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Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

A place for discussion and exchanging ideas about Kurdistan issues here, also a place for sharing article & views and analysis about Kurdistan .

Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Piling » Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:35 am

“Uninformed citizens may think that the atrocities committed by this ISIS bride perpetrator are an exception,” she told Kurdistan 24. “That is not true. ISIS women were among the most brutal. It is just by good fortune that she was stupid enough to admit her crimes to an undercover FBI agent.”


Exactly. I am sick of seeing them whining and moaning and presenting themselves as victims. No one have ever stated the slightest remorse for what they did. Bitches.
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Apr 11, 2019 2:41 am

A recent bill that seeks to reintegrate Yezidi women and their children into society and to economically empower them presented to the Iraqi parliament by President Barham Salih is “significant,” according to global activist NGO Yazda.

“We find the resolution to be significant, in fact this is the most significant piece of legislation ever with respect to the Yazidis in Iraq to be discussed within the framework for Iraq,” Yazda commented to Rudaw English on Tuesday

Yazda hopes the bill might provide “a life with dignity” to the victims who still face “unimaginable hardship.”

The Iraqi presidency revealed on Sunday that it had sent the “Yazidi Survivors Bill” to parliament on March 28, 2019.

The bill “aims to compensate the survivors financially and psychologically, rehabilitate them, and take care of them, ensuring a dignified life for them…”

Iraq and the Kurdistan Region — where most Yezidis live as IDPs — lack sufficient psychosocial facilities. The gap hasn’t been adequately addressed, according to NGOs in the field, which say the focus is primarily on security, stability, and return

“… the bill also aims to use the necessary methods to integrate the survivors in the community and rehabilitating the infrastructure of their area”, added the readout.

Iraq state media network published the contents of the bill that focuses heavily on economic empowerment for Yazidi survivors and the children born fathered by Islamic State (ISIS) fighters.

The bill was issued due to “the psychological, social and health damages ISIS inflicted on those women and children” they kidnapped and to “resolve the negative effects” of survivors, providing them with their rights, and to internationally have the genocide recognized.

“We also find two crucial clauses in the draft resolution: recognition of the crimes against Yazidi women and girls as genocide and a clear language to prevent amnesty for ISIS members involved in these crimes,” Yazda added.

The bill stipulates the establishment of a Directorate for Yazidi Affairs, run by a Yazidi director general with a university degree and experience, based in Nineveh, tied to the Council of Ministers with administrative and fiscal independence.

The bill identifies five of its goals: To rehabilitate and take care of the survivors, psychological and financial compensation, to provide “dignified” lives, to rebuild infrastructure in their areas, and to reintegrate them.

“We also hope that the geopolitical programs of Shingal will be addressed, as most Yezidis remain displaced without a prospective of return,” added Yazda.

A host of militias and official forces are in control of different parts of Shingal: the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)-linked groups like the Shingal Protection Units (YBS), Iraqi Army, Provincial Police, Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Peshmerga linked forces, Ezidkhan, and the Hashd al-Shaabi

Recently, clashes have erupted twice between the Iraqi Army and YBS forces, causing fear among the populace as multiple members of both sides were killed.

The proposed Yazidi Affairs Directorate is to compile data on the survivors, take care of the survivors, provide them with “safe shelters” and housing, and “resolve the legal status of the surviving mothers’ children…”

A “Court of First Instance” is to be set up to resolve the citizenship documents of the children.

Also, the directorate is to provide educational opportunities for the survivors and their children, job opportunities, health centers for treating the survivors, and special clinics for psychological, social and professional care.

“The survivors are to be given priority in public employment opportunities,” it reads.

“Whom the provisions of this bill encompasses are to be given a monthly salary no less than twice the minimum retirement pension as stipulated in the Unified Pensions Law number 9 of the year 2014,” it added.

The female survivors are also to be given a piece of residential land or a free housing compound.

The bill sets August 3 of every year as a national commemoration date of the crimes committed against the Yezidis. The Ministry of Culture and relevant authorities are to “immortalize” the victims by building statues, sculptures and exhibitions on the commemoration dates.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Iraq’s Human Rights Commission is to work on having the crime recognized as a genocide internationally “to cooperate in handing over the criminals to be put on trial in Iraq,” and those complicit in the crime can never have amnesty or a pardon.

Iraqi PM Adil Abdul-Mahdi on March 12 announced that Yezidi survivors would receive 2 million dinars ($1,680) in compensation — independent of the president’s announcement.

“In the Ministry of Immigration and Migrants, the allocation of grants of 2 million dinars to Yezidi captives, whose number exceeds or is close to 800 captives, has been finalized,” Abdul-Mahdi said during a weekly press conference.

The United Nations Investigative Team for the Promotion of Accountability for Crimes Committed by ISIS announced on April 1 that it would continue to investigate suspected Yezidi mass grave sites after successful digs with their Iraqi colleagues in March.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/people-places/09042019
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:02 am

A host of militias and official forces are in control of different parts of Shingal: the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)-linked groups like the Shingal Protection Units (YBS), Iraqi Army, Provincial Police, Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Peshmerga linked forces, Ezidkhan, and the Hashd al-Shaabi

I think that we should call on the UN to implement the removal of all non-Yazidi troops within the Sinjar region

And the removal of all Arabs within the Sinjar region - remembering that Arabs cannot be trusted and a great many of the sided with ISIS against their Yazidi neighbours

What do the Yazidis themselves want:

    Return of their missing 3,000 friends and relations

    Warm dry SAFE place to live instead of leaky tents

    Removal of ALL military factions from their land

    UN protection from future attacks

    Their homes, villages, businesses, hospitals, schools rebuilt

    A chance to recover from the past and plan for a future
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Apr 12, 2019 12:53 am

Clearing Sinjar of PKK crucial for Ankara

Ankara called on Baghdad yesterday to clear PKK terrorists from the Sinjar region to ensure the security of both countries and strengthen the territorial integrity of Iraq

"Iraq's full authority and control over Sinjar is not only significant for Turkey but also for Iraq's territorial integrity, safety and stability," Turkey's Ambassador to Baghdad Fatih Yıldız told Anadolu Agency (AA) in Iraq's western Mosul province.

Yıldız underscored that Turkey is ready to provide cooperation and support to Iraqi authorities to prevent Sinjar from turning into another Qandil, referring to the PKK headquarters in the Qandil mountains in northern Iraq.

Turkey has long been stressing that it will not tolerate terror threats posed against its national security and has called on Iraqi officials to take the necessary steps to eliminate the terrorist group. Ankara has also previously underlined that if the expected steps are not taken, it will not shy away from targeting terror threats, particularly in Sinjar.

The Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) regularly conduct cross-border operations in northern Iraq, a region where PKK terrorists have hideouts and bases from which to carry out attacks in Turkey. In mid-2014, the PKK managed to establish a foothold in Sinjar on the pretext that it was protecting the local Yazidi community from Daesh.

Since then, the PKK has reportedly established ground in Sinjar as a new base for its logistical and command-and-control activities. Iraq's Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) previously said that the PKK's presence in Sinjar is unacceptable and called for the militants to leave the area.

In its more than 30-year terror campaign against Turkey, the PKK, listed as a terrorist organization by Turkey, the U.S. and the EU, has been responsible for the deaths of some 40,000 people, including women and children. The terrorist organization isn't just active in Turkey but operates throughout the region, particularly in Syria and Iraq.

During his visit, Yıldız also met with the Turkish Naval Forces' diver team that participated in search operations in the aftermath of the ferry disaster on the Tigris River. In the incident, nearly 100 people lost their lives.

The ambassador underlined that Turkey exerted efforts to provide support to Mosul regarding the incident. He added that Turkey and Mosul have strong historical and cultural ties. In relation to Turkey's efforts to open an embassy in Mosul, Yıldız said that Turkey's expectations regarding the issue would be conveyed to local authorities in Mosul as well as to Baghdad.

https://www.dailysabah.com/war-on-terro ... ra-baghdad
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:13 pm

Another mass grave opened in Kocho village in Shengal

DAESH (ISIS) terrorists launched a genocidal aggression against the land of Kurdish Yazidi ethnic community, Shengal town in southern Kurdistan, on August 3, 2014

Thousands of Yazidis were massacred and buried in mass graves during the first wave of attacks. Thousands of women and girls were abducted and degraded into sex slaves. It has been years since the Yazidi massacre, but the fate of numerous Yazidis is still not known.

Excavation began on Friday morning in a second mass grave in the Kocho village in Shengal where a total of 9 mass graves have been detected so far.

The first mass grave had been excavated in Kocho village on March 15 as part of a program run by the Iraqi government and the UN. Work in this mass grave lasted 5 days. Experts took DNA samples from the corpses and established these to be of 28 people.

The DNA samples were reportedly sent to the Forensic Medicine Institute in Baghdad to determine the identities of the victims.
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Apr 13, 2019 11:58 pm

Syria Kurds return 25 Yazidis freed from ISIS to Iraq

QAZLAJOKH, Syria – Syrian Kurds on Saturday repatriated 25 women and children from Iraq's Yezidi minority after freeing them during the final push against the Islamic State group, a local official said

The US-backed fighters say they rescued some 300 Yezidi women and children during the fight to take the jihadists' last scrap of territory in eastern Syria.

"Today, we will hand over 25 people -- 10 women and 15 children -- to the Yezidi council in Shinga," said Ziyad Rustam, an official with the Kurdish-run group Yezidi House, which reunites rescued Yezidi children with surviving relatives.

"They will be sent to their families," he told AFP.

At the Yezidi House headquarters in a village near the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli, women wearing colorful robes collected children scampering around the compound before boarding busses bound for Shingal, the Yezidi heartland in Iraq.

"The fate of my three sisters remains unknown... I don't know anything about them," said 17-year-old Jamila Haidar.

"I hope we will be reunited soon."

Iraq's Yezidis are a symbol of the suffering caused by the Islamic State (IS) group during its rein over vast swathes of Syria and Iraq.

The jihadists stormed through Iraq's northwest in 2014 slaughtering thousands of men and boys and abducting women and girls to be abused as sex slaves.

But they have since lost all of the once-sprawling cross-border "caliphate" to multiple offensive.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces last month announced the defeat of the IS proto-state after tens of thousands of people streamed out of the jihadists' last patch of territory, around the village of Baghouz near the Iraqi border.

Rustam said SDF had in total liberated 850 Yezidi women and children during its battles against IS since 2015.

But 3,040 Yezidis are still missing, he said, adding that the search for them was ongoing

Rustam said the jihadists had "sold many of them to people inside Syria, in places like Idlib", most of which is held by a former Al-Qaeda affiliate.

Some of the Yezidis extracted from IS's last sliver of territory are being held at the Kurdish-run Al-Hol camp, which also houses jihadist family members.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/syria/130420191
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Apr 16, 2019 12:32 pm

Experts find another mass grave in
Shingal thought to contain 500 Yezidis


The remains of hundreds of Yezidis executed by Islamic State (ISIS) militants are believed to have been discovered at a mass grave in Kocho, Shingal

It's one of 15 burial sites in the village of Kocho, a Yezidi village in the Shingal district.

The Iraqi government, the International Commission on Missing Persons and the United Nations are conducting an exhumation of the suspected mass grave sites.

"The bodies in this grave will be sent directly to the forensic department in Baghdad, and I went to Baghdad and visited the laboratories and saw the process there," said Haitham Ahmad who has lost four family members.

In the summer of 2014, the ethno-religious Yezidi minority in northwestern Iraq and the Kurdistan Region were targeted by Islamic State (ISIS) extremists streaming from Raqqa to Mosul across the border with Syria.

"I am confident that the crimes of Daesh will be revealed through the examination of these bodies. It (the examination result) will be stored by them until all the 15 mass graves in Kocho, 14 inside Kocho itself and one in Sulag, are exhumed and only then can we receive them officially and give them a proper burial," added Ahmad.

Only 26 bodies have been recovered so far at the site in Kocho, although 500 victims' remains are through to be buried there.

Kocho is one of the southernmost villages in the Yezidi homeland of Shingal.

Nayif Jaso is the mayor of Kocho village. The village is still grieving for those they lost.

"There are about 380 people from the village who were slaughtered here. They were all our people. They were all our uncles and cousins and there is no hope left," he said.

More than 70 mass graves were identified in the Shingal district after it was liberated from ISIS in November 2015. Some have been washed away by heavy rains, others exhumed by locals — much to the regret of the official teams.

"But our major demand is to receive their bodies, forensically identified, so they can be buried and have a grave just like any other human being," the mayor added.

The fate of thousands of missing Yezidi men and women remains unknown as the ISIS group was defeated militarily in Iraq in 2017 and in Syria last month.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/iraq/16042019
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Apr 16, 2019 9:28 pm

With red flowers, Yezidis
prepare to welcome the New Year


Yezidis are preparing for their New Year with hope the year will bring mercy and good tidings

The Yezidi New Year takes place at “the beginning of spring,” explained religious leader Baba Chawesh. “Yezidis believe that life began on a Wednesday.”

On Chwarshama Sur – Red Wednesday – hundreds of Yezidis will don their traditional clothes and visit the holy temple in Lalish in Duhok to mark the day Tawuse Melek, the Peacock Angel who is God's representative on earth, descended on the holy site to bless the earth with fertility and renewal.

Preparations include boiling and coloring eggs. “This is part of our New Year where we boil the eggs… It’s interesting as it’s now spring. It’s a celebration, so we enjoy it. Hopefully these [traditions] will be preserved,” Khazal Sulaiman, a Yezidi man, told Rudaw.

Women prepare the eggs while men throw the shells into their fields to bring good luck.

“Our existence depends on this crop,” said farmer Sheikh Ismail Mirzo. “We throw the egg shells into these fields so God will have mercy on us and bring good luck.”

Young people pick red flowers to wear on their clothes and adorn the gates of their homes.

At Lalish, 366 flames will be lit – one for each day in the Yezidi calendar.

The religious minority suffered genocide under the Islamic State (ISIS) when militants took control of Shingal in 2014, killing hundreds of Yezidi men and enslaving thousands of women and children.

Forced from their homes, spread across the world as refugees, and mourning their missing loved ones, Yezidis did not celebrate their New Year for several years. Last year they held their first celebration, under the shadow of the genocide.

Iraq, with the assistance of the United Nations, has begun exhuming mass graves believed to hold the remains of hundreds of Yezidis executed by ISIS. Dozens of Yezidi women and children have been found in northern Syria after the military defeat of the group and are expected to be reunited with their families soon. But the fate of 2,992 Yezidis are still unknown, according to the most recent figures from the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG)’s office of Yezidi affairs.

“I reiterate that I will support the demands of our Yezidi sisters and brothers as much as I can, and everyone shall help them to determine their fate and future,” said Masoud Barzani, head of the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) in a statement on Chwarshama Sur.

Iraq’s Parliament Speaker Mohammed al-Halbousi also issued a statement of congratulations.

We wish the Yezidi people a “blessed and lasting holiday under a unified and secure Iraq that protects everyone without exception,” he stated, adding that the parliament leadership is committed to adopting the Yezidi Survivors Bill, a piece of legislation recently introduced to provide assistance to the victims of ISIS.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/160420191
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 17, 2019 12:28 am

Please click on images to enlarge:

1150

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1141
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:13 am

HAPPY NEW YEAR

TO ALL OUR YAZIDI FRIENDS

AND THEIR SUPPORTERS

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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:47 pm

Iraq frees Frenchman who
entered Syria to support Yazidis


It is unclear why Syrian Kurdsih forces or the US-led coalition handed the man to Iraqi authorities

An Iraqi court said on Thursday it had released a French national who spent two months in detention after being transferred from war-ravaged Syria as it found no proof he fought there.

Instead, the Baghdad court said, their interrogations had found the unnamed Frenchman travelled to Syria "in support of the Yazidi cause".

In February, the US-led coalition fighting ISIS handed to Iraqi authorities 13 French nationals caught in ISIS's dwindling "caliphate" in east Syria.

All 13 were thought to be members of ISIS's feared contingent of foreign fighters, and Iraqi President Barham Saleh pledged they would be tried "according to Iraqi law".

But as Iraqi prosecutors began investigating, "terrorism" cases were only prepared against 12 nationals.

On Thursday, the Karkh Special Investigations Court for Terrorism Issues in Baghdad announced it "let go one of the 13 accused French nationals due to a lack of evidence".

After months of investigations, the court said: "There was no proof of his involvement in any military activities, and his entry [to Syria] was in support of the Yazidi cause".

During ISIS's rampage across northern Iraq in 2014, it slaughtered thousands of members of the Yazidi community and seized its women and girls as sex slaves.

The atrocities prompted the US-led coalition to begin a military intervention against ISIS in Iraq, which it then expanded into Syria by backing a Kurdish-led fighting force.

That force, the Syrian Democratic Forces, attracted hundreds of foreign fighters who wanted to join the fight against ISIS.

The court found that the French national entered Syria "legally," but did not say which border crossing he used or what exactly he was doing there.

It also remains unclear why the SDF or the US-led coalition handed him over to Iraqi authorities along with suspected militants if he had been supporting Yazidis, which would have put him on the other side of the front line against ISIS.

With the collapse of ISIS's self-styled "caliphate" last month, dozens of kidnapped Yazidi women and children have been freed.

3,000 are still missing

https://www.thenational.ae/world/mena/i ... s-1.850960
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Apr 19, 2019 11:55 pm

Why Iraq's courts aren't recognising
ISIS crimes against the Yazidis


More than four years after the Islamic State group [ISIS] invaded Sinjar, Iraq's prisons are filled with men the government says committed crimes against the country's Yazidi community. But in a system that prioritises efficiency over accountability, justice remains elusive

In what the United Nations described as a genocide against the Yazidis, thousands of members of this religious minority were enslaved, raped and slaughtered when IS stormed their ancestral homeland of Sinjar in August 2014.

Despite overwhelming evidence of the atrocities carried out by the group – including social media posts and videos in which IS members bragged about buying and selling women – to this day, almost no one has been held accountable in Iraq for specific crimes against the Yazidis.

Rather than bring charges for offences listed in the criminal code, such as rape or murder, Iraq's judicial authorities have been prosecuting suspects solely for membership in a terrorist organisation.

It's a more efficient way of building and prosecuting cases, explained Akila Radhakrishnan, President of the Global Justice Center.

"I think there's definitely been a push towards let's get them prosecuted, let's get them in jail," said Radhakrishnan. "Proving membership in a terrorist organisation from an elements perspective is much easier to do than for a particular crime."

According to a 2018 analysis by the Associated Press, Iraq has detained or imprisoned at least 19,000 people on terrorism-related charges since 2013. Prosecuting that number of people would be a massive undertaking for any country, much less one that just emerged from a bloody and costly war.

"The judges try to do their work as fast as possible because there's a lot of pressure," said Dr Zyad Saeed, an Iraqi lawyer who advises and trains other lawyers handling terrorism-related cases.

"A judge in an international court sees one case per year," Saeed said. "Iraqi judges see 150 cases per day."

Given the sheer number of cases, Iraqi judicial officials argue it's simply not feasible for the country's overwhelmed and under-resourced courts to gather evidence of specific crimes.

"The response that we make to that is you shouldn't have 19,000 men in prison," said Belkis Wille, senior Iraq researcher at Human Rights Watch. "You are prosecuting people who don't need to be prosecuted."

Despite concerns raised by human rights groups over the mass incarceration of ISIS suspects, Iraq has doled out thousands of convictions under its vaguely worded counterterrorism law, which prescribes the death penalty for anyone who commits or assists in a terrorist act.

That catch-all language doesn't differentiate between ISIS fighters and those who merely acquiesced when their cities fell under ISIS control. An ISIS garbage collector could easily get the same sentence as someone who enslaved and raped a Yazidi woman.

"These aren't the people that should be taking up the time of judges in courtrooms," Wille said.

Critics of the Iraqi government's current approach to prosecuting ISIS suspects argue that when everyone is prosecuted under the umbrella of terrorism, the more serious crimes against Yazidis go unrecognised, preventing much-needed healing and closure in the community.

"These are specific crimes," said Pari Ibrahim, founder and executive director at the Free Yezidi Foundation. "If they go unpunished, it sends a message to the perpetrators and also to the victimised community that the justice system does not serve them."

Having studied law in the Netherlands, Ibrahim is helping provide legal resources through her organisation to Yazidi women who want to see justice in the courts. Most she says are interested in exacting an eye-for-an-eye style of revenge on the terrorists.

"When I say what is possible and what is not possible in the legal systems, generally survivors are quite disappointed," Ibrahim said.

If given the opportunity, Ibrahim says those same women would not hesitate to testify against their perpetrators in a court of law. But because Iraqi authorities are trying suspects for violating the counterterrorism law, rather than specific crimes, there is no role in court for the victims of those crimes.

It's not for a lack of Yazidis ready and willing to act as witnesses, says Ahmed Khudida Burjus, the deputy executive director at advocacy group Yazda.

"We are getting messages from hundreds of Yazidis saying 'we are ready to testify.' Show us where to go," Burjus said. "But there is nowhere. There is no door open for them."

In addition to gathering evidence at dozens of mass graves and kill sites in the Sinjar region, Yazda staff have conducted interviews with Yazidi witnesses to ISIS crimes. Burjus says his organisation has recorded nearly 500 testimonies, some over four hours long.

"We have information about ISIS, ISIS members and their crimes. But there is nowhere to submit it," Burjus said.

The creation of a special UN team designed to document IS crimes is an encouraging sign. The team, known as UNITAD, is gathering evidence of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide for possible use in Iraqi legal proceedings. In March, UNITAD forensic and legal experts helped exhume the first of more than 70 mass graves dug by ISIS in Sinjar.

"This is a step forward, but at the end of the day, we have to ask, where will all this information go," said Free Yezidi Foundation's Ibrahim.

In the end, many Yazidis like Ibrahim question whether UNITAD will produce meaningful results given its mandate.

"It's only to collect and preserve the evidence, which we welcome, but we don't know what will happen next," Burjas said.

At issue is whether UN staff could even hand over evidence to Iraq, given the country's use of the death penalty and the UN's position that capital punishment is a grave human rights violation.

In a statement provided to The New Arab, UNITAD spokesperson William De'Athe Morris said the investigators will "share evidence in accordance with United Nations policies and best practices, and relevant international law."

Some legal experts have speculated the UN could make arrangements with Iraq to suspend the possibility of the death penalty for cases in which UNITAD's evidence is used.

Meanwhile, as the Yazidis continue to plead with Iraqi authorities and the international community to deliver justice, some 3,000 women and girls taken captive by ISIS are still missing. Hundreds of thousands more remain displaced.

When Ibrahim visits camps and shelters throughout northern Iraq, she meets with Yazidi women and girls who managed to escape ISIS slavery.

"All of the sudden, someone will pick me out and say, 'Hey Pari, I need to tell you that I saw my perpetrator.'" They provide details of what their captor looked like. Some have names and photos.

In the cases of foreign fighters, and with permission from the victim, Free Yezidi Foundation has shared the information with Western governments in the hopes the ISIS member will be tried in more reliable courts.

Recently, a 27-year-old German woman was put on trial in Munich in what's considered to be the first prosecution for war crimes committed against the Yazidis. But in Iraq, Ibrahim has lowered her expectations for accountability.

"I have very little trust in the system," Ibrahim said. "Justice is not a priority."

https://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/indep ... he-yazidis
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:30 pm

4 PKK terrorists brought to Turkey from
Iraq in operation by Turkish intelligence


Four PKK terrorists nabbed by security forces at Iraq's Mount Sinjar have been brought to Turkey as part of an operation by the Turkish intelligence services, reports said Monday

The terrorists were reportedly brought to Turkey and handed over to counterterror police on Thursday.

Identified by their initials as V.K., M.K., A.Ö., and K.İ., the terrorists had received training from the People's Protection Units (YPG) in Syria and crossed the border to Iraq.

V.K. reportedly joined the PKK in 2010 and was responsible for carrying out attacks against the Turkish Armed Forces near Sinjar region.

The terrorist was in hiding after he raped a disabled 11-year-old Yazidi child in March.

Turkey has long been stressing that it will not tolerate terror threats posed against its national security and has called on Iraqi officials to take the necessary steps to eliminate the terrorist group. Ankara has also previously underlined that if the expected steps are not taken, it will not shy away from targeting terror threats, particularly in Sinjar.

The Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) regularly conduct cross-border operations in northern Iraq, a region where PKK terrorists have hideouts and bases from which to carry out attacks in Turkey. In mid-2014, the PKK managed to establish a foothold in Sinjar on the pretext that it was protecting the local Yazidi community from Daesh.

Since then, the PKK has reportedly established ground in Sinjar as a new base for its logistical and command-and-control activities. Iraq's Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) previously said that the PKK's presence in Sinjar is unacceptable and called for the militants to leave the area.

https://www.dailysabah.com/war-on-terro ... telligence

ALL NON-YAZIDIS MUST LEAVE YAZIDI LAND

I do not care who they are - the Yazidis should be protected by UN peacekeeping forces from ALL non-Yazidi fighters

Yazidis deserve support and help to rebuild their homes, lands, businesses and way of life

Yazidis have commuted NO crimes - they should NOT still be living in camps or leaky tents on the mountains

Most of all: Yazidis need their 3,000 ISIS captives FREED
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Apr 23, 2019 11:01 am

Symposium examines challenges
faced by the Yazidi People


This week, the Genocide Studies Program at Yale is hosting a symposium titled “The Yazidi Genocide: Prosecution, Protection, and Preservation,” which focuses on ISIL’s genocide of the Yazidi ethnic minority in Iraq

The symposium, open to Yalies and New Haven residents, began on Thursday with a keynote conversation between Director of Genocide Studies David Simon and Nadia Murad — a Yazidi human rights activist and a recipient of the 2018 Nobel Peace. Murad was among the Yazidi women captured by ISIL in 2014, but she managed to escape and now advocates around the world for the ethnic minority.

During the keynote conversation, Murad emphasized the importance of rebuilding and finding a political solution for the Yazidis’ home — a town in Iraq called Sinjar. Both the Iraqi government and the Kurdish people are fighting over the land, and the town currently has multiple militant groups policing it. At the end of the conversation, Murad encouraged Yale students who want to help the Yazidi to advocate for the community, because the Yazidi people themselves often do not have the freedom to use their voices as much as students can.

“Most of the help that the Yazidi get is from ordinary people, like student volunteers,” Murad said.

The symposium will continue on Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. with three panels, focusing on how to prosecute those responsible for the genocide, how to protect the Yazidi individuals in Iraq and abroad and how to promote and preserve Yazidi culture and identity.

“[The main goal of the symposium is to] bring in experts on a variety of subjects related to the Yazidi genocide, to address some of the legal, political, and social challenges facing the Yazidi community in the wake of the 2014 genocide, and to consider strategies to help, moving forward,” said the Director of Genocide Studies at Yale David Simon.

The Genocide Studies Program at the Yale Macmillan Center was founded in 1998 and conducts research, seminars and conferences on issues related to genocide in addition to trainings of researchers from genocide afflicted regions.

Hira Jafri, director of global programs at the MacMillan Center and one of the organizers of the symposium, told the News that she hopes the event will lead to more support for the Yazidi community.

“This symposium addresses an important concern of the world and an admittedly understudied group of people here at Yale,” Jafri said. “We hope that by bringing scholars, activists, and community organizers together we can tackle lingering questions and concerns that exist to support this community.”

Simon added that the University decided to focus on the Yazidi this year because they are currently a “particularly vulnerable group, as a double or even a triple minority,” and they have been the victims of a genocide several times in recorded history.

Simon said that the organizers decided to bring Murad to kick off the symposium because “she has a compelling story to tell, and a strong vision of what humanity must do in the face of threats of genocide.”

Attendees told the News that they found the event inspiring.

Zara Choudhry ’22 said Murad “clearly [has] lived through incredibly difficult things” and that it takes “a lot of courage” to share such experiences with others in order to help other Yazidis.

Aastha Kc ’20 said that Murad was “a very inspiring figure” who teaches people “to be vigilant about atrocities happening around the world.”

Around 200,000 Yazidis remain displaced today

Mercy Idindili | mercy.idindili@yale.edu

https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2019/04/ ... di-people/

Around 3,000 Yazidis remain captives today
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Re: Yazidi UPDATES genocide has occurred and is ongoing

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 24, 2019 1:00 am

Nobel Laureate Murad Urges
Justice for Yazidi Victims of ISIS


Nobel laureate and former Islamic State captive Nadia Murad reproached the international community Tuesday, saying in the five years since thousands of ethnic Yazidi women were enslaved by the terror group in Iraq, not a single perpetrator has been brought to justice

"Thousands of ISIL elements are free. Thousands are detained without trial," Murad said, referring to the group by an acronym. "We come here today and ask that those perpetrators of genocide be brought to justice."

Murad made the appeal at a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on the issue of sexual violence in conflict.

At its peak, the so-called Islamic State controlled large swaths of territory in Syria and Iraq. In 2014, its fighters seized the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar, where tens of thousands of Yazidis lived. The Yazidis are a mostly Kurdish-speaking people who practice a unique monotheistic faith and are a minority in the region.

Fighters killed scores of Yazidi men and enslaved several thousand women and girls, in atrocities the U.N. said amounted to genocide. The women were used as sex slaves, often sold or traded from one fighter to another. Many now have children by the men who raped them. Older women were made to do manual labor.

Last month, IS lost its last stronghold in Syria, and thousands of its fighters have been detained by local Kurdish authorities. The fate of many non-Iraqi and Syrian fighters is unclear as governments in Europe and elsewhere debate what to do about their citizens-turned-terrorists.

"They used Yazidi women as a weapon of war, hence, they need to be tried before a special court so that they will be tried for the crimes they committed," Murad told Security Council members. "Bringing elements of ISIL to justice in the framework of an international tribunal that tries them for crimes of genocide and sexual violence against women, would send messages to others and prevent such crimes in the future."

'We need steps, not just slogans'

Murad, who was kidnapped by the terror group and subjected to sexual violence for three months in 2014 , said there has been little international assistance for survivors.

"We come to the U.N., we deliver statements, but no practical steps are taken that include reconstruction or bringing the perpetrators to justice, or returning victims and displaced to their homes," she said. "We need serious steps on the ground and not just slogans."

Her lawyer, Amal Clooney, also addressed the council, warning that if the international community does not seek accountability now, it could soon be too late.

"Let us remember that the crimes committed by ISIS against women and girls are unlike anything we have witnessed in modern times," Clooney said, using another acronym for the group. "But the question of bringing them to justice has barely raised a whisper."

She said if the Security Council cannot prevent sexual violence, it must at least punish it.

"We are facing an epidemic of sexual violence, and I believe justice is the antidote," Clooney said.

In September 2017, the U.N. Security Council authorized the creation of a U.N. investigative team to collect and preserve evidence of IS crimes in Iraq for future trials. Clooney said the team's work got fully under way last month, and they have begun exhuming mass graves to identify the victims' remains.

On Tuesday, after much discussion and some deep disagreements, the Security Council adopted a resolution that focuses on supporting survivors of sexual violence in conflicts around the world.

​"We have now a concentration on accountability. We have a survivor-centered approach. We are putting sanctions much more in the center of actions. We have the U.N. system watching it, reporting it," said German Ambassador Christoph Heusgen, whose delegation drafted the text.​

'Real fight' for resolution

The resolution was adopted with 13 votes in favor and the abstentions of Russia and China. The U.S. had threatened to use its veto if language was not removed recognizing the importance of providing sexual reproductive health care assistance to survivors of sexual violence. After difficult negotiations, the Germans dropped the reference.

"It was for us not the ideal solution. As you could imagine, we would have liked to have strong language repeated and strengthened that language, but this was not possible," Heusgen told reporters. "So, the choice was, 'Do we give up everything for not reaching this?' Our choice was the one that civil society and the victims asked us to do."

France's envoy, Francois Delattre, told reporters ahead of the vote that negotiations were "a real fight." He expressed disappointment that there has been backsliding on women's rights by some countries.

"If we believe in the values of the U.N., if we believe in the values of women's rights, this is a real fight,"he said. "There are attitudes that we just don't understand."

"A survivor-centered approach means ensuring both their rights and addressing their needs," Inas Miloud, director of the Tamazight Women Movement in Libya, told council members. "As a priority, access to lifesaving interventions and post-rape medical care, including comprehensive sexual and reproductive health rights services, emergency contraception, the options of safe abortion services, and HIV prevention and treatment."

https://www.voanews.com/a/nobel-laureat ... 88517.html
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