm

11,000 world scientists
warn of climate crisis


The world’s people face “untold suffering due to the climate crisis” unless there are major transformations to global society, according to a stark warning from more than 11,000 scientists

“We declare clearly and unequivocally that planet Earth is facing a climate emergency,” it states. “To secure a sustainable future, we must change how we live. [This] entails major transformations in the ways our global society functions and interacts with natural ecosystems.”

There is no time to lose, the scientists say: “The climate crisis has arrived and is accelerating faster than most scientists expected. It is more severe than anticipated, threatening natural ecosystems and the fate of humanity.”

The statement is published in the journal BioScience on the 40th anniversary of the first world climate conference, which was held in Geneva in 1979. The statement was a collaboration of dozens of scientists and endorsed by further 11,000 from 153 nations. The scientists say the urgent changes needed include ending population growth, leaving fossil fuels in the ground, halting forest destruction and slashing meat eating.

Prof William Ripple, of Oregon State University and the lead author of the statement, said he was driven to initiate it by the increase in extreme weather he was seeing. A key aim of the warning is to set out a full range of “vital sign” indicators of the causes and effects of climate breakdown, rather than only carbon emissions and surface temperature rise.

“A broader set of indicators should be monitored, including human population growth, meat consumption, tree-cover loss, energy consumption, fossil-fuel subsidies and annual economic losses to extreme weather events,” said co-author Thomas Newsome, of the University of Sydney.

Other “profoundly troubling signs from human activities” selected by the scientists include booming air passenger numbers and world GDP growth. “The climate crisis is closely linked to excessive consumption of the wealthy lifestyle,” they said.

As a result of these human activities, there are “especially disturbing” trends of increasing land and ocean temperatures, rising sea levels and extreme weather events, the scientists said: “Despite 40 years of global climate negotiations, with few exceptions, we have have largely failed to address this predicament. Especially worrisome are potential irreversible climate tipping points. These climate chain reactions could cause significant disruptions to ecosystems, society, and economies, potentially making large areas of Earth uninhabitable.”

“We urge widespread use of the vital signs [to] allow policymakers and the public to understand the magnitude of the crisis, realign priorities and track progress,” the scientists said.

“You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to look at the graphs and know things are going wrong,” said Newsome. “But it is not too late.” The scientists identify some encouraging signs, including decreasing global birth rates, increasing solar and wind power and fossil fuel divestment. Rates of forest destruction in the Amazon had also been falling until a recent increase under new president Jair Bolsonaro.

They set out a series of urgently needed actions:

    Use energy far more efficiently and apply strong carbon taxes to cut fossil fuel use

    Stabilise global population – currently growing by 200,000 people a day – using ethical approaches such as longer education for girls

    End the destruction of nature and restore forests and mangroves to absorb CO2

    Eat mostly plants and less meat, and reduce food waste

    Shift economic goals away from GDP growth
“The good news is that such transformative change, with social and economic justice for all, promises far greater human well-being than does business as usual,” the scientists said. The recent surge of concern was encouraging, they added, from the global school strikes to lawsuits against polluters and some nations and businesses starting to respond.

A warning of the dangers of pollution and a looming mass extinction of wildlife on Earth, also led by Ripple, was published in 2017. It was supported by more than 15,000 scientists and read out in parliaments from Canada to Israel. It came 25 years after the original “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity” in 1992, which said: “A great change in our stewardship of the Earth and the life on it is required, if vast human misery is to be avoided.”

Ripple said scientists have a moral obligation to issue warnings of catastrophic threats: “It is more important than ever that we speak out, based on evidence. It is time to go beyond just research and publishing, and to go directly to the citizens and policymakers.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... -suffering
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:42 pm

Scientists Around the World
Declare Climate Emergency


The world’s scientists are increasingly worried about our civilization’s reluctance to tackle climate change, so in a paper released today, thousands of them are raising the alarm

In a report published in the journal BioScience, over 11,000 of the world’s leading climate scientists have added their names to a declaration calling the planet’s current warming trends a “climate emergency.” Titled “World Scientists’ Warning of a Climate Emergency,” the paper takes an urgent tone, detailing a dire situation that will require extreme responses to avert disaster.

“As a scientist, I feel that I must speak out about climate change, since it is such a severe threat to humanity,” says Bill Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University and lead author of the new report. In addition to a warning about the future, Ripple, his co-authors and the 11,258 other people who attached their names to the paper suggest a set of tools to make sense of our changing world.

The paper, which looks at 40 years of climate data, argues that scientists as well as world leaders should start moving away from using a single number to track the progress of climate change: global average surface temperature. When the world’s leaders signed the Paris Agreement in 2015, that’s the number they used.

According to the Paris Agreement, if the global average surface temperature rises more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, we’ll start seeing more extreme weather events and around two feet of sea level rise. If it rises more than 2 degrees, we’ll experience significant melting of the polar ice caps, widespread desertification and severe coastal flooding. If we do nothing at all about climate change, we could see 4 degrees or more of warming, which could trigger a so-called “hothouse Earth” scenario where runaway climate effects bring us past a point of no return, resulting in a world barely habitable for humans with major population losses around the globe.

But, Ripple argues, global average surface temperature is too simple to capture the nuances of climate change. It ignores other pieces of crucial information, and it doesn’t address all the various ways our planet is transforming.

“For the average policy maker or the public, 1.5 degrees centigrade does not sound like a catastrophe,” he says. “It seems like, ‘O.K., that would be a little warmer, but not too bad.’”

But a global average increase of just a degree and a half would have nuanced and cascading effects. To address this variation, the researchers developed a suite of different metrics, including the amount of heat stored in the oceans, the masses of the polar ice caps, the economic losses sustained from extreme weather events, and the areas of land covered by wildfires in the United States.

Charts

According to the graphs Ripple and his colleagues have put together, despite decades of work fighting climate change, human impact is only getting worse. Fossil fuel use is still increasing. CO2 emissions are barely slowing down. The world’s forests are shrinking as quickly as ever. (William J. Ripple et al. / BioScience)

“The effects of climate change are much broader than just surface temperature,” Ripple says. By incorporating these additional metrics in the conversation, researchers hope to highlight the wide array of climate change’s affects and make them clearer to the public.

“By setting our goals with a single set of measures, we were making the climate problem more abstract,” says David Victor, a climate researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a professor of international relations at the University of California, San Diego. “It was hard to see the progress people were making with that indicator.”

In 2015, Victor authored a paper arguing that the climate debate needed more diverse metrics. Four years later, along with a large body of additional research, this new paper outlines a different way of looking at climate change. Surface temperatures are just one indicator out of many, but regardless of what you focus on, the picture looks increasingly grim.

Over the last decade, for example, the cost of hurricanes, fires, floods, droughts and other such disasters has nearly doubled. The world is projected to spend around $200 billion on climate-related disaster relief next year. That cost is only going to go up as the Earth gets warmer.

Charts 2

Climate change has many wide-reaching impacts beyond a rising thermometer. Effects include hotter and more acidic oceans, melting ice caps, rising sea levels and more extreme weather. (William J. Ripple et al. / BioScience)

The research team also developed a second set of metrics to track humanity’s impact on worldwide climate. “We think that to be holistic in the conversation, and for considering transformative change by society, we should track how we're behaving as humans,” Ripple says.

Dozens of measurements are included, including acreage of deforestation, world GDP, rate of population growth, and even how many cows there are around the world. Collectively, they paint a picture of a society either unaware of the damage it’s doing or unwilling to change. Still, the information is going to come in handy as scientists and leaders seek out solutions.

“You want to understand not just the impact, but also what are the levers you can pull in order to reduce that impact,” Victor says.

The research lists six steps to avoid the worst of an oncoming climate disaster. These steps fall into broad categories, such as energy, short-lived pollutants, nature conservation, food, economy and population. They range from well-known solutions like transitioning away from fossil fuels and countering deforestation to more uncomfortable tactics like slowing population growth and eating less meat.

“We're suggesting a major transformative change in the way that society functions that would promise a greater future well-being for humans,” Ripple says. “I have hope that we will do what it takes to sustain life on planet Earth.”

Link to Article - Charts:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science- ... 180973462/
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Nov 06, 2019 7:23 pm

Italy to put sustainability and climate at heart of learning in schools

Country will become first to make study of global heating and human influence on natural resources compulsory in state schools

Italy is to become the first country in the world to make sustainability and climate crisis compulsory subjects for schoolchildren.

State schools will begin incorporating the UN’s 2030 agenda for sustainable development into as many subjects as possible from September, with one hour a week dedicated to themes including global heating and humans’ influence on the planet.

Other subjects, including geography, mathematics and physics, will also be taught from the perspective of sustainability, announced Lorenzo Fioramonti, Italy’s education minister.

“The entire [education] ministry is being changed to make sustainability and climate the centre of the education model,” said Fioramonti, a former economics professor who was criticised earlier this year for encouraging students to miss school to take part in climate protests.

“I want to make the Italian education system the first education system that puts the environment and society at the core of everything we learn in school.”

Fioramonti, a member of the pro-environment Five Star Movement, is the government’s most vocal supporter of green policies and has previously come under fire for proposing taxes on airline tickets, plastic and sugary foods in order to generate funds for education and welfare.

However, the government’s 2020 budget, presented to parliament this week, included a tax on both plastic and sugary drinks.

Fioramonti said that despite initial opposition to his ideas, the government seemed increasingly invested in greener policies.

“I was ridiculed by everyone and treated like a village idiot, and now a few months later the government is using two of those proposals and it seems to me more and more people are convinced it is the way to go.”

Surveys have shown that up to 80% of Italians back taxing sugar and flights, but industry producers oppose the plastic tax, arguing the “measure penalises products, not behaviour, and only represents a way to recover resources, while placing huge costs on consumers, workers and businesses”.

Fioramonti’s proposals have also come under direct fire from Matteo Salvini, Italy’s climate science-denying former deputy prime minister, whose far-right League voted against almost all key climate proposals in the last parliament.

However, Fioramonti said his ministry would stand strong against the opposition. “I want to represent the Italy that stands against all the things that Salvini does,” he said. “We have to build a different narrative and not be afraid of saying something Salvini may not like, because that’s why we exist.”

https://www.theguardian.com/global-deve ... ate-crisis
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Nov 09, 2019 3:21 am

Unless warming is slowed, emperor penguins will be marching towards extinction

Image

Emperor penguins are some of the most striking and charismatic animals on Earth, but a new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that a warming climate may render them extinct by the end of this century. The study, which was part of an international collaboration between scientists, published Nov. 7, 2019, in the journal Global Change Biology

“If global climate keeps warming at the current rate, we expect emperor penguins in Antarctica to experience an 86 percent decline by the year 2100,” says Stephanie Jenouvrier, a seabird ecologist at WHOI and lead author on the paper. “At that point, it is very unlikely for them to bounce back.”

The fate of the penguins is largely tied to the fate of sea ice, which the animals use as a home base for breeding, feeding and molting, she notes. Emperor penguins tend to build their colonies on ice with extremely specific conditions—it must be locked in to the shoreline of the Antarctic continent, but close enough to open seawater to give the birds access to food for themselves and their young. As climate warms, however, that sea ice will gradually disappear, robbing the birds of their habitat, food sources, and ability to raise their chicks.

Jenouvrier and her team conducted the study by combining two existing computer models. The first, a global climate model created by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), offered projections of where and when sea ice would form under different climate scenarios. The second, a model of the penguin population itself, calculated how colonies might react to changes in that ice habitat.

“We’ve been developing that penguin model for 10 years,” says Jenouvrier. “It can give a very detailed account of how sea ice affects the life cycle of emperor penguins, their reproduction, and their mortality. When we feed the results of the NCAR climate model into it, we can start to see how different global temperature targets may affect the emperor penguin population as a whole.”

WHOI biologist Stephanie Jenouvrier holds a young emperor penguin during fieldwork in Antarctica. Photo courtesy of Stephanie Jenouvrier, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

The researchers ran the model on three different scenarios: a future where global temperature increases by only 1.5 degrees Celsius (the goal set out by the Paris climate accord), one where temperatures increase by 2 degrees Celsius, and one where no action is taken to reduce climate change, causing to a temperature increase of 5 to 6 degrees Celsius.

Under the 1.5 degree scenario, the study found that only 5 percent of sea ice would be lost by 2100, causing a 19 percent drop in the number of penguin colonies. If the planet warms by 2 degrees, however, those numbers increase dramatically: the loss of sea ice nearly triples, and more than a third of existing colonies disappear. The ‘business as usual’ scenario is even more dire, Jenouvrier adds, with an almost complete loss of the colonies ensured.

“Under that scenario, the penguins will effectively be marching towards extinction over the next century,” she says.

Link to video:
https://youtu.be/R2sP24xl3oY

Also collaborating on the paper were David Iles, Sara Labrousse, and Rubao Ji of WHOI; Hal Caswell of WHOI, the University of Amsterdam, and the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research; Laura Landrum and Marika Holland of National Center for Atmospheric Research; Jimmy Garnier of the Université Savoie Mont-Blanc; Cristophe Barbraud and Henri Weimerskirch of the Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé; and Michelle LaRue of the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

https://www.whoi.edu/press-room/news-re ... xtinction/
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:10 pm

Bison Killing Site Destroyed

When a coal company contractor working under federal oversight used a backhoe to dig up one of the largest known Native American bison killing grounds and make way for mining, investigators concluded the damage on the Crow Indian Reservation broke federal law and would cost $10 million to repair, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press

Eight years later, Colorado-based Westmoreland Coal has not made the repairs and is still mining in the area, under an agreement with former Crow leaders that some tribal members said has caused more damage to a site considered hallowed ground.

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs issued a civil violation notice in the case last year, according to agency spokeswoman Genevieve Giaccardo. A Westmoreland executive said no penalty was involved. No charges were filed by federal prosecutors who investigated potential criminal violations.

Burton Pretty On Top, a 73-year-old tribal adviser and spiritual leader, and other Crow members said they were frustrated no one had been held accountable for “desecrating” the 2,000-year-old southeastern Montana site. It held countless bison bones and more than 3,300 stone tools and projectile points in an area known as Sarpy Creek.

“It was a shrine or temple to us,” Pretty On Top said. “We wanted to preserve the whole area … No amount of money in the world is enough to replace what has been lost here. The spirituality of our people has been broken.”

The mining company plans to repair the damage but has not reached agreement with the tribe and government on how that should be done, said Westmoreland executive Joe Micheletti.

Crow Chairman Alvin “A.J.” Not Afraid said the tribe, too, bears responsibility, for signing off when Westmoreland first proposed excavating the site a decade ago. The mine generates about $13 million to $15 million annually in revenue for the Crow, which makes up the bulk of the tribe’s budget, Not Afraid said.

“How can we hold them accountable when we approved them to do something?” he asked.

The large number of artifacts found suggest various tribes killed bison there for centuries before the Crow arrived — butchering animals for meat and turning the hides into clothing, according to experts who examined the site. The number of bison bones found makes it the largest kill site of its time ever discovered, said Lawrence Todd, an archaeologist from Colorado State University who participated in the investigation.

“The magnitude of the destruction done there, from the perspective of the archaeology of the northwest Plains, is probably unprecedented,” Todd said.

Since the investigation, Westmoreland has mined around the killing ground while avoiding the massive “bonebed” of more than 2,000 bison.

Tribal officials and archaeologists said the company compounded the original damage by destroying nearby artifacts including teepee rings and the remnants of a sweat lodge. Pretty On Top said some of the bones excavated in 2011 were piled in a heap, with grass growing over it, when he recently visited.

The excavation was part of a cultural resources survey required under federal law before the mine could expand onto the reservation. The use of a backhoe instead of hand shovels saved the company money but largely destroyed the site, documents and interviews show.

A Crow cultural official later convicted in a corruption case oversaw the work. At least two Interior Department officials, took part in the decision to use the backhoe, according to the documents obtained by AP and interviews with investigators.

The agency, which must protect the tribe’s interests under federal law, declined to answer questions about its involvement. Giaccardo said the matter was under litigation but would not provide details. Micheletti and tribal officials said they were unaware of any litigation.

Neither the company nor government would release the violation notice or the company’s repair plan.

“I’m not going to look in the rear-view mirror. We’re trying to go forward,” Micheletti said. “From our point of view, it’s pretty much all said and done and agreed to on what needs to happen there. The ruling basically concluded that there was no penalty…We did nothing wrong.”

Many bones and other artifacts that were excavated were put into off-site storage until a decision is made about what to do with them, he added. There are no plans to pay the tribe compensation.

Former Crow Chairman Darrin Old Coyote said the company originally planned to mine the entire area and warned the tribe that it would lose revenue if it avoided the killing ground. Old Coyote said that after the 2011 excavation work, his administration insisted on a buffer zone to protect the site from further damage.

Archaeological investigators brought in by federal prosecutors said the bison kill site’s potential scientific value was obvious long before the backhoe was used.

A preliminary survey in 2004 and 2005 revealed artifacts at the site and suggested more might lie beneath the ground. It was enough for it to be considered eligible for a historic designation and meant further damage had to be avoided, minimized or mitigated.

“The real culprits in this in my mind are the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Office of Surface mining. They should have said, ‘This site has to be avoided, period,'” said Martin McAllister with Archaeological Damage Investigation and Assessment, an archaeology firm that led the investigation.

In June 2010, after Westmoreland obtained approval from state and federal regulators to mine in the area, representatives of the company, tribe, BIA and Interior’s Office of Surface Mining gathered at the bison killing ground to decide what to do about the site.

To save on the high cost of excavating by hand — the accepted practice among archaeologists when working on high-value finds — they agreed to use “mass excavation with mechanical equipment,” according to records of the meeting.

The Crow tribal official at that meeting was Dale Old Horn, at the time director of the tribe’s Historic Preservation Office. He was later convicted in a corruption scheme in which preservation office staff who were supposed to be monitoring sites — including the bison killing grounds — took money from both the tribe and the companies they oversaw.

By the time the backhoe work was finished, enough soil, bones, artifacts and other material had been removed to fill more than 300 dump trucks, investigators determined.

Although the preliminary survey work was done under a permit, that permit expired in 2010 and was not renewed. That meant the backhoe excavation violated the federal Archaeological Resource Protection Act, investigators concluded.

In their 2013 damage assessment, they called the loss of archaeological information “incalculable” and said repairing it would cost $10.4 million.

“The damage that was present when we did the assessment has been amplified by having it just sit there since then — uncovered, unprotected and unanalyzed,” said Todd, the bison bonebed expert.

https://time.com/5723298/bison-killing- ... al-mining/
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 10, 2019 2:41 am

South Korea’s Capital
Officially Ends Dog Slaughter


This week, the last three dog-meat shops in Seoul, South Korea pledged to no longer slaughter dogs on-premises.

The move comes after a year-long campaign by Seoul’s Mayor Park Won-soon and the Seoul Metropolitan Government to end the practice and is welcomed by animal-rights group Humane Society International (HSI) Korea—which has been working in South Korea since 2015 to end the dog-meat trade. “I am so happy to see Seoul’s last remaining dog meat shops end dog slaughter.

Although these shops can still sell dog meat, it is nonetheless wonderful to see South Korea take one step further away from this dying industry that most Koreans want nothing to do with,” Nara Kim, dog meat campaign manager for HSI Korea, said. “It gives me hope that South Korea’s future is dog meat-free. HSI Korea will continue working with the government, and supporting farmers who no longer want to work in the dog meat trade, so that one day we will be able to celebrate the closure of South Korea’s final dog slaughterhouse.”

With the help of HSI Korea, Gupo dog-meat market—one of South Korea’s largest dog-meat markets locations in Busan—closed its 19 stalls in July and is currently being transformed into a public park.

https://vegnews.com/2019/10/south-korea ... WJroZbtPuc
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 11, 2019 2:14 am

Eco protesters sail a
HOUSE down the Thames


    Floating house seen sailing down River Thames heading towards Tower Bridge

    Extinction Rebellion protesters put it in the water to highlight rising sea levels

    Comes after Met Police London-wide ban on protests in Autumn found unlawful
Extinction Rebellion protesters have sailed a house down the River Thames in a bid to draw attention to rising sea levels

Stunning pictures show the property, complete with aerial, chimney and burglar alarm, floating near the Tower of London as it heads towards Tower Bridge.

It comes after the Met police's London-wide protest ban was ruled unlawful in the high court, meaning the eco-group could receive millions of pounds worth of compensation in false imprisonment claims.

Sea levels have risen on average five to eight inches worldwide since 1900, according to Smithsonian Ocean, and they claim is expected to rise even more quickly towards the end of this century.

Extinction Rebellion protesters have floated a house down the River Thames in a bid to draw attention to rising sea levels

Image

The property, fitted with a TV aerial, burglar alarm and a chimney was seen floating near the Tower of London and Tower Bridge before it reportedly sunk

The shocking images show the house, which appears to contain one room, bobbing down the capital's river before reportedly sinking.

In a post on Twitter, the group wrote: 'This morning, a house was seen floating then sinking into the Thames in an attempt to send an SOS to the government on climate inaction.

'As the ongoing UK flooding disasters have so starkly illustrated, our homes, businesses and families are at very real risk.'

Human rights lawyer Tobias Garnett, who is also an activist for the group, won a case against the Met police in the High Court on Wednesday, which claimed that the decision to launch a London-wide protest ban in the Autumn was unlawful.

The judicial review was brought on behalf of Extinction Rebellion by Baroness Jenny Jones, Caroline Lucas MP, Clive Lewis MP, David Drew MP, Ellie Chowns MEP, Extinction Rebellion and Labour activist Adam Allnut and journalist George Monbiot.

Image

It comes after the High Court ruled that the Met police's decision to create a London-wide ban on protests was unlawful. Pictured: Police arrest an Extinction Rebellion activist near the gates of Downing Street in central London on October 8

The group said the action risked criminalising those who want to call attention to what they have termed a climate and ecological emergency.

Law firm Bindmans, which represented XR, said the Met now faces claims for false imprisonment from 'potentially hundreds' of protesters who were arrested after the ban was imposed.

Torrential downpours amounting to a months worth of rain across the Midlands and Northern England this week led to floods which swept former High Sherriff of Derbyshire, Annie Hall, to her death.

The ferocious flood waters also caused hundreds of families to be evacuated as homes, businesses and railway lines were submerged.

The village of Fishlake in Doncaster, pictured completely submerged yesterday due to floodwaters formed after a month's worth of rain fell this week

Image

The bottom floors of houses were submerged in the village of Fishlake, Doncaster, which has been pictured yesterday

Image

Flood conditions pictured in Matlock and Darleydale at lunchtime yesterday

More than 400 homes in Doncaster and South Yorkshire were evacuated while the Environment Agency was prompted to issue a 'danger to life' warning as rivers continued to swell.

Yesterday as many as 240 flood warnings were issued

Scientists have predicted that sea levels may rise from between less than a metre to as high as five metres by 2100.

The 2017 National Climate Assessment found that a rise of 2.4metres is possible by the same year.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... hames.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:02 am

Humans bad treatment
of defenceless animals


Why In Brief

The Facts:

    The Intercept, in partnership with Sentient Media, have introduced an eight-part video series about factory farms, animal agriculture and animal rights, entitled “Animal Matters.” Episode three has just been released.
Reflect On:

    Why do we eat animals? Why have we been made to believe that the human body requires meat and dairy when all of the evidence points to the opposite? Why do we participate and vote with our dollar to continue subjecting innocent beings to torture?Do So Many Humans Believe Animal Life Has No Value Or Is Of Lesser Worth?[/size][/b]
The Intercept has partnered with Sentient Media to introduce an eight part video series about factory farms, animal rights, and animal agriculture called “Animal Matters.” Two episodes have already been released. The first one covered the aim and overall goals of the series and the second explored how the issue has impacted collective consciousness, as more people are realizing that using animal products as a means of “feeding the planet’s 8 billion people is ethically, morally, economically and environmentally unsustainable.”

Why do we believe animals are here to serve us? To clothe us? To feed us? If you’re thinking that this is how it’s always been, think again.

Rita Laws, Ph.D., published an article explaining how among her own people, the Choctaw Indians of Mississippi and Oklahoma, vegetables were the traditional diet, and homes were constructed of wood, mud, bark, and cane — not skins. “The principal food, eaten daily from earthen pots, was a vegetarian stew containing corn, pumpkin and beans.” She explains how meat in “the form of small game was an infrequent repast” and how their clothing was even derived from plants. Perhaps one of the most interesting revelations shared by her experiences and research is the fact that “more than one tribe has creation legends which describe people as vegetarian, living in a kind of Garden of Eden. A Cherokee legend describes humans, plants, and animals as having lived in the beginning in ‘equality and mutual helpfulness.’ “

You can read about that and watch the lecture (which is the source for the quotes above) given by her

Furthermore, there was a very special relationship between animals, humans, and nature, especially if an animal was ever taken in a time of need.

How much do we really know about our history? Consuming animals the way we do is something, in my opinion, that was created by big food corporations. We became desensitized enough to consume milk, for example, where a cow is literally raped artificially so she can produce milk for her offspring, but then her offspring is carried away and marked for death and ends up receiving none of the milk. Plus, the milk of a cow is not meant for human consumption, it creates acidosis in the body which in turn leeches calcium from our bones. Casein, the protein in the milk of a cow, is also detrimental to human health because it accelerates the growth of cancer. There is evidence suggesting the milk of a cow is responsible for higher osteoporosis rates, and the mere fact that a high percentage of the human population cannot properly digest the milk from a cow is evidence enough. We’ve never had the gene to digest the sugar in cows milk, we had to evolve into developing it, and furthermore, we are the only animal to drink the milk of another animal. We’re also the only animals in the world to continue drinking milk after weaning. Something is extremely wrong here, and this is just on the subject of milk.

It’s quite clear that a plant-based diet is far better for health than a meat-based one, although this still causes massive amounts of cognitive dissonance. The point is, when it comes to our health, eating meat makes absolutely no sense.

Animal agriculture is destroying our planet. It’s the leading cause of deforestation and wreaks havoc on our environment in many other ways. It currently account for approximately 80 percent of deforestation rates.

But what about morality? What about empathy? How can we so easily subject so many sentient, intelligent animals, who are even smarter than our own dogs, to such torture, depression, and horror? This represents the largest genocide on planet Earth. Why do people think that it’s completely natural and OK to eat meat, and why do people think that we’ve been eating meat for thousands of years? Even multiple neanderthal groups and others related to us might have been completely vegan. Here is a write up from the Guardian about one example. Here is an article I published about that a couple of years ago going into more detail there.

The point is, today we don’t have to eat meat. Refraining from eating meat is better for our planet and our health, and it can help restore love, compassion, understanding and equality on our planet.

But again, how can we just sit back and accept this? How can we keep buying animal products for consumption knowing where they’ve come from? Is it because we haven’t seen it for ourselves? Is it because we are not the ones doing the slaughtering? Does this have some sort of effect? The way we treat animals, grow animals, and raise them for slaughter and mass consumption is one of the most heart-breaking systems on our planet. To treat an innocent, empathetic, intelligent and helpless being in this manner does not really represent what being human is all about, does it?

What is going on here? Why do we look at bacon or steak as pieces of food on our plate, but not as something that wants to snuggle in your arms, play with their brothers and sisters, and be with their family? What gives us the right to spark the mass extinction of animals, or the mass production and murder of them? This is not necessary.

These are the questions that were explored in episode 3 of the series. They bring up various points like the fact that because we feel like we’re more intelligent, perhaps that makes people believe we have the right to do whatever we want. That being said, I’d like to emphasize that we are not more intelligent than all animals. Look at our planet and what we do to others, you call that intelligence? Intelligence goes beyond how we define it, real intelligence is the ability to feel empathy, to love, to care, to have compassion and to act in service of others. The intelligence of many animals is much higher than that of human beings, and we have so much to learn from them.

The Takeaway

Could it be possible that corporate desires for money have driven the meat industry as well as meat consumption to these heights? Processed meats were once on the food guide, but we now know that they are carcinogenic. Why do so many people believe meat is necessary, and that eating it is a good thing? Do our beliefs about our food and where it comes from really originate from us or have they been beamed into us using marketing tactics? Why don’t we learn where our food comes from and see the process when we are growing up? Are our minds really this susceptible to programming and brainwashing? Why do we fight to hang onto something that is no longer serving the collective? Have we become so engulfed in our senses, our desires, and our wants that we are willing to forsake what’s really important? What’s actually good for us?
Have we lost touch with our souls?

    “Veganism is a very fine form of nutrition. It’s a little extreme to tell a person who is using flesh foods that you’re going to take everything entirely away from them. When I was in practice in medicine, I would tell the patients that the vegetable based diet was the healthy way to go, and to keep away from the animal products as much as possible. People are very sensitive about what they eat. You can talk to people about exercising relaxation, good mental attitude and they will accept that. But you talk to them about what they are eating and people are very sensitive about that. If an individual is willing to listen, I will try to explain to them on a scientific basis of how I think it’s better for them.” – Dr. Ellsworth Wareham
It’s great to see a huge consciousness shift around this issue because 10 years ago this type of discussion was not even on the global consciousness radar. We have come a long way, and it’s going to be quite interesting to see if in 10 years from now big meat and diary are even still in business.

https://www.collective-evolution.com/20 ... cGJsaThUf4
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:15 am

Badger cull activists
hit out at costs


Defra revealed that more than £300,000 of public money has been spent on the devices

Hundreds of thousands of pounds of UK taxpayers’ money has been spent on equipping badger cull marksmen and women with tracking devices so that their movements could be mapped by co-ordinators and police.

Anti-cull activists have criticised the expense, arguing that the cost of the cull should be met by farmers rather than the public purse.

The tracking devices were intended to keep the shooters safe during this autumn’s cull. But it has emerged that saboteurs were able to use a security flaw in the devices to locate shooters and disrupt their activities.

Figures from the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) revealed that more than £300,000 has been spent on the tracking devices.

Defra accepted that farmers were expected to fund the cost of the cull but said that on the advice of the police in order to keep shooters safe it had bought the devices.

In 2017, it emerged that almost £500,000 of taxpayers’ money went on buying radios to link shooters with police in remote areas where there is little mobile phone coverage.

Then, too, saboteurs turned the tables by investing in equipment that enabled them to trace the signals produced by the radios, pinpointing the position of marksmen and giving activists the chance to disrupt the shooting.

Jay Tiernan, of Stop the Cull, said: “Once again we have found clear evidence that the killing of badgers which the government told us would be paid for by farmers, is in fact paid for by the British taxpayer.

“Tracking devices that are used by the shooters so that their movements can be coordinated by a central ops room are supposed to be paid for by farmers not coming out of an already overburdened public purse.

“As in previous years, the devices chosen by experts have once again shown to have serious security flaws and have made life much easier for activists to find and neutralise any shooting efforts.”

In September, it emerged that ministers had approved 11 new areas for culling, taking the total up to 43 with up to 64,000 animals likely to be killed. MURDERERS

Badger culling has been the mainstay of the government’s attempt to tackle bovine TB since 2011, with a system of licensed shooting introduced in Gloucestershire and Somerset two years later.

Meanwhile, a man who ran a field sports business in Cornwall has been given a suspended jail sentence after the carcasses of 28 badgers were found in freezers on his home and at an industrial unit in July.

Scott Milne, 42, from Bodmin, admitted killing the badgers outside the time of the authorised cull and passing them off as animals legally shot during the permitted period.

Defending Milne at Bodmin magistrates, Michael Green said: “This is an unusual case in many ways. He felt a pressure to meet badger cull targets to keep his licence, which contributed to him making the stupid decision to shoot badgers outside the cull period.”

Sentencing Milne, the chairman of the magistrates’ bench told him: “Although you were licensed to cull badgers these actions were done entirely outside of any licence period.” Milne received an 18-week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months. He must also carry out 150 hours of unpaid work.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... vH0rdj_WlU
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Nov 11, 2019 9:50 pm

Catastrophic Wildfire
Threat Near Sydney


Spring Outbreak of Wildfire Hits Southeast Australia; “Catastrophic” Threat Near Sydney

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More than five million Australians, including the entire Sydney area, were placed under a fire weather danger rating of “catastrophic” for Tuesday—the first time this top-end rating has been used there since it was introduced in 2009. Dozens of bushfires have pockmarked the region inland from the coast between Sydney and Brisbane in recent days. On Friday alone, more than 150 homes were destroyed, with three deaths and five people unaccounted for, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

The sprawling Sydney area extends from the city center near the coast well into the surrounding bushland, where many thousands of people are vulnerable to fast-moving fires. Strong winds and hot temperatures on Tuesday in advance of a cool front will lead to especially volatile conditions. Along with the Sydney area, catastrophic fire danger is expected in the Hunter and Illawarra areas.

    #Fire Danger Ratings map for #NSW for today (Tues). @NSWRFS now has 3 areas listed as #Catastrophic. Important to note that while Greater #Sydney is listed as one, that area extends well beyond the city. In this case Greater Sydney stretches to the #BlueMountains & #CentralCoast pic.twitter.com/3jfCAfrAje
    — Bureau of Meteorology, New South Wales (@BOM_NSW) November 11, 2019
All of New South Wales—an area bigger than Texas, including Sydney—has been placed under a state of emergency through next weekend, according to weather.com. NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the state of emergency would continue for the next seven days. NSW Emergency Services Minister David Elliott said residents were facing what "could be the most dangerous bushfire week this nation has ever seen."

More than 600 schools are expected to be closed on Tuesday.

"We are in uncharted territory," said NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons on Friday, as reported by BBC. "We have never seen this many fires concurrently at emergency warning level….We just cannot overstate the profound impact that the drought is having on fire behavior.”

Coffs Harbour, a coastal city of 71,000 people about 350 miles northeast of Sydney, is in the crosshairs of one of the most threatening fires. The New South Wales RFS projects that this fire could expand to virtually surround the city on Tuesday (see map in tweet below). Residents west of the Pacific Coast Highway, which bisects Coffs Harbour only about one to two miles inland, are being advised to move east of the highway, toward the coast. Those in outlying towns have been urged to “self-relocate” in Coffs Harbour or one of the other urban areas lining the coast.

    Based on the latest forecast, we have mapped where fires on the north coast are likely to spread during tomorrow's dangerous weather. The red shows the predicted spread of fire. Check https://t.co/NXTTCbYtYQ for detailed information, advice and maps. #nswrfs #nswfires pic.twitter.com/gVstnWDrxC
    — NSW RFS (@NSWRFS) November 11, 2019
According to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), the NWS RFD warned that live embers could be pushed by strong winds as far as 18 miles (30 kilometers) from the fire front.

Through October, 2019 has been Australia’s second hottest and second driest year in more than a century of recordkeeping, according to the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). It’s now mid-spring in Australia, typically the peak of fire season in southeast Queensland and northeast New South Wales (NSW). However, the 2019 fire season got off to an unusually early and intense start. Rainfall over much of this region was at record lows for the 20 months starting in January 2018 and the 32 months starting in January 2017, according to BOM.

    Dry & gusty winds ahead of a trough & cold front will bring dangerous #fire weather conditions to fire-affected areas of #NSW & #Qld from tomorrow.
    A change in wind direction can rapidly alter the course of fires & broaden fire fronts. Stay up to date at: https://t.co/d1Gl7t7n8p pic.twitter.com/6HS7FKhMDI
    — Bureau of Meteorology, Australia (@BOM_au) November 11, 2019
In the short term, fire danger may drop by midweek, as cooler and less-windy weather makes its way into New South Wales. However, the longer-range outlook is for unusually hot, dry weather to predominate through the rest of the month. The last few months of parched conditions are linked to the positive mode of the Indian Ocean Dipole. A positive IOD favors drier weather toward Australia and Southeast Asia and moist conditions toward the northwest Indian Ocean—including the Arabian Sea, which is having its most active cyclone season on record, as discussed by Jeff Masters at Scientific American. The IOD may remain positive into early 2020, said the BOM in its latest climate outlook.

Climate change and Australia bushfires

Australia is famed for its enormous swings between wet and dry periods. A strong climate-change signal in precipitation has yet to emerge from this natural variability. However, there’s a clear and undeniable shift toward hotter weather in Australia, and climate-change models agree this trend will continue. As a result, when dry spells arrive, they’re increasingly likely to be accompanied by unusually hot weather. If this rings a bell, it’s because California has been dealing with the same consequence of our warming world. The trend toward “hot droughts” have transformed California wildfire behavior in recent years, as the heat makes the landscape even drier and more fire-prone when precipitation is lacking.

Lengthening fire seasons—another trend plaguing California—is a concern in Australia as well. “Trends towards a lengthened fire season have already been discerned in some areas of the country, with the fire season typically starting earlier in the year in southern Queensland, inland and southern New South Wales, and Victoria,” noted BOM in a special statement on September’s fires. Parts of NSW are seeing the first day of fire season arriving on average about a month earlier than in 1950.

The Climate Change in Australia report projects with high confidence that East Australia is in for “a harsher fire-weather climate in the future.” It notes that changes in rainfall are uncertain and highly localized, with the greatest confidence for a trend toward reduced winter rainfall later this century. What’s driving the outlook for harsher fire weather is mainly temperature: “There is very high confidence in continued substantial increases in projected mean, maximum and minimum temperatures in Eastern Australia, in line with our understanding of the effect of further increases in greenhouse gas concentrations.” It’s this heating that is making the impacts of drought worse and boosting the potential for catastrophic wildfire, in Australia as well as in California.

These are the letters sent by former NSW Fires Chief Greg Mullins and 22 other former emergency chiefs to the Prime Minister in April and September predicting a bushfire crisis and requesting a meeting. #nswfires #auspol pic.twitter.com/djhHjHknAe
— Zoe Daniel (@zdaniel) November 9, 2019

Climate change is an especially polarized topic in Australia, which has some of the world’s leading climate-change scientists and climate advocates as well as some of the fiercest voices of climate-change denial. In the last several days, political leaders in Australia have declined to address the topic of climate change and wildfire with variations on “now is not the time”, as summarized by BBC: “On Sunday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison refused to answer a question about climate change, saying: ‘My only thoughts today are with those who have lost their lives and their families.’ When asked the same question, New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian told reporters: ‘Honestly, not today.’”

Australian Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack took a similar approach but with a snarkier edge, saying that fire victims “don't need the ravings of some pure, enlightened and woke capital city greenies at this time, when they're trying to save their homes, when in fact they're going out in many cases saving other peoples' homes and leaving their own homes at risk." However, even McCormack acknowledged that Australia was getting drier and that “parts are getting very, very warm,” noted the Sydney Morning News.

Referring to McCormack’s comment that “we've had fires in Australia since time began”, Mid Coast Mayor Claire Pontin told ABC: “Fifty years ago, this would never happen...We don't have capital city greenies around here, we have farmers coming to us and saying, ‘look what's happened to my farm, I can't afford to feed the cows anymore because I've been buying feed for the last 18 months.’”

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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:29 pm

Extinction Rebellion
releasing Christmas song


Extinction Rebellion is aiming for a top slot in the Christmas music charts with a new song urging listeners to fight climate change “before we’re all dead”.

The protest group has teamed up with Bolton-based rock band The Jade Assembly for its first single, called “Time For Change”.

It will be released with a video featuring footage from the group’s activism around the world in the past six months, primarily focusing on its work in London.

The dystopian video will include doctored shots of the Houses of Parliament going up in flames, Downing Street flooded, and MPs including former Prime Minister Theresa May wearing gas masks.

Lead vocalist John Foster sings: “A time to look ahead and now a time before we’re all dead, come on, it’s time for a change. I need everyone to be with me and I need everyone in here tonight to be themselves, so come on.”

The band’s manager Mick Watson told The Times: “The Jade Assembly have always been passionate about the climate crisis and they penned this song out of frustration with the speed and the way our politicians dealt with the crisis. The song is a swipe at the politicians and a plea to other people to come on board, as the chorus says.

“Gail [Bradbrook, one of the founders of Extinction Rebellion] straight away agreed that it’s an anthem for them. She thinks it’s amazing, and she immediately got some footage together for the video.”

Time For Change” will be released in December

https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-ente ... 99576.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:38 pm

City University students
ideas to reduce carbon


City, University of London, students work with Islington Council and Cllr Asima Shaikh to help make Islington carbon neutral by 2030

Students from City University have come up with "game-changing" business ideas to help make Islington carbon neutral by 2030 - and some of the City, University of London, students work with Islington Council and Cllr Asima Shaikh to help make Islington carbon neutral by 2030em are now putting them into action.

City, University of London, students work with Islington Council and Cllr Asima Shaikh to help make Islington carbon neutral by 2030 City, University of London, students work with Islington Council and Cllr Asima Shaikh to help make Islington carbon neutral by 2030

All four winning teams at the City Starters Weekend three-day entrepreneurship competition will now receive support from the uni's business incubation space, the Launch Lab, to see if any of them can be developed into businesses after their studies.

The team GreenLO2 came up with the idea for a was a water turbine to go into household pipes and create energy whenever someone runs a tap or flushes the toilet.

Others included E-TukTuk - a bicycle transportation service; Cora - a device which monitors gas vents and relays information to a smartphone app; and We Connect - an app which connects single parent families together in Islington.
You may also want to watch:

London City Airport animation

Animation showing the transformation of London City Airport that is set to be complete by 2022

Volume 0%

Fabian Ronig from GreenLO2 said: "People won't need to change their habits or adapt their lifestyles, as this turbine means that everyone can make a difference."

The council's business chief Cllr Asima Shaikh who was one of the judges said: "It was fantastic to see so many brilliant and inspiring ideas come out of this competition.

"The idea behind GreenLO2 - to enable free, renewable energy generation in every home - is exactly the kind of game-changing thinking we need if we are to tackle climate change head-on and become a net carbon zero borough by 2030.

"The E-Tuk-Tuk, We Connect and Cora projects all offer the seeds of great solutions that would improve lives too."

https://www.islingtongazette.co.uk/news ... -1-6371252
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 12, 2019 5:42 pm

Extinction Rebellion plan
disruption over Christmas


Now Extinction Rebellion plot to paralyse central London in the run-up to Christmas with another two weeks of protests planned for Trafalgar Square and Oxford Circus

    XR activists are plotting Christmas action over WhatsApp and Telegram apps

    Organiser Clare Farrell said they 'can't overlook' festive period as an opportunity

    Other protestors say climate situation is 'too serious' and 'too urgent' not to
Extinction Rebellion is planning to bring more chaos to London with another two weeks of disruption in the run-up to Christmas.

Climate change protestors claim they will target busy shopping and tourist hubs in the capital, including Oxford Circus and Trafalgar Square, over the festive period.

Organisers are plotting another fortnight of disorder over encrypted messaging apps WhatsApp and Telegram.

It comes after the group's 'Autumn Uprising' brought London to a standstill, with Tube protests at Canning Town, a camp out at Smithfield meat market and blockades at City Airport.

Extinction Rebellion claim they will target busy shopping and tourist hubs in the capital, including Oxford Circus and Trafalgar Square (protestors are pictured there on October 16), over the festive period

XR activists are planning to bring more chaos to London with another two weeks of disruption in the run-up to Christmas

XR organiser Clare Farrell said: 'We need to prioritise Christmas as a cultural event.

'It's something we can't overlook this time. You would hope that something beautiful will happen.

'What I do think is that XR, as a movement, we can't think it will become something that only campaigns twice a year.

'The situation is far too serious and far too urgent. The clock is really ticking,' reports the Evening Standard.

Another activist said in a group chat: 'There will be other actions between now and Christmas focused on our climate message.

'If the Government does not listen to us then we will have no choice but to take to the streets again, whether it's Trafalgar Square, Oxford Street or smaller direct actions.'

An XR spokesman said the campaign was set to continue and added: 'We aren't necessarily pausing, we do have plans for further action within the next couple of months.

'We are in a moment now where what we are doing is necessary. We are running out of time and it is important to continue to carry out action.'

Oxford Circus, Europe's busiest shopping hub, is also a target for the Christmas period

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... ondon.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:02 pm

Bear paws from 60
slaughtered animals


Grisly cargo of 240 bear paws which were 'destined for China to be turned into food and traditional medicine' is seized by Russian security agents

    A stash of bear paws was intercepted by the FSB at a border post with China

    The Russian agents later found tiger paws and mammoth tusks in a garage

    It is likely the bear paws were obtained after illegal slaughter of 60 animals
A grisly cargo of 240 bear paws which were allegedly on their way to China has been seized by Russian security services.

Two paws of an endangered Amur tiger and a pair of extinct woolly mammoth tusks were also found in the illegal cache.

The gruesome goods are believed to have been destined for China to be used in traditional medicines and food delicacies.

The bear paws intercepted at the Chinese border are from Himalayan - or black - bears endemic to the far east of Russia and it is likely they were obtained after the illegal slaughter of 60 animals.

Russia's FSB security service seize cargo of 240 bear paws

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Seized: A cargo of bear paws from 60 illegally slaughtered animals is seen after it was intercepted by Russian security agents

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Illegal: Two of the paws which were seized by Russia's FSB security agency at a border post between Russia and China

'Two Russian nationals and two foreigners have been detained,' said a statement from the FSB security agency.

They face up to seven years in jail for smuggling tiger and bear parts as well as ivory out of Russia, said the security service.

A total of 44 bear paws and two Amur - or Siberian - tiger paws were seized from two 'foreigners' at the Kraskino border post which links China and the Primorsky region of Russia.

Later, 198 bear paws and two mammoth tusks were found in a garage at a house linked to the alleged smuggling ring.

Four sacks of unidentified animal body parts were also seized and will now be analysed.

Sergey Aramilev, director general of Amur Tiger Centre, said the tiger paws were from an animal that died earlier than this year.

The tigers are among the most threatened big cats on the planet.

'This is clearly a crime,' he said.

Image
One of the paws in the collection of 240 bear paws, two paws of an endangered Amur tiger and a pair of extinct woolly mammoth tusks which were intercepted at the Chinese border

Image
The bear paws are from Himalayan - or black - bears endemic to the far east of Russia and it is likely they were obtained after the illegal slaughter of 60 animals

Image
A stash of 198 bear paws and two mammoth tusks were found in a garage at a house linked to the alleged smuggling ring

'All the circumstances of the crime and all the chains in the criminal ring will be established during the investigation.

'It is most important to establish where are the remaining parts of the tiger.'

He warned that only a 'small part' of a large trafficking operation of wild animal parts is curtailed by the authorities.

He also praised the FSB for the successful operation in busting one smuggling route.

Delicacies made with bear paws - such as soups and stews - can command prices of up to £750, it has been reported.

Bear as well as tiger paws are also turned into traditional medicines to supposedly strengthen the spleen and stomach.

They can be used to counter rheumatism, it is claimed.

Mammoth tusks are ground into powder and can be used for traditional medicines and cosmetics.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... eized.html
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Re: Updates: polution; hunting; animal slaughter; climate ch

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:29 am

Mass pig slaughter stains
South Korean river red


A river near the inter-Korean border turned red with the blood of pigs slaughtered as Seoul attempts to curb the spread of African swine fever

Image

South Korea has culled around 380,000 pigs since the first case of the haemorrhagic disease – which is not harmful to humans but is highly infectious in swine – was reported in September.

Pig cases are nearly always fatal and there is no antidote or vaccine, with the only known way to prevent the disease from spreading being a mass cull of livestock.

Image

In a handout photo taken on November 10, and released on November 13 by the Yeoncheon Imjin River Civic Network NGO shows a river coloured red with pigs blood in Yeoncheon county near the Demilitarize Zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea. -AFP/Yeoncheon Imjin River Civic Network

A local NGO said that heavy rains last week caused blood from a burial site near the inter-Korean border – where some 47,000 pig carcasses were piled up – to seep into the Imjin River on Sunday, turning some of the stream red.

“It made many people living in the area anxious and worried,” Lee Seok-woo, who heads the NGO Yeoncheon Imjin River Civic Network, told AFP.

“What was also hard to endure was the odour. I heard many farmers couldn’t work because of the unbearable smell. This should not have happened.”

Pigs blood seen in Yeoncheon county near the Demilitarize Zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea. -AFP/Yeoncheon Imjin River Civic Network

Seoul’s environment ministry released a statement Wednesday saying the blood from pig carcasses flowing into the streams had now been “dealt with properly” using suction pumps and other devices, and the situation did not affect tap water in the region.

“We have built banks and other facilities so that the polluted water does not flow into the downstream region,” the ministry said, adding: “As of now there is no blood in the stream.”--AFP

https://www.nst.com.my/world/world/2019 ... HbfQv9XHs4
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