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83 years since DERSIM - never forget never forgive Turks

A place to talk about domestic politics in Middle East (Iran, Iraq , Turkey, Syria) Also includes topics about Assyrian, Armenian, Chaldean .

Re: MUST read the true horror of the DERSIM massacres

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon May 27, 2019 1:55 am

New book documents folktales of Dersim

A group of villagers - men women and children - gather around a fire after as an elder shares folktales in Dersim in eastern Turkey, an area where most of the inhabitants belong to the country’s biggest ethnic minority – the Kurds – and its biggest religious minority – the Alevis, a heterodox Muslim sect that has for years been sidelined and often persecuted in Turkey

The scene was repeated many times as author and film director Caner Canerik travelled the area, known as Tunceli in Turkish, to collect the stories and compile them in a book entitled “Dersim Masalları 1” (The Stories of Dersim 1) published last month. The book shares 49 folktales from the area, part of his effort to keep alive the traditions of the town and province of the same name.

Dersim was subject to one of the most painful chapters in Turkish history when troops brutally suppressed an uprising by Alevi Kurds, killing an estimated 13,000 to 70,000 people in 1937 and 1938. The leader of the revolt, Seyit Rıza, was executed in 1937.

Born in Dersim, Canerik spent the 1990s in Istanbul where he worked for various TV stations and newspapers. In 2004, he began conducting research for his first novel “Gulazare”, which he wrote in 2007 and published in 2011. He also has made 11 movies.

Canerik worked on the folktales project for a year to record the stories he believes are dying out with the tradition of storytelling in the heavily forested and rugged mountainous area whose villages are often cut off for months by snow in the winter. Dersim, like much of the Kurdish majority east and southeast, is home to the Dengbêj tradition, coming from the words deng (voice) and bej (tell).

“Stories live as long as they are told. The moment they are written down, it is as though we’ve placed a period at the end. They are now confined to a single frame, ” Canerik said.

“It is unfortunate that stories are no longer being narrated to new generations. If today we are talking about Dersim’s culture fading away, then surely we have all played a role in this. I wish we could continue the tradition of folktale narration alive,” he said.

Folktales are not narrated for fun, he said, but as stories of times past that are meant to serve as lessons, particularly for children.

Canerik said one of the storytellers he worked with, Abbas Saylı, had recently passed away. The author said he felt blessed to have recorded the stories of a man he called, “among the most brilliant storytellers of our time”.

“Today, most of the storytellers are women. Many of the leaders who have committed stories to memory unfortunately see storytelling as a form of entertainment; maybe this is how it was perceived during their youth and they don’t wish to waste time telling stories,” Canerik said.

One night after an elder shared a folktale, Canerik asked the source of the story.

“This story was shared by Seyit Rıza to his friends and family at home. And someone who heard it there shared it with me,” the person said.

https://ahvalnews.com/culture/new-book- ... led-dersim
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Re: MUST read the true horror of the DERSIM massacres

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Re: DERSIM is called DERSIM again - never forget what Turks

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Jul 25, 2019 9:29 pm

Four-day festival of culture
resurges in city of Dersim


A four-day festival of culture came to life in the Kurdish city of Dersim on Thursday

The Dersim Culture and Nature Festival, is aiming to promote local beliefs, culture and languages through panel discussions, concerts and other cultural activities.

Dersim is considered to be the heartland of the Alevis - a religious sect whose followers believe in the mystical teachings of Imam Ali. Its inhabitants mainly speak Zazaki, a distinct branch of the Kurdish language.

The area hosting the festival is named after Seyid Riza, a political leader from Zaza origin who fought for Zaza Kurdish rights during the Dersim rebellion of the late 1930s.

Its opening day was attended by local officials and lawmakers, including some from the pro-Kurdish People’s Democratic Party (HDP) and the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP).

The festival had not been held since, reportedly due to a ban from the pro-government administrator.

Fatih Macoglu, incumbent mayor of Dersim from the Communist Party of Turkey (TKP), told Rudaw that the festival was dedicated to the memory of Ayaz, 8, and Nupelda, 4, two local children killed in mid-July by a mine.

“We saw it significant to dedicate this festival to Ayaz and Nupelda, who unfortunately were killed by a mine. Most of the activities of the festival are dedicated for children,” Macoglu said.

Link to Article - Photos:

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/250720193
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Re: DERSIM is called DERSIM again - never forget what Turks

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Aug 07, 2019 7:27 pm

Just a reminder of why Kurds
cannot ever be friends with Turks


The way Kurds have been behaving recently, I do think they have to remember their history:

The Dersim Massacre

Between March 1937 and December 1938 Turkish troops attacked Dersim killing countless THOUSANDS of Kurds in the most horrific and barbarous ways possible

Estimates of the final toll range couls be more than 13,000

This was followed by the forced relocated of many thousands of Kurds

Nobody can even guess at the final number of deaths caused by barbaric Turks X(
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Re: DERSIM is called DERSIM again - never forget what Turks

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon May 04, 2020 11:45 pm

83rd anniversary of Dersim genocide

83 years have passed, and yet Turkey is not willing to acknowledge this Genocide like many other Kurdish Genocides

Those responsible for the deaths of thousands of people have never been tried nor have they been brought out into light. The broken families could never discover their past.

Thousands of people still haven’t received news from their families and close friends. The whereabouts of the Kurdish children taken by the Turkish Government at the time are unknown.

Many other world countries who have had a similar experiences and committed genocide against its people have acknowledged the injustice and sorrow they have caused and have apologised.

However Turkey is continuing to resist and use “it does not exist” strategy with the Kurdish Genocide just as they have with the Armenian Genocide."

The military campaign against Dersim was mounted in response to a relatively minor incident, and it would seem that the army had been waiting for a direct reason to punish the tribes.

One day in March 1937, a strategic wooden bridge was burned down and telephone lines cut. Seyyit Riza and the tribes associated with him were suspected. The army may have believed this to be the beginning of the expected rebellion.

One Turkish source mentions that there was around the same time another minor incident elsewhere in Kurdistan and suggests coordination by Kurdish nationalists.

The first troops, sent in to arrest the suspects, were stopped by armed tribesmen. The confrontations soon escalated. When the tribes kept refusing to surrender their leaders, a large campaign was mounted.

Military operations to subdue the region lasted throughout the summer of 1937. In September, Seyyit Riza and his closest associates surrendered, but the next spring the operations were resumed with even greater force. They must have been of unprecedented violence and brutality.

The number of slaughtered people will never be known but could be as many as 70-90 thousand according to the people of Dersim. More than 10 thousand people were exiled.

The torture and slaughter was of a level never before seen as knives were used to save bullets and many women and children were thrown alive on bonfires, thrown onto rocks, burnt to death as they sheltered in caves
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Re: 83 years since DERSIM - never forget never forgive Turk

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon May 11, 2020 10:20 pm

Re Musa Anter's book
Hatıralarım (My Memories)


Extract: Dersim massacre through the memories of prominent Kurdish writer Musa Anter

It took until 2011 for senior Turkish political leadership to formally apologise for the mass killings.

"If there is need for an apology on behalf of the state, if there is such a practice in the books, I would apologise and I am apologising," incumbent Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in a televised remark in November 2011.

However, many viewed his apology as an empty ploy to win the voting favour of Kurds in the southeast of the country.

In his two-volume book Hatıralarım (My Memories), prominent Kurdish writer and journalist Musa Anter narrates the massacre through officers who, while Anter was a student taking part in compulsory military training, recounted their involvement in the killings.

Anter was born in 1920 in Mardin province. He later moved to Adana to complete his junior, high school and further education.

While a college student in Adana, Anter worked as a reporter for the Turkish-language Vakit newspaper. He has written a number of books in both Kurdish and Turkish.

Anter wrote My Memories from 1991 until 1992 – the year he was assassinated while in Diyarbakir to attend a festival.

“The leader of the Dersim revolution was Seyid Riza. His respected wife was Bese, who led a unit of the guerilla fighters. Almost every day, Bese was attacked by the media in Istanbul. These attacks made me very sad. I protested the attacks. My friends felt this. Half-jokingly and half-seriously, they would call me ‘the grandson of Bese.’ One day in class, they pinned a piece of paper on my back, which read ‘the grandson of Bese.’ When the teacher left the class, the students began laughing at me and teased me,” Anter writes.

He adds that one night, a group of 8-10 students all cursed Bese in his presence – so Anter retaliated by cursing Zubeyda, the mother of Ataturk.

“We took the incident as a joke. However, my classmate Kenan the son of an officer at Adana’s Kurukopru police station, informed his father about the incident. Later, a police team came and took me to the police station. I was detained there for 15 days. This was my first detention.”

The principal of the school went to the police station and told them that Anter only cursed Zubeyda after he was provoked by other students – resulting in his release.

“When I returned to school, nine of my friends who were involved in the incident were expelled. I thought the case was closed. Two months after the incident, I was summoned by the principal. When I entered, I saw a foreign-looking man sitting there. He was Adana’s public prosecutor. He took out a paper and read it out, then made me sign it.

Ataturk had been asked whether he intended to file a lawsuit against me but he had responded in the negative. The prosecutor said, ‘Look my son. Ataturk has pardoned you. Do not repeat such childish behaviour.’ I thanked the prosecutor coldly and left after kissing the principal’s hand.”

Anter says that the mass killings “affected all honest Kurds. So many crimes and genocides were carried out that it was impossible not to be sad.”

The witnesses

In reference to a memoir by former Turkish commander Muhsin Batur, published circa 1958, Anter says that the commander indirectly confesses to killing people in the Dersim massacre “‘after receiving an order from Ankara.’”

He later refers to a February 1990 televised interview with Sabiha Gokcen, Turkey’s first female military pilot, where she indirectly confessed to having taken part in the incident. Known as “the Hero Pilot,” Gokcen was the adopted daughter of Ataturk.

“In the past, high school and university students had to attend a paramilitary camp for 20 days after the end of the academic year, for three years and two years respectively,” says Anter, who adds that he attended similar camp in 1941 and saw a Turkish commander confess his involvement in the mass killings.

“One day, we were taking a break under a tree in the camp. Secaettin, commander of our division, began talking about the events of Dersim with enthusiasm,” Anter writes. He then shares one of the commander’s stories about his involvement in the killings with the reader:

“We had begun sweeping operations in Dersim. We found many families in a cave. They consisted of grandparents, fathers, mothers and children who aged 5-6. We killed the adults with machetes. We did not kill the children so that we could trick them to speak [about the rebellion], because we failed to get anything from the mouths of Dersim’s adults. We would kill them immediately because we knew they would not say anything.

We would kill the parents and grandparents of the children out of their sight so that they would not be terrified...We tried to befriend a child. We gave him food and candy but he refused to eat them. At that moment, one of our aircrafts flew overhead. The child...picked up a stick, held it like a gun and aimed it at our aircraft. This made me very angry and I ordered: “Finish off this bastard.” The soldiers began attacking him with a machete, and after killing him, they threw his body off the cliff,” Anter quotes the commander as saying.

The commander went on to narrate another of his memories of the Dersim genocide.

“Again we were maneuvering through a wide field. We collected thousands of Kurds from caves while they were sleeping. Our commander ordered us to throw them all into the Munzur River to die rather than killing them [by gunshot] because this required too many bullets.

We took the Kurds we had collected, to the edge of Munzur Bridge. The river was very deep and wild. We took these [people] and threw them into the river: some threw themselves in, while others were forced to do so,” continued the commander as per Anter.

The hostages held each other to form a chain, fearing they would have to throw themselves into the river. The soldiers were ordered to use sticks from nearby oak trees to beat the hostages until they jumped to their death. “Some soldiers were ordered to shoot anyone in the river who tried to swim for survival,” the commander said according to Anter.

The third incident the commander narrated to Anter and others in his camp division was the rape of a 12- or 13-year-old Kurdish child, which he said he committed with a number of other soldiers.

Anter ends the book by saying he wrote the book not to spread hatred or a desire to retaliate, but so “people can hate incidents of this kind.”

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/09052020

I do NOT believe in violence

Kurds must NEVER sink to Turkish levels of barbarism

Kurds must ALWAYS remember Turks are NOT their friends

Turks are genetically BARBARIC and must NEVER be trusted
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