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Food Room

a place for talking about food, specially Kurdish food recipes

Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Dec 26, 2019 7:02 pm

Are carbs your friend or foe?

Carbohydrates. A crucial source of fibre and nutrients that give us all the energy we need? Or an unnecessary bulk food that plays havoc with our blood sugar?

A carbohydrate is a biomolecule made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms.

Carbohydrates are one of three main nutrient groups found in food, along with fat and protein. Most of the things we eat are made up of differing ratios of these three macronutrients.

There are three different types of carb: starch, sugar and fibre. In the UK we eat a lot of potatoes, wheat and corn based carbs, and we get through large quantities of refined carbohydrates – like pasta, white bread, cake and biscuits. (In fact, a recent study shows that our consumption of highly processed foods, and therefore sugars, outstrips 18 other developed nations!)

What are the arguments in favour of carbs?

According to government guidelines set out in the Eatwell Guide “a third of our intake should come from starchy carbohydrates,” states Professor Louis Levy, head of nutrition science at Public Health England.

Carbs give us energy and aid exercise

Carbohydrates are our main source of fuel. The body breaks the starch down into sugars and absorbs them into the bloodstream – creating glucose. Carbs are converted into the energy we all need to keep our bodies and brains on task – from playing basketball to simply breathing. Carbohydrates, fat and protein all provide energy, but during cardiovascular workouts the body burns sugars faster. Carbs are quicker to process and convert into energy. A low carb diet can lead to low energy and increased fatigue during exercise.

Carbs are an important source of fibre

There’s good evidence that fibre can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and bowel cancer. We get a lot of our fibre from starchy carbohydrates so by reducing our consumption of these carbs, we risk losing our fibre intake. As Anthony Warner, aka The Angry Chef, states, “if you’re discouraging people from eating carbohydrates, that makes eating enough fibre quite difficult.”

We can get fibre from fruit and vegetables but, as Megan Rossi from Kings College London points out, “there’s close to a hundred different types of fibre”, all of which play a different role in our health. One study shows that people eating cereal-based fibres had a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. By cutting out whole grains, she says, we deny ourselves a “a very unique type of fibre.”

Carbs can cure constipation!

Roughage is the fibrous material in vegetable based foods that the body can’t digest, and it’s crucial for getting food and waste moving through our intestines. We get most of our roughage from starchy carbs.

Carbs are a source of nutrients

Healthy sources of carbohydrate (vegetables, fruits, and legumes) are also an important source of vitamins and minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron and B vitamins. Cut out carbs and you’re also cutting back on these essential nutrients.

If you reduce your carb intake it could mean a higher fat diet

Carbs like pasta and potatoes add bulk to our meals and help us to feel full and satisfied after eating. Reducing the amount of carbohydrates you eat and replacing them with more fatty proteins like a lot of red meat and cheese could increase your intake of saturated fat, which can raise the amount of cholesterol in your blood.

What are the arguments against carbs?

Some people, including medical professionals and patients, are choosing to significantly reduce the amount of carbohydrates they’re eating – thereby rejecting the guidelines on nutritional health issued by Public Health England. In some cases, cutting carbs is about managing obesity or diabetes. But some of us are going low-carb simply because we think it makes us feel better.

Carbs cause blood sugar peaks and troughs

Eating refined carbs causes our blood-sugar levels to fluctuate dramatically: carbohydrates that are broken down quickly cause a spike in blood sugar, followed by a “crash”. Most of us will have experienced this post-pasta, mid-afternoon slump in energy and mood. A low carb diet means more stable blood sugars.

These peaks in our blood sugar levels can have more serious implications than just feeling sleepy between meals. A spike in glucose triggers your body to respond with a surge of insulin. Dr Aseem Malhotra, one of the most influential cardiologists in the country, explains how eating refined carbohydrates is “clearly linked, very strongly” to “obesity and type two diabetes.”

One audience member from the Food Programme's Big Carb Debate, Margery, supports this view. She tackled her diabetes diagnosis by cutting carbs: “I’ve been able to reverse my condition with the aid of a low-carb diet… I’m now off all diabetic medication.”

Refined carbohydrates include sugars and refined grains that have been stripped of all fibre, bran and nutrients.

Proteins and fats keep you fuller for longer

Carbohydrates cause your body to retain water. The more pasta and rice you eat, the more bloated you can feel. Carbs might fill you up in the short-term, but that full feeling will soon wear off. In contrast, low GI foods like proteins and fats help blood sugar levels rise and fall slowly, which can help you to feel fuller for longer.

Not all carbs contain fibre

We’ve heard how carbs are a good source of fibre. But it’s worth noting that a lot of the carbohydrates we eat contain very little fibre: when they’re refined the bran and fibre is taken out. We can find more fibre in fruit, vegetables, pulses and legumes than pasta or pastries.

Are carbs friend or foe?

With convincing points for and against the consumption of carbs, what’s the answer?

In truth, it’s about finding a balance. Fiona Godlee of the British Medical Journal says the National Institute of Health study published in early 2018 showed that “low-carb and very high-carb were both detrimental to your mortality.” And crucially, despite the guidelines, it’s clear that a one-size-fits-all approach simply doesn’t work. It “just isn’t appropriate,” says Fiona. “Some people do better on some diets and some people do better on others.” So it’s knowing what works for you.

Most importantly, it’s about eating the right type of carbs. We should opt for a wide range of high fibre carbs like whole wheat, oats, quinoa and kale, and avoid simple carbohydrates like cakes, baguettes and biscuits – which are often high in fat and added sugar. It’s time to swap the sweets for the sweet potatoes!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articl ... end-or-foe
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Re: Food Room

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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:24 pm

Is one of these dishes
the next big vegan hit?


Veganuary products from Caffe Nero, Wagamama, Subway, KFC, Pizza Hut and Leon

Image

Hundreds of restaurants have launched tasty plant-based treats in conjunction with Veganuary, a campaign encouraging people to follow a vegan diet for the first month of the year. From pea protein pepperoni to watermelon steak, will any new products rival Greggs's vegan sausage roll success from last year?

Late at night on New Year's Day, dozens of people queued up outside the Greggs on Grainger Street in Newcastle to be among the first foodies to taste the new vegan steak bake before it was first available to buy on 2 January.

Food blogger Emma Phillips had been invited to the event by Greggs as a peace offering after she ate a non-vegan doughnut that had been mistakenly labelled as vegan.

The 40-year-old from Gateshead said the launch became "quite an experience" after various partygoers joined the queue to see what all the fuss was about.

"Bearing in mind it was New Year's Day, the Greggs in particular that they chose was on the corner beside quite a notorious area of Newcastle for revellers, shall we say - so a lot of quite inebriated people were walking past," Emma said.

Image
A launch event in Newcastle for Greggs's vegan steak bake enticed foodies... as well as gatecrashers

After a bit of "ribbing" from non-vegan passersby, "they started to join the queue as well".

Inside, people were rewarded for their wait with trays of steak bakes, a DJ, and some iPads were even given away, Emma said.

Image
Greggs's event poked fun at the way high-end fashion brands might launch new products

It might seem like a lot of hype for just one product.

But Greggs knows how much one star snack can bolster an entire brand.

After Piers Morgan criticised the vegan sausage roll when it launched during the 2019 edition of Veganuary, Greggs's marketing team jumped for joy.

The ITV presenter's characteristically scathing retweet, followed by Greggs's witty reply, helped a video clip advertising the roll to accumulate a cool 5.3m views - and led to widespread media coverage.

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Another year, another foodie photo shoot: Greggs is hoping its vegan steak bake will be as successful as its vegan sausage roll

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpspr ... 0b12b7.jpg
Pizza Hut's vegan "pepperoni" pizza Image copyright Pizza Hut Restaurants

The roll became one of the fastest selling Greggs products for years and helped to contribute to what was described as a "phenomenal year" by the company's chief executive.

Annual sales broke £1bn for the first time, with sales growing 13.5% compared to 7.2% in 2018 - and it was announced on Wednesday that all 25,000 staff members would get a share of a £7m payout to celebrate the success.

So, it's safe to say that food chains have realised there is money to be made out of Veganuary.
Watermelon steak Image copyright Wagamama

Image

Food outlets jumping on the bandwagon include Wagamama, which has launched a "tuna" steak made of watermelon, Subway with its Meatless Meatball Marinara and Costa Coffee with its ham and cheese toastie - free from ham and, er, cheese.

Caffe Nero has launched an entire new menu to help people get through the 31-day challenge - complete with raspberry croissants and "meatball" paninis.

Pizza Hut, meanwhile, says it hopes its Veganuary special, a pepperoni-style pizza made from pea protein, will "appease" - oh dear - " even the greatest meat lovers".

So far this year the pizza chain says it has sold an average of 1,400 vegan pizzas a day - up 50% on January last year.

Image
Caffe Nero's vegan cheesecake

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Subway vegan Meatball Marinara is "equally as delicious as the original"

And Leon says its new chipotle and avocado burger has sold better than expected. The fast food chain's vegan burgers are now out-selling other burgers.

Dominos has confirmed rumours it is "getting there" with developing a vegan pizza - but it looks like it is going to miss the chance to make the most of the Veganuary hype.

'Scream flavour, whisper health'

Alison Rabschnuk from the Good Food Institute says the timing of Veganuary is "perfect" for businesses.

"Health concerns are the primary consumer motivation for eating vegan and January is the number one month for new health-related resolutions," she says.

But she also points out that not all vegan food has to be healthy - and new foods might actually sell better if they are marketed as an indulgent treat.

"Scream flavour and whisper health" is Alison's advice. "The fact that a dish is plant-based is what cues health for the customer - there's no need to overemphasise that point."

Image
Leon's vegan burgers have outstripped animal-based burgers

Veganuary launched in 2014 as a non-profit organisation encouraging people to try out being vegan in the first month of the year by signing the Veganuary pledge.

It also supports businesses to develop plant-based products "as a way of protecting the environment, preventing animal suffering and improving the health of millions of people".

The campaign claims 200 new vegan products were launched by restaurants and supermarkets at last year's event, when 250,000 people made the pledge.

This year is even bigger.

The number of sign-ups has already surpassed 370,000 (including 150,000 in the UK) and is "steadily rising", according to Veganuary's head of marketing, Toni Vernelli - who adds the "huge response" shows the "positive action" of the campaign is "exactly what many people need right now".

Google searches for 'veganism' reach all-time high

While making money from vegan foods at this time of year should therefore be easy, some food outlets have faced barriers.

Burger King cooked up a storm with its January roll-out of the Rebel Whopper which, although made of a plant-based patty, is not strictly suitable for vegans or vegetarians because it is cooked alongside meat products.

But the Veganuary team has defended the new burger and warned non-vegan customers not to get too picky.

It argues animals are better off with non-vegans eating plant-based burgers, even if they're cooked alongside their meaty counterparts.

PETA has also urged vegans to accept this kind of practice because otherwise restaurants will be put off making vegan products.

The risk of cross-contamination posed by the Rebel Whopper is one of several issues fast food chains encounter when rolling out vegan products.

Another problem for full-time vegans is whether or not to buy food from restaurants which make most of their fortune from meat.

Vegan social influencer Emily Woolnough has been grappling with this question for a while.
KFC's zero chicken burger Image copyright KFC

Image caption The Veganuary team insists big businesses which make their money from animal products are "potential allies" for making veganism mainstream

When KFC trialled a vegan burger last year, the 20-year-old from Cleethorpes refused to eat it.

"I was against buying something from KFC because they kill millions of chickens… [and] I don't want my money to be going into that," she said.

But by the time the zero chicken burger launched across the UK on 2 January, Emily had listened to other influencers and had a change of heart.

"It's good to increase the demand for vegan food," she says - adding that the "amazing" KFC burger is her favourite Veganuary product because "it tastes so realistic".

Emma Phillips agrees it's the multinational big cheeses who will really be able to drive veganism to become mainstream.

"They're not bothered about the animals… but I don't care," she says. "No business is there in an altruistic sense. For me, if veganism is to become mainstream... it has to be convenient, it has to be accessible. So the likes of Greggs and KFC are actually pushing that agenda in the way a niche movement wouldn't do."

Toni Vernelli, head of communications at Veganuary, agrees with the bloggers about sometimes-demonised business such as KFC, McDonald's and Burger King. "We don't think we can achieve a vegan world without them," she says.

She points out the huge advertising budgets and overflowing budgets enjoyed by these companies and says, with increased demand, industry giants might invest in growing their vegan menus.

While they may not want to be too closely aligned with a store that sells 1.5m pork sausage rolls every week, Emma and Emily do have one thing in common with Greggs - they're all profiting from Veganuary.

Emma says she got 1,000 new followers in the first week of January.

And part-time Starbucks worker Emily, whose @naturally_vegan Instagram page is smaller than Emma's @veganwomble account, has still had about twice the number of new followers in the first week of January compared with her weekly average.

"Posting the new foods gains a lot of attraction," Emily says.

"It's the hot topic at the minute, it's what everyone's talking about."

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51006576
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Feb 26, 2020 1:07 am

The butcher who sells no meat!

Farmer who shunned beef over mad cow disease fears, says his crowdfunded business selling veggie alternatives is a huge success - selling in 17 countries

A ninth generation farmer revealed how he turned his back on meat - and his centuries-old family business - to launch a range of vegetarian products.

Jaap Korteweg, 57, grew up in the countryside of the Netherlands, where his family ran a farm.

In the 1990s his family farm, like so many others across Europe, found itself in the grip of mad cow disease and Jaap was forced to store tens of thousands of animal carcasses. The experience put him off beef and in 1998 he turned vegetarian.

Twelve years later Jaap launched a range of meat-free products under the name The Vegetarian Butcher and now hopes to become the world's biggest veggie butcher.

Image

Ninth generation farmer Jaap Korteweg, 57, pictured, revealed how he turned his back on meat - and his centuries-old family business - to launch a range of vegetarian products

Speaking exclusively to Femail, he said: 'For eight generations, my family owned a farm in the Dutch countryside. I took over my parents' farming business and switched to an organic agricultural system.

'When the country was in the grip of swine fever and mad cow disease, I was asked whether I could store tens of thousands of carcasses in my cold storage.

'Having witnessed this disaster, I realised I couldn't face the thought of animals going to the slaughterhouse, so I decided to go vegetarian.

'I did however miss the taste of meat, so I cut it out of my diet slowly – only eating it when I went out for a meal with people, which turned out to be quite often because I missed meat so much.

'It became clear that I had to find a way to satisfy those cravings, without actually having to eat meat from animals'.

Jaap spent three years searching for the best meat alternatives, and worked with some the The Netherlands' top meat chefs, including Paul Bom.

Image

In 2010 Jaap launched a range of meat-free products under the name The Vegetarian Butcher and now hopes to become the world's biggest veggie butcher. Pictured, veggie 'chicken'

'We worked together to create meat alternatives that would give us the same texture and taste as the original, and could work for any meat dish,' Jaap explained.

'We opted to use the same equipment as is used for animal meat, which helps us ensure our vegetarian products are as close to the real thing as possible.

'The end result reflects how the products have been designed to perfectly mimic the exact flavour, texture and experience of eating meat from animals.'

Jaap now sells a huge range of products, including meat-free magic mince, no chicken burgers, and even vegan Shawarma.

He continued: 'Our products are made by meat lovers for meat lovers – the goal is to encourage meat eaters to enjoy the same great taste, just without the animal.'

Jaap hopes that by developing better meat-free products, he will help more people adopt vegetarian and vegan diets.

'The biggest obstacle to a plant-based future is meat and dairy substitutes which lack flavour,' he said. 'Anyone who tries a poor quality meat or dairy alternative is unlikely to try one a second time.

'For that reason, my personal mission is to produce meat mimickers that taste as least as good as the real deal. I believe, if you can produce meat made from plants that is at least as delicious, you can change your consumption without changing your tradition.'

The Vegetarian Butcher is backed by Unilever and has approximately 100 employees. The products are sold in 4,000 retailers across 17 countries.

Now Jaap has his sights set on growing the business tenfold.

Reflecting on his growth so far, he said: 'When I started a crowdfunding in October 2015 to build a Vegetarian Butcher factory, within three weeks pledges maxed out at €2.5 million, the highest amount that can be legally raised through crowdfunding under Dutch law.

Image

The Vegetarian Butcher is backed by Unilever and has approximately 100 employees. The products are sold in 4,000 retailers across 17 countries. Pictured, Jaap at a store

'Our breakthrough in the Netherlands has been so overwhelming and turnover has grown so rapidly that our factory is ramping up production to supply the rest of the world.

'The plan for growing 10 times is to have the same success as we have in the Netherlands across the world, getting listings in major retailers, to encourage and enable the mass population to enjoy our plant based meat, and realise that finally you don't have to compromise when going meat free.

'The meat market is huge, there is plenty of room for competitors. I think it's possible that in 2045 about 80 per cent of meat will be plant-based.

'The same way horses were once used to pull ploughs and have been replaced by mechanical horsepower, our products will make the need for animals in our food chain a thing of the past. Some say it will be the biggest food revolution of all time! '

Want to try a vegan diet but don't know where to start?

Masterchef finalist Joey O'Hare shares her tips

Chef Joey O'Hare wowed viewers on the 2015 edition of Masterchef: The Professionals and is now senior development chef at plant-based meal company allplants.

She explained it is surprisingly simple to get the protein you need on a plant-based diet - and busted myths surrounding veganism.

Joey O'Hare, above, said it's surprisingly simple to get the protein you need

GET YOUR PROTEIN

'Whether you've already adopted a plant-based lifestyle or not, there's so much protein that can be found in plants - from pulses, to peanuts!

'For me my personal favourite go to is tempeh, because it's a fermented product and I love that slight savoury tang as well as the nutty texture.'

STOCKPILE PULSES AND GRAINS

'If you stockpile good quality pulses and grains, and stick to buying seasonal vegetables - ideally from a local market - it can be a really cost-effective way to live as well as a delicious one.

BE PLAYFUL WITH FOOD

'The tastes, flavours and textures you can create when cooking with all plants are endless - whether it's cooking up fresh portobello and chestnut mushrooms, tossed in sesame oil and roasting really hot to char, to keep their texture chewy and meaty or baking an Oreo Key Lime Pie as a treat!

'It's all about experimenting and being playful with food, such as putting spins on British classics - for example using lentils and walnuts in a bolognese, rather than beef, to enjoy with a glass of red wine on the sofa!'

TREAT VEGGIES LIKE MEAT

'My top tip is to treat veggies exactly like meat. If you focus on dry-rubs, marinades, charring and roasting you'll always end up with awesome, complex flavour!

She added that while a vegan diet can be exciting and full of flavours, people can often fall into traps and eat badly.

DON'T USE IT AS AN EXCUSE

'One trap is the assumption that a vegan diet is automatically healthy and therefore anything goes.

'A diet packed of white bread, crisps, margarine and oreos is vegan diet, but it's far from balanced! Prioritising seasonal vegetables and wholefoods is key, vegan or otherwise.'

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food ... vegan.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:52 am

Cadbury to launch
milk-free Dairy Milk


The owners of one of the UK's most cherished chocolate brands Cadbury are developing a milk-free Dairy Milk bar

Image

Mondelez wants to create a plant-based alternative amid a growing demand for vegan options.

The company is said to have been searching for a dairy free recipe for about two years and was due to launch its new product in January to tie in with Veganuary.

However, the group - which also owns Toblerone and Philadelphia cream cheese - has delayed the release in order to find more time to find a milk-less option also suitable for those with nut allergies.
[mondelez-cadburys.jpg]

Mondelez are following a worldwide trend towards veganism (AFP/Getty Images)

A Mondelez spokesperson said: “We’re always listening to our consumers so we can develop and provide people with greater choice.

“This includes looking at a plant-based Cadbury Dairy Milk bar.

“However, we have no immediate plans to launch.

“We are only interested in launching a new vegan product that retains the texture and taste that our consumers expect and love.”

Dairy Milk bars are 115 years old, with the first bar made in a Birmingham factory in 1905.

Cadbury became famous for its purple wrapper and "glass half full" slogan, which it dropped in 2010 to comply with EU metric regulations.

Cadbury is not alone in creating plant-based products with pasty kings Greggs' and chicken gurus KFC also following suit (Greggs)

The chocolate maker is no stranger to following a trend for healthier food, and last year brought out a version of its chocolate that included 30 per cent less sugar.

Vegan products are in such high demand that other food companies have been developing products over the past few years.

Greggs launched its vegan sausage roll to great acclaim and followed it by launching a vegan steak bake.

Even KFC, who previously offered no vegetarian or vegan options have now put up an offering, launching their vegan burger under the slogan 'Fingerlickin' Vegan' at the beginning of January.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/cadb ... 69731.html
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Mar 15, 2020 11:30 pm

Food With the
Longest Shelf Life


Image

1. Potatoes
> Shelf life: 2 to 5 weeks

If stored in a cool, dry, dark place. Yukon Gold, red, and fingerling potatoes will last from two to three weeks. Larger white or russet potatoes can last for three to five weeks. Sweet potatoes have about the same shelf life. Don’t store them next to onions, however: The two might go together well in cooking, but raw, each gives off gases and moisture that might cause the other to spoil faster.

Image

2. Onions
> Shelf life: 1 to 2 months

As with potatoes, store these in a cool, dry, dark place for maximum longevity. And, as above, don’t store them with potatoes; both will spoil faster

3. Peanuts
> Shelf life: 1 to 2 months

Peanuts in their shell, especially when kept cool and dry, are perfectly happy in the pantry for as long as two months.

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4. Winter squash
> Shelf life: 1 to 3 months

The various kinds of thick-skinned winter squash — including butternut, spaghetti, acorn, kabocha, and hubbard, among others — are among the most durable of fresh vegetables.

Image

5. Apples
> Shelf life: 5 days to 6 months

Apples kept in a fruit bowl at room temperature will generally last five to seven days. When stored in a humid place at a temperature of 30º to 40º F, however, they can stay crisp and fresh for as long as six months.

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6. Tea
> Shelf life: 6 to 12 months past “best by” date

Dried tea leaves, whether loose (in a sealed container) or in teabags (in an unopened box) can easily last a year or more if they’re not subjected to moisture or humidity. The tea does tend to lose flavor over time, though.

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7. Powdered milk
> Shelf life: 1 to 1½ years

The color, texture, or flavor of powdered milk might change as it ages, but it will still be perfectly usable and safe for at least 18 months.

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8. Beef jerky
> Shelf life: 1 to 2 years

Beef jerky and its predecessors in various parts of the world were invented to last a long time as sustenance in the wilderness and on long journeys. It’s lean, dry, and salted — all qualities that add to its ability to stay edible for a long time.

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9. Canned fruits and vegetables
> Shelf life: 1 to 2 years past “best by” date

Canning is an extremely efficient means of preserving food. Generally speaking, if canned foods aren’t subjected to intense heat, their contents should stay good for two years or more. Beware, however, of dented cans or those with swollen tops, which may indicate the presence of bacteria inside.

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10. Dried pasta
> Shelf life: 1 to 2 years past “best by” date

Made with just semolina flour and water, then thoroughly dried, this pasta is fairly indestructible. Its richer counterpart, fresh pasta, usually made with eggs, is much more perishable and should always be kept refrigerated.

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11. Bouillon cubes
> Shelf life: 2 years

Oxygen and moisture are the enemies of these useful little blocks of instant soup or stock. Keep them dry and well sealed, and 24 months is probably the minimum they’ll last.

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12. Peanut butter
> Shelf life: 2 years

An unopened jar of peanut butter should last longer than a couple of years at room temperature, but with time, the oil will separate, the peanut butter might dry out, and the flavor may fade. Two years is likely the maximum for the best quality.

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13. Dark chocolate
> Shelf life: 2 to 5 years

Because milk chocolate contains dairy, it will go bad more quickly than chocolate with high cacao content and little or no milk. Warm temperatures are the enemy of dark chocolate, and while it should last for a couple of years at temperatures up to around 75º F, it will keep for as long as five years if the thermometer rests between 60º and 65º F. Chocolate exposed to high temperatures can develop white spots, but these are harmless and don’t affect the flavor.

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14. Canned or vacuum-pouched tuna
> Shelf life: 3 to 5 years after “best by” date

Tuna is a hardy fish and one that takes well to canning (and in more recent times, to vacuum-packing in pouches). For optimum flavor and texture, don’t keep it longer than five years after the producer’s “best by” date.

Image

15. Dried beans
> Shelf life: Indefinite

Dried beans are pretty much indestructible if they’re kept dry, though they begin to lose their moisture after a year or two. As they age, they will require longer presoaking and/or cooking times to become tender.

Image

16. Honey
> Shelf life: Indefinite

Though honey is often sold with a “best by” date (usually somewhere between two and five years from the time it’s packaged), that’s because over time it may darken and form sugar crystals — perfectly harmless, but off-putting to some consumers. Pure 100% undiluted honey in an unopened jar (stored away from heat) will still be edible years, decades, probably generations down the road.

17. Liquor
> Shelf life: Indefinite

Everybody knows that wine can last a long time, sometimes greatly improving as it ages. But it can also go bad quickly through exposure to extreme heat or cold, oxidation through leaky corks, and just the natural evolution of its chemical constituents over time. Not so hard liquor. Unopened bottles of spirits are virtually unchanging. Their high alcohol content preserves them and they don’t age. The only exception is with some sweet liqueurs, from which, as the years pass, some of the sugar content will precipitate out, forming crystals and leaving the liqueur slightly less sweet.

18. White rice
> Shelf life: Indefinite
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Mar 31, 2020 3:51 am

Blood test can check
for 50 types of cancer


A simple blood test can check for more than 50 types of cancer, often before any signs or symptoms, scientists say

It could help diagnose tumours sooner, when they are easier to treat and, ideally, cure, experts hope.

More than 99% of positive results are accurate, the team says, but it will be crucial to check it does not miss cases and provide false assurance.

Doctors are using it in trials with patients but more studies are needed, they say in Annals of Oncology.

Trial data suggests it is better at detecting more advanced disease rather than the beginnings of cancer, which may limit how useful it becomes.

How does it work?

The test looks for telltale chemical changes to bits of genetic code - cell-free DNA - that leak from tumours into the bloodstream.

The researchers, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, working with UK colleagues from The Francis Crick Institute and University College London, tested more than 4,000 samples from patients - some with and some without cancer.

More than 50 types of cancer, such as bowel, lung and ovarian, were included.

And in 96% of the samples, the test accurately detected the type of cancer.

What do experts say?

The study is funded by Grail, the maker of the blood test.

One of the lead researchers, Prof Geoff Oxnard, said: "This blood test seems to have all the features needed to be used on a population scale, as a multi-cancer screening test.

"Everyone asks when will a test like this will be ready for use.

"Based upon this successful clinical validation in thousands of patients, the test has actually now been launched for limited use on clinical trials.

"But before this blood test is used routinely, we will probably need to see results from clinical studies like this to more fully understand the test performance.

"Certainly the field is moving quickly and it makes us hopeful that blood-based cancer detection will be a reality."

Cancer Research UK early detection head Dr David Crosby said: "Detecting cancers at their earliest stages, when they are less aggressive and more treatable, has a huge potential to save lives and we sorely need tech innovations that can turn this potential into reality.

"Although this test is still at an early stage of development, the initial results are encouraging.

"And if the test can be fine-tuned to be more efficient at catching cancers in their earliest stages, it could become a tool for early detection.

"But more research is needed to improve the test's ability to catch early cancers and we still need to explore how it might work in a real cancer-screening scenario."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-52090359
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Re: Food Room

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Apr 06, 2020 4:57 pm

Quick as a FLASH!

Scientists find way to deliver ENTIRE COURSE of cancer treatment in less than a second

New research may revolutionize how cancer patients are treated after showing that it’s possible to give people an entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second instead of over several weeks.

In a study published on Thursday, scientists show how their potentially paradigm-shifting method, known as FLASH radiotherapy, has the same effect on tumors as traditional radiation therapy and it gets the job done in a fraction of the time.

Boffins from the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center have taken the first steps in making the revolutionary treatment a reality by detailing how they used proton radiation to generate the dosage needed to theoretically give a cancer patient their entire course of radiotherapy in just one brief sitting.

The study also found that the FLASH method was less harmful to healthy tissue because of the shorter exposure time.

“This is the first time anyone has published findings that demonstrate the feasibility of using protons rather than electrons to generate FLASH doses, with an accelerator currently used for clinical treatments,” explained the study’s co-senior author James M Metz.

Previous groups of researchers have tried the approach with conventional photons, but currently available treatment devices failed to generate the necessary dosage.

The high levels of radiation required to deliver the treatment rapidly saturate radiation detectors, so the University of Pennsylvania team had to develop the tools needed to effectively and accurately measure treatment doses.

Also on rt.com Cancer patient dies after being set on FIRE during operation in Romania

“We’ve been able to develop specialized systems in the research room to generate FLASH doses, demonstrate that we can control the proton beam, and perform a large number of experiments to help us understand the implications of FLASH radiation that we simply could not have done with a more traditional research setup,” Metz said.

The team say they are already beginning to optimize how they would use their techniques in clinical trials.

https://www.rt.com/news/477811-cancer-r ... ne-second/
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